Good Behavioural Science and marketing links


The Persuasion Code Part 1, with Christophe Morin
Christophe Morin, co-author of the first neuromarketing book and now The Persuasion Code, is the neuroscience half of the SalesBrain duo. He digs into the science that underlies a pain-based approach to sales and persuasion. Read more…

The Paper Towel Test For Customer Experience

Want a clue as to how a business that claims to be customer-focused really feels about its customers? Check their approach to dispensing paper towels! Read more…

The Persuasion Code Part 2, with Patrick Renvoise

In the second part of our Persuasion Code series, co-author Patrick Renvoise joins us to share how years of experimentation and client testing have shown what really works in persuasion and sales.  Read More…

Transforming Customer Experience with Carnival’s John Padgett
How do you take the best customer experience and make it even better. John Padgett has done it twice, first at Disney and now at Carnival. It starts with rethinking every aspect of the customer’s journey. Read more…

How many really bad presentations have you sat through. David Hooker, evangelist for upstart presentation Prezi, tells you how to engage your audience and ensure they remember your message. Read more…

Behavioral Science in Business

It’s almost here! Learn from the best minds applying behavioral science to business! Save 20% with code “ROGER” and support the amazing work of TakeHerBack at the same time.

Be a Five-Star Communicator with Carmine Gallo
Crush your next presentation, whether it’s an auditorium or cramped conference room. Speaking expert Carmine Gallo has deconstructed successful TED talks and other speeches to teach you what works! Read more…

Futurist and author Thomas Koulopoulos paints a future both scary and exciting in Revealing the Invisible – AI-driven behavior analysis, hyper-personalization, even consumer “mind-reading.”  Read More…

Clockwork – Design Your Business To Run Itself

Mike Michalowicz is back to teach you the ultimate entrepreneural secret – how to get your business to run itself. Mike’s new book is Clockwork, and he shares ideas in the way that only he can. Read more…

Study: Surprise Winner In Audio vs Video For Emotion
Would an emotionally charged scene from Game of Throneslight up your brain more if you saw the scene on video or heard the passage from the book via audio? This and other tests yielded surprising results.  Read More…

The 1-Page Marketing Plan with Allan Dib

Forget big marketing plans that gather dust on your shelf. Business coach Allan Dib explains why one page is enough, and tells you the exact steps to creating your 1-page plan.  Read more…

Topple: Explosive Growth via Ecosystem Thinking
The days of the standalong business are numbered, says author and futurist Ralph Welborn. In Topple, he explains why you need to be part of an ecosystem that will feed your business new opportunities. Read more…

Real Artists Don’t Starve with Jeff Goins

If you are a creator of any kind – writer, musician, painter, etc. – don’t fall for the “starving artist” myth. Author Jeff Goins gives practical examples showing how you can make your art and prosper financially, too! Read more…

Is your marketing budget maxed out? Do you need more sales? If you like my Neuromarketing, Entrepreneur and Forbes articles, you’ll definitely enjoy Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing (Wiley). It’s full of practical, ways to use behavior research, neuroscience, and psychology to make your marketing more persuasive! Get Brainfluence…

Random Phrases today with Creativity boosters for the day.


Great Sunday.  5th meeting of Toastmasters in 3rd Club of Bangalore. Young, vibrant crowd mixed with some bearded oldies and middle aged Techies.

  1. Love Birds Meaning: A pair of people who have a shared love for each other. No. did not happen. Day of course, began different. 
  2. Jaws of Death Meaning: Being in a dangerous or very deadly situation.  No. Not really. Saw a Premier movie for a while but did not experience it 🙂 
  3. Two Down, One to Go Meaning: Two things have been completed, but there is one more that has yet to be finished. Yes. Today’s short walk left the Udemy course study unfinished for the day .
  4. No Ifs, Ands, or Buts Meaning: Finishing a task without making any excuses. Experienced this later in the day with two Excuse Masters cleverly negotiating with each other. 
  5. Right Off the Bat Meaning: Immediately, done in a hurry; without delay. Yes. without any inhibition responded emails and gave guidance to even a mail marked FYI 🙂 🙂 . Lessons repeated in Communications. 
  6. Break The Ice Meaning: Breaking down a social stiffness.  Great speeches by two youngsters and one International Humorist champs at Toastmasters. The breaking the ice speech was literally great. 
  7. A Chip on Your Shoulder Meaning: Being angry about something that happened in the past. Yes. I still carry one anger chip on my shoulder. 
  8. Shot In the Dark Meaning: An attempt that has little chance for success.  no like hope taking shot in the dark is not part of my strategy. 
  9. Let Her Rip Meaning: Permission to start, or it could mean ‘go faster!’  If the brainfog is gone and wiser sense prevails – you don’t need any permission. 
  10. Wake Up Call Meaning: An occurance of sorts that brings a problem to somebody’s attention and they realize it needs fixing.  Hmmm… will wait and watch though. 
  11. Keep Your Shirt On Meaning: Keeping calm. Usually said by someone who is trying to avoid making others upset.  Yes. even while in an angry tone, try not to rant. 🙂

