Fun Quotes in Calligraphy


Kevin Kelly and 68 bits of his Unsolicited Advice.


68 Bits of Unsolicited Advice

It’s my birthday. I’m 68. I feel like pulling up a rocking chair and dispensing advice to the young ‘uns. Here are 68 pithy bits of unsolicited advice which I offer as my birthday present to all of you.

• Learn how to learn from those you disagree with, or even offend you. See if you can find the truth in what they believe.

• Being enthusiastic is worth 25 IQ points.

• Always demand a deadline. A deadline weeds out the extraneous and the ordinary. It prevents you from trying to make it perfect, so you have to make it different. Different is better.

• Don’t be afraid to ask a question that may sound stupid because 99% of the time everyone else is thinking of the same question and is too embarrassed to ask it.

• Being able to listen well is a superpower. While listening to someone you love keep asking them “Is there more?”, until there is no more.

• A worthy goal for a year is to learn enough about a subject so that you can’t believe how ignorant you were a year earlier.

• Gratitude will unlock all other virtues and is something you can get better at.

• Treating a person to a meal never fails, and is so easy to do. It’s powerful with old friends and a great way to make new friends.

• Don’t trust all-purpose glue.

• Reading to your children regularly will bond you together and kickstart their imaginations.

• Never use a credit card for credit. The only kind of credit, or debt, that is acceptable is debt to acquire something whose exchange value is extremely likely to increase, like in a home. The exchange value of most things diminishes or vanishes the moment you purchase them. Don’t be in debt to losers.

• Pros are just amateurs who know how to gracefully recover from their mistakes.

• Extraordinary claims should require extraordinary evidence to be believed.

• Don’t be the smartest person in the room. Hangout with, and learn from, people smarter than yourself. Even better, find smart people who will disagree with you.

• Rule of 3 in conversation. To get to the real reason, ask a person to go deeper than what they just said. Then again, and once more. The third time’s answer is close to the truth.

• Don’t be the best. Be the only.

• Everyone is shy. Other people are waiting for you to introduce yourself to them, they are waiting for you to send them an email, they are waiting for you to ask them on a date. Go ahead.

• Don’t take it personally when someone turns you down. Assume they are like you: busy, occupied, distracted. Try again later. It’s amazing how often a second try works.

• The purpose of a habit is to remove that action from self-negotiation. You no longer expend energy deciding whether to do it. You just do it. Good habits can range from telling the truth, to flossing.

• Promptness is a sign of respect.

• When you are young spend at least 6 months to one year living as poor as you can, owning as little as you possibly can, eating beans and rice in a tiny room or tent, to experience what your “worst” lifestyle might be. That way any time you have to risk something in the future you won’t be afraid of the worst case scenario.

• Trust me: There is no “them”.

• The more you are interested in others, the more interesting they find you. To be interesting, be interested.

• Optimize your generosity. No one on their deathbed has ever regretted giving too much away.

• To make something good, just do it. To make something great, just re-do it, re-do it, re-do it. The secret to making fine things is in remaking them.

• The Golden Rule will never fail you. It is the foundation of all other virtues.

• If you are looking for something in your house, and you finally find it, when you’re done with it, don’t put it back where you found it. Put it back where you first looked for it.

• Saving money and investing money are both good habits. Small amounts of money invested regularly for many decades without deliberation is one path to wealth.

• To make mistakes is human. To own your mistakes is divine. Nothing elevates a person higher than quickly admitting and taking personal responsibility for the mistakes you make and then fixing them fairly. If you mess up, fess up. It’s astounding how powerful this ownership is.

• Never get involved in a land war in Asia.

• You can obsess about serving your customers/audience/clients, or you can obsess about beating the competition. Both work, but of the two, obsessing about your customers will take you further.

• Show up. Keep showing up. Somebody successful said: 99% of success is just showing up.

