Good Behavioural Science and marketing links


The Persuasion Code Part 1, with Christophe Morin
Christophe Morin, co-author of the first neuromarketing book and now The Persuasion Code, is the neuroscience half of the SalesBrain duo. He digs into the science that underlies a pain-based approach to sales and persuasion. Read more…

The Paper Towel Test For Customer Experience

Want a clue as to how a business that claims to be customer-focused really feels about its customers? Check their approach to dispensing paper towels! Read more…

The Persuasion Code Part 2, with Patrick Renvoise

In the second part of our Persuasion Code series, co-author Patrick Renvoise joins us to share how years of experimentation and client testing have shown what really works in persuasion and sales.  Read More…

Transforming Customer Experience with Carnival’s John Padgett
How do you take the best customer experience and make it even better. John Padgett has done it twice, first at Disney and now at Carnival. It starts with rethinking every aspect of the customer’s journey. Read more…

How many really bad presentations have you sat through. David Hooker, evangelist for upstart presentation Prezi, tells you how to engage your audience and ensure they remember your message. Read more…

Behavioral Science in Business

It’s almost here! Learn from the best minds applying behavioral science to business! Save 20% with code “ROGER” and support the amazing work of TakeHerBack at the same time.

Be a Five-Star Communicator with Carmine Gallo
Crush your next presentation, whether it’s an auditorium or cramped conference room. Speaking expert Carmine Gallo has deconstructed successful TED talks and other speeches to teach you what works! Read more…

Futurist and author Thomas Koulopoulos paints a future both scary and exciting in Revealing the Invisible – AI-driven behavior analysis, hyper-personalization, even consumer “mind-reading.”  Read More…

Clockwork – Design Your Business To Run Itself

Mike Michalowicz is back to teach you the ultimate entrepreneural secret – how to get your business to run itself. Mike’s new book is Clockwork, and he shares ideas in the way that only he can. Read more…

Study: Surprise Winner In Audio vs Video For Emotion
Would an emotionally charged scene from Game of Throneslight up your brain more if you saw the scene on video or heard the passage from the book via audio? This and other tests yielded surprising results.  Read More…

The 1-Page Marketing Plan with Allan Dib

Forget big marketing plans that gather dust on your shelf. Business coach Allan Dib explains why one page is enough, and tells you the exact steps to creating your 1-page plan.  Read more…

Topple: Explosive Growth via Ecosystem Thinking
The days of the standalong business are numbered, says author and futurist Ralph Welborn. In Topple, he explains why you need to be part of an ecosystem that will feed your business new opportunities. Read more…

Real Artists Don’t Starve with Jeff Goins

If you are a creator of any kind – writer, musician, painter, etc. – don’t fall for the “starving artist” myth. Author Jeff Goins gives practical examples showing how you can make your art and prosper financially, too! Read more…

Is your marketing budget maxed out? Do you need more sales? If you like my Neuromarketing, Entrepreneur and Forbes articles, you’ll definitely enjoy Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing (Wiley). It’s full of practical, ways to use behavior research, neuroscience, and psychology to make your marketing more persuasive! Get Brainfluence…

Competing for Shoppers’ Habits


Global Consumer Insights Survey

via Competing for Shoppers’ Habits

A psychotherapist explains the 5 stages of changing behavior | Ladders


THE WHOLE HUMAN
A psychotherapist explains the 5 stages of changing your behavior
By Katherine Schafler
Aug 17, 2018

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Wait, just thinking about changing is a stage of change? That’s how you start to change — by thinking about it without doing anything?

YES.

The idea that just thinking about what you want to change is an actual stage of change is so rational and obvious after the fact (of course you need to think about what you want to change and how you want to change it before you actually do it), but in the midst of contemplating change most people encounter this sentiment:

All I do is think about changing X and talk about changing X but I don’t actually do it.

This creates stuckness and a negative self-fulfilling prophecy.

You tell yourself over and over again that you’re not someone who does anything to change, you just think about it a ton, and then you become someone who doesn’t do anything to change and who just thinks about it a ton.

Breaking that cycle starts with a deeper understanding of what the process of change actually looks like.

Deliberate change comes in 5 stages:

1. Pre-contemplation
You’re not even thinking about changing. An example of this is a woman who’s dating a man who isn’t great for her, but she’s having fun dating him anyway. She doesn’t think he’s not great for her, she doesn’t think he’s a bad or incompatible choice. She’s just enjoying being around him.

2. Contemplation
In this stage, it’s likely that a few things have happened which have catalyzed some thoughts around whether you should change something. Using the prior example, the woman might have noticed a few things about the man she’s dating that she doesn’t like. She might be starting to ask herself questions like, Where is this going? … What am I doing? … Well he’s really great at X but not so great at Y … Why am I putting up with this? … Is he enough for me? … Am I really happy with this situation?

You don’t actually change anything in the second stage.

You basically just think about what your life would be like if you continued doing the exact same things, what your life would be like if you decided to change and the ways by which that potential change might occur.

3. Preparation
This is when you’ve decided you want to change and you go into preparation mode.

You might ask around about how other people have successfully changed and announce to others that you’ve decided to change in order to hold yourself accountable to it. You might read books or blog posts on change, you might make purchases for yourself that make it easier to enable and stick to the change you want (cough, lululemon, cough).

4. Action
The action stage is marked by actual behavioral changes.

This is the stage that most people associate with change because it’s the stage that’s most visible.

In our example, this is the stage where you have the tough conversation and you break up.

5. Maintenance
A crucial and often overlooked stage.

It can take so long to realize you need to change ‘for real’ as well as to take the actionable steps to change, that by the time you get to the maintenance stage it’s easier to think the tough work is behind you.

NOPE.

Ironically, this is the stage that often requires the most support.

Relapsing (i.e. going back on your decision to change) is usually a natural part of this stage that is misinterpreted as failure.

When you have support through the maintenance stage, you learn to prevent, examine and explore your relapses, mining for the loopholes that you then begin to tie off.

With the exception of pre-contemplation, all the stages of change require a great deal of work, attention, time and energy. Thinking is included in this work. It’s hard to encounter conflicting thoughts about what you want and then reconcile the dissension.

Figuring out what you really, truly want can be challenging enough — implementing and maintaining the changes you’ve decided upon can be even more so. #5 of my ten tenets especially applies here, and if it applies to you, recruit support.

Katherine Schafler is an NYC-based psychotherapist, writer, and speaker.  For more of her work, join her newsletter community, read her blog, or follow her on Instagram.

via A psychotherapist explains the 5 stages of changing behavior | Ladders