Your mind isn’t deep at all. In fact, it’s flat. | Big Think


Your mind isn’t deep at all. In fact, it’s flat.
August 9, 2018 by DEREK BERES

Photo: Getty Images
A box of crackers features the tagline, “Conscious eating.” An artistic subgroup embraces the Burning Man ethos: “Conscious music.” This self-declared genre arises from the same set that talks about techniques for “higher consciousness.” In every instance, the sentiment is obvious: my product is better than yours because there’s something deeper going on over here.

Consciousness, from their perspective, is like a ladder descending into an unfathomable abyss. This depth can be penetrated, through meditation, through breathing exercises or austerities, through faith or sheer willpower or a combination of the two, or through, apparently, eating crackers. For some, higher consciousness is handed down at birth, from a past life, or bestowed by a teacher, as in the Indian idea of shaktipat. Whatever the method, everyday consciousness only scratches the surface. Something deeper exists, waiting to be mined by the steadfast observer.

A deep sigh of relief washed over me when reading that Nick Chater called the notion of higher consciousness “nonsense on stilts.” The British behavioral scientist doesn’t mince words in his new book, The Mind is Flat. While many believe consciousness to be a hidden mystery few can access, Chater’s take on this evolutionary phenomenon is quite pedestrian. What you see is effectively what you get.

No amount of therapy, dream analysis, word association, experiment or brain-scanning can recover a person’s ‘true motives,’ not because they are difficult to find, but because there is nothing to find. The inner, mental world, and the beliefs, motives, and fears it is supposed to contain is, itself, a work of the imagination.

This is not shocking if you consider consciousness in its most fundamental regard. By definition, consciousness is simply what you’re paying attention to at the moment, which can amount to no more than four or five things. You can refine from there: the goal of meditation, for example, is to focus on one thing—a mantra, a candle flame, your breathing, something basic and accessible. Whether you’re an expert meditator or chronic multitasker, the effects on consciousness are physiological, not mystical.

Yet that’s not how we feel, which is why Chater’s book is likely to rattle many mental cages. An emotion, he says, is an interpretation of a physiological change in your body. He’s not the first thinker to posit this; Lisa Feldman Barrett wrote an entire book on this topic. While this will not square well with those who claim they know something to be true because they feel it, Chater’s point should not be dismissed. Anecdotal interpretations have the habit of often being wrong.

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We actually have a limited set of feelings. Think about the innumerable issues that cause a stomach to churn. Context matters, and in this sense, our brain contextualizes the physical sensations based on past experiences. Memory is fluid but based on prior events. Essentially, Chater states that we’re just making it all up as we go along.

We crave narrative and go to great lengths to fill in incomplete stories regardless of the validity of assumptions being made. This is why Chater thinks the role of psychotherapy is dated. He calls the Jungian notion of a collective unconscious “the astrology of psychology,” rather fitting given that Jung speculated that UFOs are psychic projections from our hidden collective drive. To Chater, comparing Jungian analysis to psychology is akin to relating astrology to astronomy. One exploits patterns of thought and behavior in an attempt to derive coherence, while the other relies on data to pinpoint exact locations and predictable patterns.

Chater believes psychotherapy feeds the illusion of a hidden depth and claims the industry is on the outs.

[Psychotherapy is] doomed by the fact that there is not a deep inner story that is hiding from you. Rather, you’ve got the first draft or a set of incoherent notes for a novel. You’ve got an incoherent muddle. And we’re all incoherent muddles to some degree. But when some of those incoherencies cause us problems, when we’re terrified of something we very much want to do, even something as narrow as a fear of spiders, these are conflicts in our thinking and reactions.