• Separate the processes of creation from improving. You can’t write and edit, or sculpt and polish, or make and analyze at the same time. If you do, the editor stops the creator. While you invent, don’t select. While you sketch, don’t inspect. While you write the first draft, don’t reflect. At the start, the creator mind must be unleashed from judgement.

• If you are not falling down occasionally, you are just coasting.

• Perhaps the most counter-intuitive truth of the universe is that the more you give to others, the more you’ll get. Understanding this is the beginning of wisdom.

• Friends are better than money. Almost anything money can do, friends can do better. In so many ways a friend with a boat is better than owning a boat.

• This is true: It’s hard to cheat an honest man.

• When an object is lost, 95% of the time it is hiding within arm’s reach of where it was last seen. Search in all possible locations in that radius and you’ll find it.

• You are what you do. Not what you say, not what you believe, not how you vote, but what you spend your time on.

• If you lose or forget to bring a cable, adapter or charger, check with your hotel. Most hotels now have a drawer full of cables, adapters and chargers others have left behind, and probably have the one you are missing. You can often claim it after borrowing it.

• Hatred is a curse that does not affect the hated. It only poisons the hater. Release a grudge as if it was a poison.

• There is no limit on better. Talent is distributed unfairly, but there is no limit on how much we can improve what we start with.

• Be prepared: When you are 90% done any large project (a house, a film, an event, an app) the rest of the myriad details will take a second 90% to complete.

• When you die you take absolutely nothing with you except your reputation.

• Before you are old, attend as many funerals as you can bear, and listen. Nobody talks about the departed’s achievements. The only thing people will remember is what kind of person you were while you were achieving.

• For every dollar you spend purchasing something substantial, expect to pay a dollar in repairs, maintenance, or disposal by the end of its life.

•Anything real begins with the fiction of what could be. Imagination is therefore the most potent force in the universe, and a skill you can get better at. It’s the one skill in life that benefits from ignoring what everyone else knows.

• When crisis and disaster strike, don’t waste them. No problems, no progress.

• On vacation go to the most remote place on your itinerary first, bypassing the cities. You’ll maximize the shock of otherness in the remote, and then later you’ll welcome the familiar comforts of a city on the way back.

• When you get an invitation to do something in the future, ask yourself: would you accept this if it was scheduled for tomorrow? Not too many promises will pass that immediacy filter.

• Don’t say anything about someone in email you would not be comfortable saying to them directly, because eventually they will read it.

• If you desperately need a job, you are just another problem for a boss; if you can solve many of the problems the boss has right now, you are hired. To be hired, think like your boss.

• Art is in what you leave out.

• Acquiring things will rarely bring you deep satisfaction. But acquiring experiences will.

• Rule of 7 in research. You can find out anything if you are willing to go seven levels. If the first source you ask doesn’t know, ask them who you should ask next, and so on down the line. If you are willing to go to the 7th source, you’ll almost always get your answer.

• How to apologize: Quickly, specifically, sincerely.

• Don’t ever respond to a solicitation or a proposal on the phone. The urgency is a disguise.

• When someone is nasty, rude, hateful, or mean with you, pretend they have a disease. That makes it easier to have empathy toward them which can soften the conflict.

• Eliminating clutter makes room for your true treasures.

• You really don’t want to be famous. Read the biography of any famous person.

• Experience is overrated. When hiring, hire for aptitude, train for skills. Most really amazing or great things are done by people doing them for the first time.

• A vacation + a disaster = an adventure.

• Buying tools: Start by buying the absolute cheapest tools you can find. Upgrade the ones you use a lot. If you wind up using some tool for a job, buy the very best you can afford.

• Learn how to take a 20-minute power nap without embarrassment.

• Following your bliss is a recipe for paralysis if you don’t know what you are passionate about. A better motto for most youth is “master something, anything”. Through mastery of one thing, you can drift towards extensions of that mastery that bring you more joy, and eventually discover where your bliss is.

• I’m positive that in 100 years much of what I take to be true today will be proved to be wrong, maybe even embarrassingly wrong, and I try really hard to identify what it is that I am wrong about today.

