Meet my Mentor – Mr. Askander Mirza. ExtraOrdinary Speaker.


Meet my Mentor at and President of the Garden City Toastmasters International
Mr. Askander Mirza.

IMG_20170220_172859
Corporate Trainer, NLP practitioner, Leadership coach, Distinguished Toastmaster, Public Speaker,
Life Coach
Mr. Mirza came to our Toast masters club to deliver an Educational Speech. Impressed, I went to meet him next
week He readily agreed to Mentor me as I explained that as a Speaker I wanted to learn and practice on Voice
and Body Language. Next week, he pushed me to give an ‘Ice Breaker’ speech impromptu! The week after, he
asked my speech write up and returned as it was not as per his guidelines. Again, I went to club – without
rehearsing and he pushed me to the Stage and gave a Thumbs up – Meaning – Rock the Stage! And, I did. He
gave few tips and then some more and sent a WhatsApp about my energy levels and Voice lowering as also Time
management in Speeches. He is humble, Hyper-Active – “Walk the Talk and Talk the Talk” and the Soul, Spirit,
Body, Mind of the Club. He is simple, humble and has a habit of Formal Attire, which he has inherited from his
beloved father – as he once told us, when the HyperCurios of the club asked him this question.
He has a Competitive spirit which I still at Peak. He participates in the Contests as also mentors, coaches new,
upcoming speakers including Aged speakers like me who are keen” Erudite” learners like him.
This is the First and the oldest Toastmasters club of Bangalore and he grapples with multiple issues without even
a frown on his smiling face and that is his speciality. As an Evaluator – he is inspiring yet Direct and clear in his
Feedback to speakers. He knows and shares that his club has highest number of Distinguished ‘toastmasters and
the Best in Class Speech Evaluators in the Bangalore town.
When I told him about my Blog and whether he would like to be interviewed – He readily agreed.
Here are some of the answers:

  1. What motivated you to become what you ARE today?
    The Quest for knowledge. In my job and my business I’d rarely come across people of knowledge or Erudite . That left me ever thirsty to associate myself with knowledgeable people, to be in Company of educated people and the search ended when I found Toastmasters.

 
2. What is the greatest joy you get from what you do?
The Joy of sharing. When you share the knowledge you have, when you help
someone in whatever manner , when you impart knowledge to someone else, the
joy , the satisfaction you get is better experienced.
3. What do your fans mean to you?
They mean everything to me. I gives immense pleasure to know that there are
people out there who recognise you, who value you, who place you in high
esteem. In this materialistic world it is definitely appreciable that there are people
who really appreciate your knowledge and experience, who value you for your
asset of knowledge rather than the assets of real estate or money.
4. What are you working on next?
I am working on to write a book on how to tackle day to day problems, to prevent
tension from building up, how to stop bad experiences and failures play on your
mind, to live in present and to plan for future.
5. Who are your favourite authors?
Dale Carnegie, Charles Dickens, Leo Tolstoy, Agatha Christie, Jane Austin, Chetan
Bhagat, Gabriel Garcia, Jibran, Bernad Shaw, Vikram Seth, R K Narayan, Ruskin
Bond, Prem Chand, Shaikh Saadi, Razia Bhat, James Hadley Chase & many more.
6. What inspires you to get out of bed each day?
The morning prayer and pre-morning prayers. I wake up at 4 am most of the days,
sometimes 5 am.
7. When you're not working, how do you spend your time?
Reading books. Watching TV and corresponding on email, face book etc.
8. Do you have some work and rest related non-negotiable rules?