In his latest book, The Strange Order of Things, neuroscientist Antonio Damasio writes that feelings are “for” life regulation. They provide essential information to help us remain in homeostasis. If something is out of whack a feeling lets us know. Again, context matters. Our stomach gets jittery if we’ve eaten something rotten and when we’re courting a romantic partner. As Damasio states, feelings alert us to potential danger as well as potential opportunity. There is nothing metaphysical about the process.

But we perceive it to be other, as Chater writes. Instead of a perception refined by years of experiences, we come to feel that the deep well of the unconscious is simmering below the surface, like the famed kundalini energy at the base of the spine. Hyperventilate enough and you unleash its fury. Well, true, Chater might say—hyperventilate enough and your nervous system is certainly going to react in peculiar and dangerous ways.

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Does this make psychotherapy useless? Not so fast, Chater concludes. First off, talking to another is proven medicine. Chater also says creativity is an important aspect of our humanity. Ingenious solutions can be worked out between a therapist and patient, provided it’s understood as a metaphor. His contention seems to be assuming metaphor to represent reality as stated. Constructing new patterns of thought and behavior has therapeutic utility; uncovering unconscious motives or beliefs is not only counterproductive but dangerous:

The reason I think the unconscious is a dangerous metaphor is because it gives you the impression that mental things that are unconscious could be conscious. This whole idea of uncovering things from the unconscious and making them conscious has the presupposition that they are of the same type.

He compares this yearning for a hidden depth to Freud’s iceberg: consciousness at the top, the real story under the surface, which Chater says is a mistaken analysis of how our brains actually work.

The things we’re conscious of—experiences, thoughts, fragments of conversation—are completely different in type from the things we’re unconscious of—all these mysterious brain processes, which lay down and retrieve memories, piece fragments of information together, and so on. The brain is doing lots of unconscious work—but it is not thought in any way we understand it.

What is unconscious can never be made conscious because the information is inaccessible by design. I’ll never be conscious of my liver detoxifying my blood, but if something goes wrong in that process I’ll certainly feel the result. If the unconscious could be made conscious, we’d never need a doctor to diagnose an illness; our body would tell us.

We’re just not as deep as we think, which is fine: we have plenty of work to do on the surface. Perhaps if we stop taking so many metaphors as reality, we’d get along much better, with ourselves and those around us. There’s plenty to see when we open our eyes. Closing them to seek a treasure causes us to miss the treasure right before us.

Stay in touch with Derek on Facebook and Twitter.

via Your mind isn’t deep at all. In fact, it’s flat. | Big Think

Delta Free verse by Jay


A mudflat, however hard it tries,
Will always be Delta.
Does the mudflat make you shiver?
does it?

I cannot help but stop and look at the Theta estuary.
Does the estuary make you shiver?
does it?

I will consider my sudd.
For my sudd is little because it wants to provide.
A sudd is diminutive. a sudd is shrimpy,
a sudd is teentsy, however.

Things Don’t change…


Things Don’t Change, WE change! – said Henry David Thoreau.  In my life, I have seen that not only WE change, We help change. But sometimes, we come across People who have piles of masks and masks which require constant unpeeling. The process is not pleasant for the untrained surgeon like me but also for those who laboriously have put them on and maintained very protectively for years!

But, sometimes, unwittingly, people open their mind’s windows or closed Silos – like the Johari Windows and we get a peep into their Brains.  The darkest parts are become visible to us and once we have got an insight into this side of people – judgements become easier.

Sometimes though, the masks which are not carefully worn -fall off and the Real faces in all their gory, bloody ways become visible that cause sadness and does not help us.

People don't change

Omitted – Free Verse by Jay


Omitted

Free verse by jay

All that is present is not absent,
absent, by all account is Absent.
Now absentminded is just the thing,
To get me wondering if the absent is inattentive.

How happy are inadvertent, occasional omission!
Odd, obvious, occasional omission.
Never forget the unintended and accidental occasional omission.

Just like copious remarks, is polemical prefaces.
Do polemical prefaces make you shiver?
do they?

They cause BrainFog in my brain!

Interesting Quote, Pseudo-variants and Provoking Phrases of the day


Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Be who you are and say what you feel,

because those who mind don’t matter,

and those who matter don’t mind.”