• Over the long term, the future is decided by optimists. To be an optimist you don’t have to ignore all the many problems we create; you just have to imagine improving our capacity to solve problems.

• The universe is conspiring behind your back to make you a success. This will be much easier to do if you embrace this pronoia.

[You can follow me @kevin2kelly]

Translation in French. Portuguese. German. Other translations welcomed.

Mentor Asks: 5 Random Questions


  • On any given day, what do you think you spend the most time doing?

  • What animal do you think best reflects your personality?

  • What uncommon thing would you like to see become more common?

  • What is your biggest regret from the last month?

  • What do you hope to be an expert about at some point in your life?

Mentor Asks: Random 5 Questions to provoke thoughts.


If you could assign one household chore to someone else, what would it be?


What’s something commonly do today that you think people will wonder why anyone would ever do that fifty years from now?


What is it that motivates yourself the most?


What is the most recent fact you learned that surprised you?


If you could choose to be famous for something, what would it be?

Random Acts of Kindness


1. Bring board games to play at a nursing home
2. Pick up roadside bottles and put them in a recycling bin.
3. Send somebody an e-card, just because. The funnier, the better.
4. Thank your teachers with a homemade gift or message
5. Who is your most selfless friend? Do something amazing for her

never have I ever…


  1. Never have I ever created a Facebook account.
  2. Never have I ever laughed so hard I peed in my pants a little.
  3. Never have I ever watched a superhero movie.
  4. Never have I ever been to Hollywood.
  5. Never have I ever tried cutting my friend’s hair.
  6. Never have I ever gone out in my pajamas.
  7. Never have I ever snuck candy into a movie theater.
  8. Never have I ever gone skinny dipping.
  9. Never have I ever gone down the rabbit hole while on the Internet.
  10. Never have I ever tried a Youtube challenge and failed miserably.
  11. Never have I ever been to a Comic Con.

RANDOM Phrases


  1. Cry Over Spilt MilkMeaning: It’s useless to worry about things that  already happened and cannot be changed.
  2. Elvis Has Left The BuildingMeaning: Something that is all over.
  3. Jaws of LifeMeaning: Usually this references a tool used by rescuers when they pry or cut open a car to save the occupant.

Facts


  1. In the Philippines, you can buy spaghetti at McDonald’s, where they also sell a “McDo” piece of chicken.
  2. “Darth Vader” is derived from Old Dutch, meaning “Dark Father”.
  3. Gaming-related accidents increased by 26.5% during the first 5 months of Pokémon Go being released. This included 2 deaths and $25.5 million in damages.

Random Acts of Kindness


1. Give a restaurant or coffee gift card to someone (bank cashier, postal worker, homeless person, or random stranger).
2. If you see someone with their tail light or brake lights out, let them know.
3. Pick up litter and be kind to our environment.
4. Take a roll of quarters to the laundromat and leave enough for one wash/dry at some of the stations.
5. Teach Your Children to Recycle

Wisdom Quotes 7


It is not the absence of fear that is courage, but the mastery over it.
Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear. (Mark Twain)
==========
It’s the things and people someone loves that tells you who they are.
The things that we love tell us what we are. (Thomas Aquinas)

Would you rather…


  1. Would you rather spend a day switching radio stations and hearing the same song or switching TV stations and seeing the same show?
  2. Would you rather be bitten by a poisonous snake or a poisonous spider?
  3. Would you rather have a friend that types in all caps in texts or a friend that replies to all in emails?
  4. Would you rather marry your perfect partner or achieve all of your dreams?
  5. Would you rather die at 50 with no regrets or at 90 with numerous regrets?

Random Acts of Kindness


1. Cold outside? Buy old scarves from your local thrift store (or even make them yourself) and tie them around trees, benches, etc. with a note offering them to people in need.
2. Give a homeless person your doggie bag
3. Knit a baby cap and donate it to the local NICU.
4. Pump gas for someone at a self-serve.
5. Wash an elderly person’s car.