When I am working I don’t like anyone or anything to disturb me. I am fully
dedicated and nothing can deviate me from my work.
I hit the bed before 10 pm and don’t pick up calls after that.
9. How do you discover the authors you read?
I opt for some popular authors. When it comes to new authors I prefer reading the
review of their books before reading the book itself. And sometimes by word of
mouth.
10. Do you remember the first assignment you ever did?
I would like to tell about my first speech rather than my professional experience as
an Engineer. My First Speech called the “ Ice Breaker” in Toastmasters parlance
was delivered in mid 2007 for which I got the Best Speaker Award at my Club.
Before that my Mentor made me deliver the speech in front of him many times, and
after lot of trial and error , corrections and improvements he gave me the signal to
deliver my first speech. Post that there is no looking back.
11. What is your working process?
While working I am opposite of procrastination. I do today what I have to do
tomorrow. I always meet my targets before time. I realise my team finds it difficult
to keep pace with me. In such situations I try to be little flexible.
12. What is your unique Work Style?
No short cuts. I sincerely do what I have to do and hope for the best results.
13. Do you remember the first story you ever read, and the impact it had on you?
Cannot be specific about the first. In our times the stories were heard from elders
rather than read. My father told a story about a scorpion and a tortoise whose
lesson was to not to trust again the person who has harmed you.
14. What is your approach and how do you Plan the Finishing touches to the work?
I divide my work in parts. Tackle one at a time. Integrate the work. Review. If
necessary reorganise it. The finishing touches are by using suitable words,
phrases and idioms wherever possible.
15. What are your five favourite books, and why?
How to win friends and Influence people, Sapiens, Three Thousand Stitches,
Yadoon ki Baraat, Nostradamus, Vulture is a patient bird, Discovery of India, My
Journey, Positive Attitude and many more.
16. What do you read for pleasure?
Short stories .
17. What is your e-reading device of choice?
Laptop
18. Please describe your desk.
A ‘S’ type chair, a small table arranged in a way that the light falls on the book
from my back. A note pad, some pens.
19. Where did you grow up, and did this influence your business, If Yes – How?
I grew up in the city of Mysore. Most of the time my father would take me along. He
was an erudite. He would have long discussions with his friends on topics like
history, religion, literature , psychology etc. That way I had lot of knowledge at a
very young age. Heard names like Frued, Shakespeare, Milton, Chalukya, Jesus,
Ben Hur, Ashoka, Buddha , Bose, Churchill, Hitler, Bernard Shaw etc at an age
when children would hardly know the names of their teachers.
I started my business in Mysore but was not so successful as Mysore is not a
good place for business.
20. When did you first started what you do?
I started my business in Mysore. Was not so successful. Went to Middle East and
started my fabrication and machineries business there. Initially it was tough. Later
on I became highly successful thanks to my technical knowledge , completing
projects before time and giving high quality at the same time. My habit of doing
tomorrow’s work today really worked and also perfect planning.

