Psychology Quotes Collection by Useful Gen I liked


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Mind and Heart


Spiritual understanding is born of harmony between mind and heart.

This harmony of mind and heart does not require the mixing up of their functions.

It does not imply cross-functioning, but co-operative functioning. Their functions are neither identical nor co-ordinate.

Mind and heart must of course be balanced but this balance cannot be secured by pitching the mind against the heart or by pitching the heart against the mind.

It can be attained not through mechanical tension, but through intelligent adjustment.

——-AVATAR MEHER BABA

[Source- Discourses by Meher Baba, volume-I, p-141 (Copyright ©1967 by Adi K. Irani, King’s Rd., Ahmednagar, Maharashtra, India]

As reader of palmistry I was scared when one astrologer gave negative connotation of my head and heart lines going together.

  • it had scared me.

Some of my rash decisions in life always told me about my inner conflict between my mind and heart.

It was soothing to read the Masters advice.

I liked this parable : Mathew 13


The Parable of the Sower (sometimes called the Parable of the Soils) is a parable of Jesusfound in the three Synoptic Gospels in Matthew 13:1-23, Mark 4:1-20, and Luke 8:4-15.

In the story, a sower sows seed and does so indiscriminately. Some seed falls on the path (wayside) with no soil, some on rocky ground with little soil, and some on soil which contained thorns. In these cases the seed is taken away or fails to produce a crop, but when it falls on good soil it grows, yielding thirty, sixty, or a hundredfold.

Jesus then (only in the presence of his disciples) explains that the seed represents the Gospel (the sower being anyone who proclaims it), and the various soils represent people’s responses to it (the first three representing rejection while the last represents acceptance.

I’m a gardener Mentor. I try and die the seeds to make Dreams grow into ambitions, translating into Vision, mission, goals, objectives, action plans, biz, marketing plans etal.

In my efforts, sometimes I come across very distressed mentees. I have to work on making the soil good as they have rocky soil of past bad experiences, thorny soil which does not allow seeds to germinate, or find soil. I spend 5, 13, 26, 52 weeks depending upon the STATE, and SITUATION.

I Sometimes come across Sand, silt or clay land or simply rocky land. Rarely I find delta land ( usualy in C Suite execs) which is fertile . Each gets a different mentor treatment.

It works. There are failures too. As the mentorees stop responding and throw seeds on footpath – it is eaten by birds and pigeons.

In one case, after sowing 150 revenue ideas and rigorously, tilling the land I found failure. I decided to move on. As the farmer/ mentoree just did not understand and allowed my gardening efforts fail.

Sad but true! It happens.

Gardener then moves on too…

The Mentor and the MonaLisa Rhyming Couplet Ideas -Ver 1.0 by Jay


The Mentor and the MonaLisa

Rhyming Couplet Ideas by Jay

See the snuffing of the Mentor,
I think he’s angry at the core.

He finds it hard to see the accidental,
Overshadowed by the brainy rental.

Who is that practicing near the coat?
I think she’d like to eat the goat.

She is but a cunning rani,
Admired as she sits upon a sirianni.

Her crazed Snake is just a Car,
It needs no gas, it runs on double Bar.

She’s not alone she brings a Helix,
a pet Frog, and lots of felix.

The Frog likes to chase a Monolith,
Especially one that’s in the rhinesmith.

The Mentor shudders at the sarcastic goat
He want to leave but she wants his coat.

See ver 2.0 on my blog https://csuitementor.blogspot.com/

The Living – An Original Song by Jay Parkhe


The Living

By Jay

An Original Song

I get on with life as a princess,
I’m a smelly kinda person.
I like singing in a choir and breeding guppies.
I like to contemplate the living.
But when I start to daydream,
My mind turns straight to the dead.

Oh oh oh!

Sometimes I look at myself and I look into my eyes,
I notice the way I think about the dead with a smile,
Curved lips I just can’t disguise.
But I think it’s the living making my life worthwhile.
Why is it so hard for me to decide which I love more?
The Living or…
The Dead?

I like to use words like ‘crikey’ and ‘twizzle.’
I like to use words about the living.
But when I stop my talking,
My mind turns straight to the dead.

Oh oh oh!

Sometimes I look at myself and I look into my eyes,
I notice the way I think about the dead with a smile,
Curved lips I just can’t disguise.
But I think it’s the living making my life worthwhile.
Why is it so hard for me to decide which I love more?
The Living or…
The Dead?

I like to hang out with Wily and Will.
But when left alone,
My mind turns straight to the dead.

Oh oh oh!

Sometimes I look at myself and I look into my eyes,
I notice the way I think about the dead with a smile,
Curved lips I just can’t disguise.
But I think it’s the living making my life worthwhile.
Why is it so hard for me to decide which I love more?
The Living or…
The Dead?

I hate losing card games and headless chickens.
But I just think back to the dead,
And I’m happy once again.

Oh oh oh!

Sharing my fav Newsletter – Brainpickings.org weekly digest.