Wisdom Quotes 6


The wise can gain more from a simple question than the simple can learn from a wise answer.

A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer. (Bruce Lee)

If you’re going through a rough time, keep going until you reach the end.
If you’re going through hell, keep going. (Winston Churchill)

My Prayer today


Magnificent Father, eternal praise upon you, I come to you with a remorseful heart. I’m so sorry, I did not read your scriptures on the most holy day. Relieve me of my sins, heal me of these self inflicted wounds. Pass your judgment so I may spread your glory to others.

WORD OF THE DAY


WORD OF THE DAY
Biodiversity
bahy-oh-dih-VERS-ih-tee
Part of speech: noun
Origin: English, 1980s
1

The variety of life in the world or in a particular habitat or ecosystem.

Examples of Biodiversity in a sentence

“The Australian biodiversity is responsible for almost 10% of all species on Earth.”

“The foundation was focused on efforts to preserve the biodiversity of the rainforest.”

Via: Seth Godin Newsletter


The moral imagination

What do you dream of?

We’ve worked overtime to create a sports imagination. Kids dream of dunking a basketball or scoring the winning goal at the World Cup. That’s a pretty new phenomenon. Instant replay, endorsement deals and trading cards make it easy to imagine.

We’ve certainly established a profit imagination. Everywhere we turn, the p&l mindset isn’t far away. Add a zero. That’s winning.

And there’s a health imagination as well. The ideal of fitness and well-being, the very nature of an immune system that we’re supposed to support.

But what about the moral imagination?

Visualizing what’s possible. Deciding to do something about it. Wondering (to ourselves and then to the world, “how can I make this better?”)

Not because it’s our job or because we’ll win a prize. Simply because we can.

We can start where we are and we can make things better.

 

How economists rode maths to become our era’s astrologers | Aeon Essays


via How economists rode maths to become our era’s astrologers | Aeon Essays

Alan Jay Levnovitz is an associate professor of philosophy and religion at James Madison University in Virginia. His most recent book is The Gluten Lie: And Other Myths About What You Eat (2015), and the editor, with Daniel Boscaljon, of Teaching Religion and Literature (2018).

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Since the 2008 financial crisis, colleges and universities have faced increased pressure to identify essential disciplines, and cut the rest. In 2009, Washington State University announced it would eliminate the department of theatre and dance, the department of community and rural sociology, and the German major – the same year that the University of Louisiana at Lafayette ended its philosophy major. In 2012, Emory University in Atlanta did away with the visual arts department and its journalism programme. The cutbacks aren’t restricted to the humanities: in 2011, the state of Texas announced it would eliminate nearly half of its public undergraduate physics programmes. Even when there’s no downsizing, faculty salaries have been frozen and departmental budgets have shrunk.

But despite the funding crunch, it’s a bull market for academic economists. According to a 2015 sociological study in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, the median salary of economics teachers in 2012 increased to $103,000 – nearly $30,000 more than sociologists. For the top 10 per cent of economists, that figure jumps to $160,000, higher than the next most lucrative academic discipline – engineering. These figures, stress the study’s authors, do not include other sources of income such as consulting fees for banks and hedge funds, which, as many learned from the documentary Inside Job (2010), are often substantial. (Ben Bernanke, a former academic economist and ex-chairman of the Federal Reserve, earns $200,000-$400,000 for a single appearance.)

Unlike engineers and chemists, economists cannot point to concrete objects – cell phones, plastic – to justify the high valuation of their discipline. Nor, in the case of financial economics and macroeconomics, can they point to the predictive power of their theories. Hedge funds employ cutting-edge economists who command princely fees, but routinely underperform index funds. Eight years ago, Warren Buffet made a 10-year, $1 million bet that a portfolio of hedge funds would lose to the S&P 500, and it looks like he’s going to collect. In 1998, a fund that boasted two Nobel Laureates as advisors collapsed, nearly causing a global financial crisis.