Random Phrases, My Day and Creativity


  1. Knuckle Down Meaning: Getting sincere about something; applying oneself seriously to a job.  Two impromptu Ice-breaker speeches – moving towards Goal 1. Did not win prize, got a participation certificate but the pleasure was in audience individuals – rank strangers coming back not just complimenting but quoting me ‘VERBATIM’ and saying, they loved it, they would like to keep in touch, some even said we would like to learn a few things from you. I was humbled. 
  2. Dropping Like Flies Meaning: To fall down ill or to die in large numbers. I wish it does not happen to humans, pests and insects, viruses and diseases is another matter. What I noticed today is the best Evaluators club of Toastmasters had difficulty in filling the hall with audience and participants for the Marathons the Area Directors are planning to hold across city.  One actually said about ATTRITION of members? That was sad.  It said a lot about the lack of leadership and the Pull and Push of the managing committees.  
  3. Man of Few Words Meaning: A person who does not speak a great deal; someone who talks with as few words as possible.  Met an interesting person. He was my speech evaluator. His speciality is being brief and as an extempore impromptu ice breaker speaker who was pushed to speak – I had failed by exceeding the time limit.  He said he will mail his evaluation ! That’s it.  🙂 
  4. Poke Fun At Meaning: Making fun of something or someone; ridicule.  Had this experience. At the end of a dominant communicator speech the speaker did actually did not want any questions. When asked – he asked me to repeat thrice and explain 4 time and I was about to say – “Let’s take this off line as I did not ask this to challenge you but to support your views, just clarifying a point”.  Some Speakers are on their High HOrse ! They feel, they are the only one who can challenge! Anyone asking a question is a lowly minion, dimwit and brainless.  My Professorial hat tells me to answer them – Questions are never stupid – answers are – like mine 🙂 🙂 .  
  5. Hear, Hear Meaning: A shout of agreement, or to draw attention to a speaker. I asked the speaker that when a friend is faced with problems – should I make an appreciative enquiry and find what solutions he has in his mind, as he knows the problems best. Second, is my friend looking for an Affirmation that the solution he has found has my tacit support so that he can try it out with heart? I was taken round and round in derogatory circles with a menacing look on the face by a socalled Guinness Award winner and World Speech champion and I felt very sad for him.  What did I do to hurt his Ego? 
  6. On the Same Page Meaning: Thinking alike or understanding something in a similar way with others.  Sometimes, in a gathering when you wish to say that you are in the same boat, same page, thinking alike – it is best to use non-verbal communication like nodding your head to convey Yes, I agree.  
  7. Swinging For the Fences Meaning: Giving something your all.  One more article coming up in a new club Newsletter which was launched today. Felt great.  Meeting new Chamber of commerce and meeting some very interesting and interested people ( atleast on the face of it) I felt great and felt genuinely that there are things I can do to assist and help.  The new Chairman was receptive and said wants to have a one on one Strategy/ vision statement session.  He said he is a Visual thinker like me, that was pleasing. 
  8. Up In Arms Meaning: Angry; being roused to the point that you are ready to fight.  But I gave up. I saw on Whatsapp the pictures of a poor girl being honored by a sport shoes company and giving them her name as she could not afford them. i felt sad for someone whose dream was ignited, latent wishes brought to fore in my mentoring but had given up on them with diffidence.  I was angry inside but let go. 
  9. Quick and Dirty Meaning: Things that are fixed with great speed, but as a result, it’s probably not going to work very well. Hmmm… it was a busy day, I could have gone and got my Suits overhauled now that I have lost so much weight and bought a new pair of formal shoes as the formal meetings are moving up but I just changed jackets for two occasions – Reminder to self – GO FIX THIS ASAP. 
  10. Mountain Out of a Molehill Meaning: One who escalates small things and turns them into big problems.  I found a senior evaluator indulging in overstatements, exaggerations, over praise, excessive acting skills show and was bit turned off.  Then I met him one on one for about 7 minutes, got his life story out and realised that even at our late age – the need to RECOGNITION is so high that NAME AUR FAME KE LIYE KUCHH BHI KAREGA i.e. I’ll do any thing to get name and fame. I quietly agreed to disagreed and moved on to another person by saying “Sorry, Sir, I do not wish to monopolise you, others also need your kind attention”. Thank you.

Rebel Wisdom – ignite, inspire, transform


When our existing assumptions and ways of thinking break down, it’s the rebels and the renegades, those who dare to think differently, who need to reboot the system.

via Rebel Wisdom – ignite, inspire, transform

Smashwords – Interview with DHANANJAYA PARKHE


via Smashwords – Interview with DHANANJAYA PARKHE

The One Routine Common to Billionaires, Icons and World-Class Performers


via The One Routine Common to Billionaires, Icons and World-Class Performers

Success and Failure


SUCCESS ~ FAILURE —-

Spiritual unfoldment takes place through experience of such opposites as pleasure and pain, success and failure, virtue and vice. Both extremes are equally necessary for the fulfillment of life although they appear to be direct opposites of each other. In fact, from a larger point of view, the opposites of experience turn out to be complementaries rather than contraries. They appear to be clashing incompatibles only for the mind that cannot transcend them.

The opposites of failure and success need each other. There can be no success unless there is failure; and it is equally true that there can be no failure unless there is success. If one has never succeeded in a particular thing, it is meaningless to style such attempts or their results as failure. In the same way, success is success only if there have been prior failures, either by that particular person or by others who tried in the same field.