— Bernard M. Baruch

Recently I read a variant / pseudo version of the above phrase and I was thinking – LOL ! 🙂

  • Poke Fun At
    Meaning: 
    Making fun of something or someone; ridicule.

    When you lose your originality, you search the web.  When your borrowed phrases exhaust and your plagiarism is exposed, one chooses to get back at people by twisting, twirling, modifying, stretching, shortening Quotes to misuse, abuse and put to disuse in order to Poke Fun At people who reveal your Truth but hold back due to professional secrecy. 

  • Elephant in the Room
    Meaning: 
    Ignoring a large, obvious problem or failing to address an issue that stands out in a major way.

    People who skirt, deflect and avoid issues while taking stances which are aggressive, abrasive and false pretenses but when they are exposed, their falsehood is open they still do not have the courage to see the Elephant in the room and behave like blind, deaf, mute people showing off their ‘Handicap'(as in Golf) to save the Facepalm moments. 

  • Beating Around the Bush
  • Meaning: 
  • Someone who is beating around the bush is someone who avoids the main point.
  • This is Self-Explnatory.

The people I am talking about have three distinct qualities.

First, they are willing to disagree ferociously, but talk civilly, (writing blasphemously with full blown profanity when challenged) about nearly every meaningful subject: religion, abortion, immigration, the nature of consciousness.

Second, in an age in which popular feelings about the way things ought to be often override facts about the way things actually are, each is determined to resist parroting what’s politically convenient using memory of convenience, logic of convenience and in the end wanting to make you see their TRUTH as your truth. Some of them are Pseudo-intellectuals and at last count someone said there are 150 of them in Delhi alone who are peddling some media house plan asking for Rs.5 Crores and finally willing to settle for as little as Rs. 5000 !

And third, some have paid for this commitment by being purged from institutions that have become increasingly hostile to unorthodox thought — and have found receptive audiences elsewhere – which includes Commies, pseudo-Marxists, pseudo Nihilists, Maoists and Wayfarers who wish to overthrow the government by hook or crook – they are seditionists who indoctrinate people into being brainwashed under the influence of Drugs and fake Love.

The Hermetic Revival: 7 Ancient Principles For Self-Mastery


The Hermetic Revival: 7 Ancient Principles For Self-Mastery

via The Hermetic Revival: 7 Ancient Principles For Self-Mastery

I’m Right – You’re so Wrong – Nihilist Perspective today


William Shakespeare eloquently summarized the existential nihilist’s perspective when, in this famous passage near the end of Macbeth, he has Macbeth pour out his disgust for life:

Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more; it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,

Signifying nothing.

In real life, I have dealt with some pseudo-Nihilists and my experience is :

  1. Conscience is Conscience as long as it is favorable to me.
  2. I am always Right and you are ALWAYS wrong.
  3. Because you are a Non-Nihilist – you must be apologetic while Saying Sorry or apology is not Nihilist’s Tone or Tenor.
  4. As long as you play by Nihilist made “Rules” and “Hierarchical” system that favors Nihilists – You can play.  The moment you begin talking about your rules – Nihilists Clam up – go into deep silence, wait for an opportunity to strike back and put up a Facade called “Quietude”.

“A nihilist is a manor a woman who judges of the world as it is that it ought not to be, and of the world as it ought to be that it does not exist.” According to this view, our existence (action, suffering, willing, feeling) has no meaning: the pathos of ‘in vain’ is the nihilists’ pathos — at the same time, as pathos, an inconsistency on the part of the nihilists.

Friedrich Nietzsche, KSA 12:9 [60], taken from The Will to Power, section 585, translated by Walter Kaufmann
The converse is true when it comes to Nihilists of the day are concerned – Action, suffering, willing and feeling is for them while the other person and his/ her perspective has no right to exist and has no meaning. They are so inconsistent and always out to prove One-Up man/woman ship over others.
The Pseudo-Nihilists I have encountered have one thing in common:
They believe that you are “Not the Sharpest Tool in the Shed””
Meaning: 
Someone who isn’t witty or sharp, but rather, they are ignorant, unintelligent, or senseless.
And when you admit, it boosts their Superior Egos.
I had one such Terrifying incident with one of the mentees – a pseudo! Close But No Cigar
Meaning: 
Coming close to a successful outcome only to fall short at the end.  And as was expected the blame was put on me as the Mentor while Mentee Nihilist showed no sense of remorse, was unapologetic and aggressive. 
Sadly enough, this assignment was shortlived.   To sum it up it can be said “It’s Not All It’s Cracked Up To Be””
Meaning: 
Failing to meet expectations; not being as good as people say.
I may say it is All Greek To Me
Meaning: When something is incomprehensible due to complexity; unintelligble.
And Nihilist would readily agree – It is Greek Origin 🙂