The failure of the field to predict the 2008 crisis has also been well-documented. In 2003, for example, only five years before the Great Recession, the Nobel Laureate Robert E Lucas Jr told the American Economic Association that ‘macroeconomics […] has succeeded: its central problem of depression prevention has been solved’. Short-term predictions fair little better – in April 2014, for instance, a survey of 67 economists yielded 100 per cent consensus: interest rates would rise over the next six months. Instead, they fell. A lot.

Nonetheless, surveys indicate that economists see their discipline as ‘the most scientific of the social sciences’. What is the basis of this collective faith, shared by universities, presidents and billionaires? Shouldn’t successful and powerful people be the first to spot the exaggerated worth of a discipline, and the least likely to pay for it?

In the hypothetical worlds of rational markets, where much of economic theory is set, perhaps. But real-world history tells a different story, of mathematical models masquerading as science and a public eager to buy them, mistaking elegant equations for empirical accuracy.

WORD OF THE DAY


WORD OF THE DAY
Patronage
PEY-trə-nij
Part of speech: noun
Origin: French, 14th century
1

The support given by a patron.

2

The regular business given to a store, restaurant, or public service by a person or group.

Examples of Patronage in a sentence

“He received enough patronage from the art gallery owner to be able to quit his day job and focus on painting.”

“I love to go out to eat, but I try to give my patronage to locally owned restaurants.”

Become Better. Get Inspired.


  1. “I’ve known people that the world has thrown everything at to discourage them…to break their spirit. And yet something about them retains a dignity. They face life and don’t ask quarters.” – Horton Foote
  2. “Happiness comes when your work and words are of benefit to others.” – Buddha
  3. “Although I’m only fourteen, I know quite well what I want, I know who is right and who is wrong. I have my opinions, my own ideas and principles, and although it may sound pretty mad from an adolescent, I feel more of a person than a child, I feel quite indepedent of anyone.” – Anne Frank, The Diary of Anne Frank

Wisdom Quotes 4


If you can’t be the light in the shadows, be the gem that refracts the light all around.

There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it. (Edith Wharton)

Don’t wait for life to come knocking on your door, open the door yourself and step through.
If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door. (Milton Berle)

Seasoned. Nuts Quotable.


SEASONED NUTS: QUOTABLE
“Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.”

“A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness. Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters. A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot.”

― Robert A. Heinlein

WORD OF THE DAY


WORD OF THE DAY
Gochujang
KOH-choo-jang
Part of speech: noun
Origin: Korean, year unknown
1

A spicy paste used in Korean cooking, made from red chili peppers, fermented soybeans, rice, and salt.

Examples of Gochujang in a sentence

“I’m challenging myself to try one new food a week; this week it’s gochujang.”

“The special today is a spicy shrimp rice bowl with gochujang, cucumber, radishes, and carrots.”

3-2-1 The JamesClear.com Newsletter


3-2-1 Thursday
Note: You are receiving this email because you subscribed to my weekly 3-2-1 newsletter. Every Thursday, I share 3 ideas from me, 2 quotes from others, and 1 question for you to ponder. Occasionally, I also send out long-form articles on habits and self-improvement.

3 ideas, 2 quotes, 1 question (May 14, 2020)

“Working to deliver the most wisdom per word of any newsletter on the web.”

Read this on JamesClear.com

Happy 3-2-1 Thursday,

Just a quick note before we start: Atomic Habits is on sale for 40% off in the US and 30% off in the UK. (You can also get the audiobook for a steep discount.) If you’ve been thinking about grabbing a copy for yourself (or as a graduation gift), but haven’t pulled the trigger yet, then today could be a good day to do it.

Alright, moving on to the main event. Here are 3 ideas, 2 quotes, and 1 question to ponder this week.

3 IDEAS FROM ME

I.

Entrepreneurship is a personal growth engine disguised as a business pursuit.