Success and failure are generally measured, appreciated or suffered more in relation to what has been achieved in the same field by others, than in relation to a target which has been hit or missed. If it is usual for any person to do a particular thing, the doing of it is not to be regarded as a success, although it is success in the sense that what was planned has been achieved.

In every worldly sphere there is bad, worse and worst, as well as good, better and best. There is a conscious or unconscious racing with each other, as well as a perception of that which is beyond all racing. It is out of this racing that success or failure arises.

BEAMS FROM MEHER BABA ON THE SPIRITUAL PANORAMA, 58-62
By Meher Baba
An Avatar Meher Baba Trust eBook June 2011
Copyright : AMBPPCT
Photo: AMBPPCT

How to Become a Professional Sleeper (Career Path)


How to Become a Professional Sleeper (Career Path)
Joanna Zambas

Is your morning alarm usually followed by 15-20 snoozes? Do you find getting out of bed every morning extremely difficult? And do you crawl through work each day at work, dreaming about home-time and climbing back into bed for some much-need beauty sleep?

If this sounds a lot like your dream job, keep reading to find out all you need to know about becoming a professional sleeper!

1. Research the Profession
You know you want to sleep all day (don’t we all?) but what you really need to know is what your working hours will be, how much you’ll get paid and what skills you need to meet the requirements for the job.

Job Description
Quite simply, a professional sleeper is someone who gets paid to sleep. They generally do this as part of scientific research where scientists analyse their sleep patterns or to evaluate the quality of various sleep-related products.

Although your day-to-day duties will vary, you’ll be expected to:

test mattresses, pillows and quilts
write detailed reports on comfort, room lighting, feelings and noise disruption
occasionally take sleep aids that will help you fall asleep for medical trials
take sleeping pills to remain still for art exhibitions.
Essential Skills and Qualities
In order to succeed in this exciting career path, you’ll need:

the ability to sleep in new surroundings, away from home for long periods of time
the ability to sleep with wires attached to you, knowing that people will be watching you
good overall health and fitness
excellent communicationand interpersonal skills
the ability to write compelling and interesting reports
good observational skills
a strong character and not be bothered about spending a lot of time secluded from others
strong organisational skills
Working Hours and Conditions
Sleeping on the job might not be all it’s hyped up to be, as contracts for professional sleepers aren’t known for being consistent, which is typical for all types of freelance work. In other words, this isn’t your typical 9-to-5 job.

Mattress and sleep testers will generally need to sign up to a number of different studies and will need to manage their diary to ensure no two jobs clash. Certain studies can last between 24 hours to 2 months, so there’s no telling how long you will need to spend away from home.

Employers should be able to guarantee you a safe working environment – you’ll either work/sleep in test centres, hospital or even luxury hotels, and there will always be a medical professional close by if needed.

Salary Prospects
As the length and duties of each job vary, it’s difficult to set an average salary.

That said, NASA paid volunteers $18,000 (£13,250) to lie in bed for 70 days back in 2013, while one study at the University of Colorado offered to pay subjects up to $2,730 (£2,010) to participate in a 14-17 sleep study.

In 2006, meanwhile, budget hotel chain Travelodge hired Wayne Munnelly into their newly created Director of Sleep position. He was offered a £60,000 salary to sleep in every single one of the chain’s 17,000 rooms and evaluate lighting, noise, cleanliness and overall comfort.

Roisin Madigan, a student from Manchester, was paid £1,000 a day to sleep in designer beds for a month, while the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City offered subjects $10 (£7.30) an hour to take sleeping pills and sleep on bed in the middle of the museum as part of a Chu Yun exhibit.