Interesting Philosophies


Nihilism (/ˈnaɪ(h)ɪlɪzəm, ˈniː-/; from Latin nihil, meaning ‘nothing’) is the philosophical viewpoint that suggests the denial or lack of belief towards the reputedly meaningful aspects of life. Most commonly, nihilism is presented in the form of existential nihilism, which argues that life is without objective meaning, purpose, or intrinsic value.[1] Moral nihilists assert that there is no inherent morality, and that accepted moral values are abstractly contrived. Nihilism may also take epistemological, ontological, or metaphysical forms, meaning respectively that, in some aspect, knowledge is not possible, or reality does not actually exist.

The term is sometimes used in association with anomie to explain the general mood of despair at a perceived pointlessness of existence that one may develop upon realising there are no necessary norms, rules, or laws.[2]

Nihilism has also been described as conspicuous in or constitutive of certain historical periods: for example, Jean Baudrillard and others have called postmodernity a nihilistic epoch;[3] and some religious theologians and figures of religious authority have asserted that postmodernity[4] and many aspects of modernity[5] represent a rejection of theism, and that such rejection of theistic doctrine entails nihilism.

via Nihilism – Wikipedia

At 12, I was already a Single Parent kid, having lost my father and a child labour trying to find ways to earn to find my personal identity and dignity of labour.

I found a mentor who taught me some of these 100, 200 years old Greeko Roman Philosophies which I learnt but forgot in the ensuing years of learning to survive, find status, make a family etc. etc.

As a Mentor, I did come across some pseudo Nihilists which I shall describe in coming posts. Pure Nihilists do not exist. They change with times.  The famous saying of Henry David Thoreau = “Things don’t change, We Change” , aptly describes a Nihilist.  Many of Nihilists I have met have self fulfilling Rules, Truths, morality which they make and change to suit themselves while denouncing those who try and impose upon them the socially established norms of behaviour such as sympathy, empathy, gratitude, conformity, obedience, non-diffidence but the pseudo Nihilist displays tendencies of Memory of convenience, Logic of Convenience to suit themselves and justifies it with Nihilism.

Such people deserve, deep peeling of their layers of masks painfully without even offering them plastic surgery as they need full and complete exposure in public for their misdeeds, misbehaviour, misdemeanour and hideous, hypocritic behaviour which can be detrimental to the people (including do-gooders) or the society in general.

 

Nihilistic’s delusion


nihilistic delusion
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to nihilistic delusion: delusion of poverty, delusion of negation, Cotard Syndrome
delusion [dĕ-loo´zhun]
a false belief that is firmly maintained in spite of incontrovertible and obvious proof to the contrary and in spite of the fact that other members of the culture do not share the belief. adj., adj delu´sional.
bizarre delusion one that is patently absurd, with no possible basis in fact.
delusion of control the delusion that one’s thoughts, feelings, and actions are not one’s own but are being imposed by someone else or some other external force.
depressive delusion a delusion that is congruent with a predominant depressed mood, such as a delusion of serious illness, poverty, or spousal infidelity.
erotomanic delusion a delusional conviction that some other person, usually of higher status and often famous, is in love with the individual; it is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
fragmentary d’s unconnected delusions not organized around a coherent theme.
delusion of grandeur (grandiose delusion) delusional conviction of one’s own importance, power, or knowledge, or that one is, or has a special relationship with, a deity or a famous person. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
delusion of jealousy a delusional belief that one’s spouse or lover is unfaithful, based on erroneous inferences drawn from innocent events imagined to be evidence and often resulting in confrontation with the accused. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
mixed delusion one in which no central theme predominates. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
delusion of negation (nihilistic delusion) a depressive delusion that the self, part of the self, part of the body, other persons, or the whole world has ceased to exist.
paranoid d’s an older term for delusion of grandeur and delusion of persecution; its use is discouraged.
delusion of persecution a delusion that one is being attacked, harassed, cheated, persecuted, or conspired against. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
delusion of reference a delusional conviction that ordinary events, objects, or behaviors of others have particular and unusual meanings specifically for oneself.
somatic delusion a delusion that there is some alteration in a bodily organ or its function. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
systematized d’s a group of delusions organized around a common theme; typical of delusional disorders or paranoid schizophrenia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
de·lu·sion of ne·ga·tion
a delusion in which one imagines that the world and all that relates to it have ceased to exist.
Synonym(s): nihilistic delusion
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
nihilistic delusion
[nī′hilis′tik]
Etymology: L, nihil, nothing, icus, form of, deludere, to deceive
a persistent denial of the existence of particular things or of everything, including oneself, as seen in various forms of schizophrenia. A person who has such a delusion may believe that he or she lives in a shadow or limbo world or that he or she died several years ago and that only the spirit, in a vaporous form, really exists. See also delusion.
Mosby’s Medical Dictionary, 9th edition. © 2009, Elsevier.
A rare delusional disorder linked to depression, suicidal ideation, sleep deprivation or derealisation, in which a person believes he/she is dead or dying, doesn’t exist, is putrefying, or has lost his/her blood or internal organs
Management Tricyclic antidepressants, serotoninergics
Segen’s Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