(Share this on Twitter)


II.

The 3 Levels of Employees:

Level 1 — You do what you are asked to do.

Level 2 — Level 1 + You think ahead and solve problems before they happen.

Level 3 — Level 2 + You proactively look for areas of opportunity and growth in the business, and figure out how to tap into them.


III.

The more control you have over your attention, the more control you have over your future.

(Share this on Twitter)

2 QUOTES FROM OTHERS

I.

Albert Gray, a life insurance executive at Prudential, discussing the importance of habits in the 1940s:

“Every single qualification for success is acquired through habit. People form habits and habits form futures. If you do not deliberately form good habits, then unconsciously you will form bad ones. You are the kind of person you are because you have formed the habit of being that kind of person, and the only way you can change is through habit.”

Source: The Common Denominator of Success


II.

George Mallory, a mountaineer who led early British expeditions to Mount Everest in the 1920s, on the joy of climbing:

“People ask me, ‘What is the use of climbing Mount Everest?’ and my answer must at once be, ‘It is of no use.’ There is not the slightest prospect of any gain whatsoever. Oh, we may learn a little about the behavior of the human body at high altitudes, and possibly medical men may turn our observation to some account for the purposes of aviation. But otherwise nothing will come of it. We shall not bring back a single bit of gold or silver, not a gem, nor any coal or iron… If you cannot understand that there is something in man which responds to the challenge of this mountain and goes out to meet it, that the struggle is the struggle of life itself upward and forever upward, then you won’t see why we go. What we get from this adventure is just sheer joy. And joy is, after all, the end of life. We do not live to eat and make money. We eat and make money to be able to live. That is what life means and what life is for.”

Source: Climbing Everest: The Complete Writings of George Mallory

1 QUESTION FOR YOU

Am I doing this for Present Me or Future Me?

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Until next week,

James Clear
Author of the million-copy bestseller, Atomic Habits
Creator of the Habit Journal

P.S. This mother made a list of every question her kids asked her in one day.

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Via: Seth Godin Newsletter


The moral imagination

What do you dream of?

We’ve worked overtime to create a sports imagination. Kids dream of dunking a basketball or scoring the winning goal at the World Cup. That’s a pretty new phenomenon. Instant replay, endorsement deals and trading cards make it easy to imagine.

We’ve certainly established a profit imagination. Everywhere we turn, the p&l mindset isn’t far away. Add a zero. That’s winning.

And there’s a health imagination as well. The ideal of fitness and well-being, the very nature of an immune system that we’re supposed to support.

But what about the moral imagination?

Visualizing what’s possible. Deciding to do something about it. Wondering (to ourselves and then to the world, “how can I make this better?”)

Not because it’s our job or because we’ll win a prize. Simply because we can.

We can start where we are and we can make things better.

 

Facts


  1. Although GPS is free for the world to use, it costs $2 million per day to operate. The money comes from American tax revenue.
  2. Psychopaths can only think of the possible positive consequences of their actions, not the negative ones.
  3. During the 1908 Olympics in London, the Russians showed up 12 days late due to the fact that they were using the Julian calendar instead of the Gregorian calendar.

Become Better. Get Inspired


  1. “I’d rather learn from one bird how to sing than teach ten thousand stars how not to dance” – E.E. Cummings
  2. “Chaos is more freedom; in fact, total freedom. But no meaning. I want to be free to act, and I also want my actions to mean something.” – Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler’s Wife
  3. “If you feel far from God, guess who moved?” – Robin Jones Gunn, Surprise Endings

would you rather….


  1. Would you rather eat a delicious meal with no utensils or a mediocre meal with utensils?
  2. Would you rather stuck in a cave for a day or stuck in an elevator for a day?
  3. Would you rather understand what everyone is thinking or see everyone’s future?
  4. Would you rather lose all your keys or your wallet?
  5. Would you rather have every minute feel like an hour or every hour feel like a minute?