Pros and Cons
Pros include:

you’ll get paid to sleep (could this possibly be the best job in the world?!)
you’ll get to learn more about your own sleeping patterns
you’ll receive medical treatment for any problems detected
studies aren’t continuous and if you walk out midway, you still get paid for the days you participated in the study
if you’re a mattress tester, you’ll get to stay in luxury hotels and enjoy five-star treatment – for free!
Cons include:

you’ll need to make some lifestyle changes – for example, you won’t be allowed caffeine, alcohol, vitamins, etc or you’ll be asked to drink/eat certain things as part of the study
you may spend a long time indoors and will begin to feel out of touch with the outside world
you’ll spend long periods of time away from family and friends
you won’t have a regular source of income
you may have to wait up to a month to be allowed to participate in another test

2. Get the Qualifications
There are no specific qualifications required to become a professional sleeper or mattress/quilt tester. However, you do need to be at least 18 years of age and will need to fit a variety of criteria for the study. This will vary from job to job, but you’ll usually need to be in good health and willing to provide your full health history and, in some cases, even the medical history of your entire family.

For some studies (ie: those that test sleeping pills), you may need to suffer from insomnia or generally be someone who has difficulty sleeping at night. Additionally, you’ll need to have a flexible working schedule as projects can take place at any time of the day.

3. Land Your First Job
Landing your first job as a sleep tester isn’t as straightforward as other, more conventional professions.

You will need to keep an eye out for adverts online – many people find opportunities on sites like Craigslist and university websites. You could also set up a Google Alert for when sleep testing positions open up so you can be the first to be notified.

Alternatively, you could contact mattress companies and hotels directly, and pitch your sleep testing services. You could also set up your own blog, in hopes that you’ll get noticed by big companies who are looking for professional sleep testers.

4. Develop Your Career
There isn’t much scope for career development in this field but if you’re smart, you can save a lot of money by taking part in high-paying studies. You’ll even learn more about your personal skills and qualities while you’re at it. This will, ultimately, give you time and funding to invest in your hobby and turn it into a full-time income source!

Do you think you have what it takes to become a professional sleeper? Let us know your thoughts on this dreamy gig in the comments section below…

This article was originally published in March 2014.

Currency conversions are based on rates supplied by XE.com on 14 May 2018.

via How to Become a Professional Sleeper (Career Path)

10 Amazing Women You’ve Never Heard Of


JONATHAN H. KANTOR 

 

While you’ve probably heard of Rosa Parks, Harriet Tubman, and Susan B. Anthony, history is filled with amazing women whom most people have never heard of. Whether this is due to the misogynistic nature of past historians or simply because people failed to take note of their work while they were alive, many women have not received the recognition they are due.

There are thousands of talented women who have made the world a better place, but these 10 are some of the most influential. Odds are, you haven’t heard of many of them, but all 10 deserve recognition for their work. Due to their incredible accomplishments, these women are presented in no particular order as they stand together equally.

10Jovita Idar

Photo via Wikipedia

Long before the United States considered giving women the right to vote, Jovita Idar was fighting against a patriarchal society that oppressed her for both her femininity and her origins. Born in Laredo, Texas, to Mexican immigrants, Idar grew up in a place and time which wasn’t friendly to Mexican Americans.

In her early career, she became a teacher but was frustrated by the lack of supplies hindering her ability to teach. Seeing her impact diminished, she put her voice to work and became a journalist.

She wrote about inequality and segregation throughout her community. She also supported numerous causes created to help women gain a voice in politics, and she became an outspoken critic of policies she deemed shameful.

While working for the newspaper El Progreso, she called out President Wilson’s dispatch of troops to the southern border, which angered the US Army and the Texas Rangers. The latter came to the newspaper to shut it down.[1]

Refusing to back down, Idar stood in the doorway and kept them from entering. The paper was later shut down, but her defiant stance against the Rangers—all of whom were armed and angry with her—became a symbol of resistance for women and Mexican Americans across the nation.

9Shirley Chisholm

Photo credit: Thomas J. O’Halloran

Throughout her political career, Shirley Chisholm racked up a lot of firsts. She holds the honor of being the first African-American woman elected to the United States Congress, having represented New York’s 12th Congressional District. She retained the office for seven terms between 1969 and 1983.

Not wanting to keep her options limited, she became the first black candidate to vie for a major party’s nomination for the president of the United States in 1972. She was also the first woman to run for the Democratic Party’s nomination for that office.