via Nihilistic delusion | definition of nihilistic delusion by Medical dictionary

Nihilistic’s Delusion


nihilistic delusion

Related to nihilistic delusion: delusion of poverty, delusion of negation, Cotard Syndrome
delusion
a false belief that is firmly maintained in spite of incontrovertible and obvious proof to the contrary and in spite of the fact that other members of the culture do not share the belief. adj., adj delusional.
bizarre delusion one that is patently absurd, with no possible basis in fact.

delusion of control the delusion that one’s thoughts, feelings, and actions are not one’s own but are being imposed by someone else or some other external force.

depressive delusion a delusion that is congruent with a predominant depressed mood, such as a delusion of serious illness, poverty, or spousal infidelity.

erotomanic delusion a delusional conviction that some other person, usually of higher status and often famous, is in love with the individual; it is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.

fragmentary d’s unconnected delusions not organized around a coherent theme.

delusion of grandeur (grandiose delusion) delusional conviction of one’s own importance, power, or knowledge, or that one is, or has a special relationship with, a deity or a famous person. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.

delusion of jealousy a delusional belief that one’s spouse or lover is unfaithful, based on erroneous inferences drawn from innocent events imagined to be evidence and often resulting in confrontation with the accused. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.

mixed delusion one in which no central theme predominates. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.

delusion of negation (nihilistic delusion) a depressive delusion that the self, part of the self, part of the body, other persons, or the whole world has ceased to exist.

paranoid d’s an older term for delusion of grandeur and delusion of persecution; its use is discouraged.

delusion of persecution a delusion that one is being attacked, harassed, cheated, persecuted, or conspired against. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.

delusion of reference a delusional conviction that ordinary events, objects, or behaviors of others have particular and unusual meanings specifically for oneself.

somatic delusion a delusion that there is some alteration in a bodily organ or its function. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.

systematized d’s a group of delusions organized around a common theme; typical of delusional disorders or paranoid schizophrenia.

de·lu·sion of ne·ga·tion
a delusion in which one imagines that the world and all that relates to it have ceased to exist.
Synonym(s): nihilistic delusion

Etymology: L, nihil, nothing, icus, form of, deludere, to deceive
a persistent denial of the existence of particular things or of everything, including oneself, as seen in various forms of schizophrenia.

A person who has such a delusion may believe that he or she lives in a shadow or limbo world or that he or she died several years ago and that only the spirit, in a vaporous form, really exists. See also delusion.

A rare delusional disorder linked to depression, suicidal ideation, sleep deprivation or derealisation, in which a person believes he/she is dead or dying, doesn’t exist, is putrefying, or has lost his/her blood or internal organs
\

It is ” rarest of rare” for a Mentor to get a Nihilist as Mentee and it is even more difficult to find the kind of delusions the mentee has about him/herself.  It requires not just watching, but deeply observing the behavioural patterns and deep probe / exploration, observing of the biorhythms that the Mentor comes to know and can rationalise the behaviours on display.

Mentor advice – Walk away. Let the psychotherapists do their job as mentors are mentors – not NLP, Hypnotists, Doctors least of all psychotherapists. They must use all their skills to walk away without causing any negative reactions or a STATE that becomes difficult for even the therapists to handle.