This is the brainpickings.org weekly digest by Maria Popova. If you missed last week’s edition — Bertrand Russell on what makes a fulfilling life, an illustrated celebration of the many meanings and manifestations of love, an immigrant’s tale — you can catch up right here. And if you’d like to try something new/old, I’ve launched another newsletter that comes out every Wednesday, offering a midweek pick-me-up — something inspiring and uplifting culled from the twelve-year Brain Pickingsarchive. You can sign up for that here. If you’re enjoying my labor of love, please consider supporting it with a donation – each month, I spend hundreds of hours and tremendous resources on it, and every little bit of support helps enormously. If you already donate: THANK YOU.

Kahlil Gibran on the Courage to Weather the Uncertainties of Love

“Love is the quality of attention we pay to things,” poet J.D. McClatchy wrote in his beautiful meditation on the contrast and complementarity of love and desire. And what we choose to attend to — our fear or our faith, our woundedness or our devotion to healing — determines the quality of our love. How we navigate our oscillation between these inescapable polarities is governed by the degree of courage, openness, and vulnerability with which we are willing to show up for and to our own hearts. “The alternations between love and its denial,” philosopher Martha Nussbaum observed in contemplating the difficulty of knowing ourselves“constitute the most essential and ubiquitous structural feature of the human heart.”

That is what the great Lebanese-American poet, painter, and philosopher Kahlil Gibran (January 6, 1883–April 10, 1931) explores in one of the most stirring passages from The Prophet (public library) — the 1923 classic that also gave us what may be the finest advice ever offered on the balance of intimacy and independence in healthy relationships.

Kahlil Gibran, self-portrait

Speaking to the paradoxical human impulse to cower before the largeness of love — to run from its vulnerable-making uncertainties and necessary frustrations at the cost of its deepest rewards — Gibran offers an incantation of courage:

When love beckons to you, follow him,
Though his ways are hard and steep.
And when his wings enfold you yield to him,
Though the sword hidden among his pinions may wound you.
And when he speaks to you believe in him,
Though his voice may shatter your dreams as the north wind lays waste the garden.

For even as love crowns you so shall he crucify you.
Even as he is for your growth so is he for your pruning.
Even as he ascends to your height and caresses your tenderest branches that quiver in the sun,
So shall he descend to your roots and shake them in their clinging to the earth.
Like sheaves of corn he gathers you unto himself.
He threshes you to make you naked.
He sifts you to free you from your husks.
He grinds you to whiteness.
He kneads you until you are pliant;
And then he assigns you to his sacred fire, that you may become sacred bread for God’s sacred feast.

All these things shall love do unto you that you may know the secrets of your heart, and in that knowledge become a fragment of Life’s heart.

But if in your fear you would seek only love’s peace and love’s pleasure,
Then it is better for you that you cover your nakedness and pass out of love’s threshing-floor,
Into the seasonless world where you shall laugh, but not all of your laughter, and weep, but not all of your tears.
Love gives naught but itself and takes naught but from itself.
Love possesses not nor would it be possessed;
For love is sufficient unto love.

Illustration from An ABZ of Love, Kurt Vonnegut’s favorite vintage Danish guide to sexuality

In a sentiment John Steinbeck would come to echo a generation later in his beautiful letter of advice on love to his teenage son, Gibran adds:

Think not you can direct the course of love, for love, if it finds you worthy, directs your course.
Love has no other desire but to fulfill itself.
But if you love and must needs have desires, let these be your desires:
To melt and be like a running brook that sings its melody to the night.
To know the pain of too much tenderness.
To be wounded by your own understanding of love;
And to bleed willingly and joyfully.
To wake at dawn with a winged heart and give thanks for another day of loving;
To rest at the noon hour and meditate love’s ecstasy;
To return home at eventide with gratitude;
And then to sleep with a prayer for the beloved in your heart and a song of praise upon your lips.

The Prophet remains a timeless trove of wisdom and a mighty clarifying force for the turbidity of the heart. Complement it with Gibran on why we make art and his stunning love letters, then revisit Adrienne Rich on how honorable relationships refine our truths, Erich Fromm on the art of loving and what is keeping us from mastering it, Leo Tolstoy on love and its paradoxical demands, and this wondrous illustrated meditation on the many meanings and manifestations of love.

London Cabbie, Brain, Navigation and Hippocampus


Did you know…

… that today is Cabbie Brains Day? In 2000, researchers at the University College of London announced research showing that the brains of London cab drivers grow and adapt to help them keep a detailed mental map of the city of London.

Brain scans revealed that cab drivers have unusually large development in one area of the hippocampus — the part of the brain which deals with navigation.

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“I think if I’ve learned anything about friendship, it’s to hang in, stay connected, fight for them, and let them fight for you. Don’t walk away, don’t be distracted, don’t be too busy or tired, don’t take them for granted. Friends are part of the glue that holds life and faith together. Powerful stuff.”

— Jon Katz