Chisolm’s work in the Congress established her as a woman of the people. She worked tirelessly on bills supporting a revocation of the draft, an establishment of a minimum wage for domestic workers, and the Equal Rights Amendment.[2]

Her legacy has been credited as helping to “pave the way” for the 2008 Democratic presidential primary battle, which pitted an African American man against a woman. No matter who won that battle, a new “first” would have been achieved. As we all know, the primary’s results helped to establish the first African-American presidency in the United States.

8Sojourner Truth

Photo credit: Randall Studio

Sojourner Truth was born into slavery as Isabella Baumfree in 1797. She escaped following the birth of her daughter in 1826.

She left behind a son but was able to recover him when she successfully sued a white man for his custody in 1828. That made her the first black woman to win a case of that type. Her son Peter had been illegally sold to Alabama from New York following that state’s emancipation.

She continued to work for several years. In 1843, she changed her name to Sojourner Truth and became a Methodist.[3] At this time, she became an outspoken abolitionist and supporter of pacifism and the women’s rights movement. She came into contact with the likes of Frederick Douglass, who influenced her work.

In 1850, she published a memoir titled The Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Northern Slave. The following year, she gave her most famous speech, “Ain’t I a Woman,” at the Ohio Women’s Rights Convention. Her words had an impact and were recalled for decades in both the women’s rights movement as well as the abolitionist movement.

She was chosen as one of the women whose work influenced the Nineteenth Amendment to the US Constitution and will be featured on the back of the $10 bill set for release in 2020.

7Huda Sha’arawi

Photo credit: afrolegends.com

Huda Sha’arawi was born into a wealthy family in Upper Egypt. Her father, Muhammad Sultan, was the first president of the Egyptian Representative Council, so it stands to reason that she grew up comfortably.

While this is true, she was a woman in 19th-century Egypt, which meant she either had to live at home or in a harem. After she was married to her cousin and later separated, she found some independence and furthered her education. This led Sha’arawi to feminism, where she became one of the first women to remove her veil in public. Within a decade, the majority of women in Egypt were doing the same.

She hosted women’s groups in her home and brought other women into public, which was unheard-of at the time. In 1919, she led the first women’s street demonstration during the Egyptian Revolution and was subsequently elected as the president of the Wafdist Women’s Central Committee.[4]

Though few of her demands were ever met by the government in her lifetime, her work for women’s rights helped lay the groundwork for future gains by Egyptian women. She is remembered as one of the earliest leaders of feminism and women’s rights in Egypt by Arab women around the world.

6Lilian Bland

Photo credit: irishtimes.com

While most people know of Amelia Earhart, few recall the accomplishments of Lilian Bland. She was one of the first women in the world to design, build, and fly an airplane.

In 1910, when few had ever seen an airplane, she became interested in flying after receiving a postcard from her uncle in Paris. Determined to fly, she got to work and made a biplane glider which she ironically named Mayfly. The glider worked, but she wanted to achieve powered flight like the Wright Brothers. So she ordered a two-stroke engine. It arrived before the fuel tank, but that didn’t slow her down.

She constructed a tank out of an empty bottle of whiskey and her deaf aunt’s ear trumpet. Although it didn’t work, her perseverance paid off. Once the fuel tank arrived, she became the first woman to fly an aircraft in Ireland.

Her father didn’t like the idea of his daughter flying and offered to buy her a car. It actually worked, and she taught herself to drive. Later, she ran a car dealership in Belfast and became Ford’s first agent in Northern Ireland.

Lilian Bland was always unconventional. But her need to fly helped prove the innovation of women, and she helped inspire others to achieve greatness all over the world.[5]

5Margaret Hamilton

Photo credit: NASA

While everyone knows the name Neil Armstrong, few have ever heard of Margaret Hamilton, the woman who helped take men to the Moon in 1969. Hamilton was the director of the Software Engineering Division of the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory, which created the onboard flight software used by the Apollo space program.

Without her work, NASA would have been unable to navigate to the Moon. Her feat was recognized by President Barack Obama, who awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2016.

Later in her career, she founded and became the CEO of Hamilton Technologies, Inc. The company went on to develop the Universal Systems Language, which has furthered system and software design.

Hamilton is credited with more than 130 published papers and is the woman who coined the phrase “software engineering,” a career which is predominantly held by men. She is one of the leading pioneers in computer science and easily one of the most important people involved with the Apollo missions.[6]

4Roza Shanina

Roza Georgiyevna Shanina was a Soviet sniper who had 59 confirmed kills during World War II. She joined the military in 1941 following the death of her brother.

After volunteering for service, she became a marksman who would serve on the front lines, which was taboo for women. Although she isn’t the first female sniper, she is likely the best in terms of accuracy and number of kills in combat. During the Battle of Vilnius, she racked up 12 kills alone and became proficient in making doublets, which is hitting two targets with a single bullet.

She was the first female Soviet sniper to receive the Order of Glory, awarded for bravery in the face of the enemy. Her exploits were glorified in a Canadian newspaper in 1944 when she was called “the unseen terror of East Prussia.”

Shanina was killed in action when she covered an already wounded artillery unit commander, saving him from further injury. She is fondly remembered in Russia as a hero of the Soviet Union. She fought at a time when women were rarely considered for combat roles and when female snipers were traditionally removed from the front lines. But her abilities and accomplishments speak for themselves.[7]

3Niloofar Rahmani

Photo credit: news.com.au

Prior to the US and allied invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, women were not allowed to do much in the country. They were forbidden from attending school beyond age eight and were unable to hold office, leave the house without an escort, or pretty much do anything they wanted.

Since the fall of the Taliban, things have changed. Niloofar Rahmani has established herself as the first female fixed-wing air force aviator in the country’s history. She is also the first female pilot in the Afghan military. Although she and her family have received death threats, she has persisted.[8]

Rahmani has been recognized internationally for her perseverance in attaining her role as the first woman to pilot an aircraft in the Afghan military. The US State Department gave her their International Women of Courage Award in 2015.

Following the international recognition she received, the death threats intensified and Rahmani remained in the US. She applied for and received asylum in the United States in 2018 and plans to become a military pilot in the United States Air Force.

2Belva Ann Lockwood

Photo credit: Mathew Brady

Long before women were given the right to vote in the United States, women like Belva Ann Lockwood were fighting for women’s rights. Lockwood graduated from law school and became one of the first women to practice law in the United States.

Though she wasn’t the first to practice, she did attain the distinction of becoming the first woman to successfully petition Congress in 1879 to practice before the United States Supreme Court. At that time, women weren’t even allowed to cast a ballot in the country. But she stood before the Supreme Court, which is an honor few attorneys ever achieve.

Lockwood ran for president of the United States in both 1884 and 1888 on the National Equal Rights Party ticket. Although she failed to win those elections, she did become the first woman to officially appear on a national ballot.

Lockwood has been honored for her achievements long after her death in 1917. Her likeness has been carved into ship figureheads and has appeared on United States Postal Service stamps. Ships have been named in her honor, and she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1983.[9]

1Hedy Lamarr

Photo credit: newsdigitali.com

To be fair, you’ve probably heard of Hedy Lamarr. She was a famous Hollywood actress who was once called “the most beautiful woman in the world.” But that’s not what she should be recognized for.

Lamarr was an inventor, and her work helped develop the technology on which you may be reading this article. During World War II, Lamarr helped to develop frequency-hopping spread spectrum for radio signals, which was meant to be used in the development of torpedoes.

Torpedoes were nothing new, but they were susceptible to jamming until her technology could be implemented. Unfortunately, the navy didn’t take her work seriously until the 1960s when it was finally used in most of their communications tech. That technology became the underlying concept used by the cell phone network, Bluetooth, CDMA, and Wi-Fi communications.[10]

Her inventions revolutionized the world, and she was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014. Her work in Hollywood is certainly noteworthy. But given her contributions to science and technology, she deserves widespread recognition for her accomplishments outside the industry.