Good Behavioural Science and marketing links

The Persuasion Code Part 1, with Christophe Morin
Christophe Morin, co-author of the first neuromarketing book and now The Persuasion Code, is the neuroscience half of the SalesBrain duo. He digs into the science that underlies a pain-based approach to sales and persuasion. Read more…

The Paper Towel Test For Customer Experience

Want a clue as to how a business that claims to be customer-focused really feels about its customers? Check their approach to dispensing paper towels! Read more…

The Persuasion Code Part 2, with Patrick Renvoise

In the second part of our Persuasion Code series, co-author Patrick Renvoise joins us to share how years of experimentation and client testing have shown what really works in persuasion and sales.  Read More…

Transforming Customer Experience with Carnival’s John Padgett
How do you take the best customer experience and make it even better. John Padgett has done it twice, first at Disney and now at Carnival. It starts with rethinking every aspect of the customer’s journey. Read more…

How many really bad presentations have you sat through. David Hooker, evangelist for upstart presentation Prezi, tells you how to engage your audience and ensure they remember your message. Read more…

Behavioral Science in Business

It’s almost here! Learn from the best minds applying behavioral science to business! Save 20% with code “ROGER” and support the amazing work of TakeHerBack at the same time.

Be a Five-Star Communicator with Carmine Gallo
Crush your next presentation, whether it’s an auditorium or cramped conference room. Speaking expert Carmine Gallo has deconstructed successful TED talks and other speeches to teach you what works! Read more…

Futurist and author Thomas Koulopoulos paints a future both scary and exciting in Revealing the Invisible – AI-driven behavior analysis, hyper-personalization, even consumer “mind-reading.”  Read More…

Clockwork – Design Your Business To Run Itself

Mike Michalowicz is back to teach you the ultimate entrepreneural secret – how to get your business to run itself. Mike’s new book is Clockwork, and he shares ideas in the way that only he can. Read more…

Study: Surprise Winner In Audio vs Video For Emotion
Would an emotionally charged scene from Game of Throneslight up your brain more if you saw the scene on video or heard the passage from the book via audio? This and other tests yielded surprising results.  Read More…

The 1-Page Marketing Plan with Allan Dib

Forget big marketing plans that gather dust on your shelf. Business coach Allan Dib explains why one page is enough, and tells you the exact steps to creating your 1-page plan.  Read more…

Topple: Explosive Growth via Ecosystem Thinking
The days of the standalong business are numbered, says author and futurist Ralph Welborn. In Topple, he explains why you need to be part of an ecosystem that will feed your business new opportunities. Read more…

Real Artists Don’t Starve with Jeff Goins

If you are a creator of any kind – writer, musician, painter, etc. – don’t fall for the “starving artist” myth. Author Jeff Goins gives practical examples showing how you can make your art and prosper financially, too! Read more…

Is your marketing budget maxed out? Do you need more sales? If you like my Neuromarketing, Entrepreneur and Forbes articles, you’ll definitely enjoy Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing (Wiley). It’s full of practical, ways to use behavior research, neuroscience, and psychology to make your marketing more persuasive! Get Brainfluence…

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Competing for Shoppers’ Habits

Global Consumer Insights Survey

via Competing for Shoppers’ Habits

4 Secret Selling Techniques You Must Implement

 

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691

Summary:

To reach our business goals we need right resources and/or the insights to help our business reach the success it’s capable of.  Following four insights will help us generate the business we’ve always dreamed of.

Article Body:

1.  Experiment with New Advertising Methods

 

A sharp decline in the effectiveness of our advertising campaign is usually the the first sign that we might need to explore new marketing strategies We shell out and ( as critics say – BURN) hard earned cash to advertise, and pubic turns its nose up! Procrastinating till our profits are plunging to start hunting for new marketing strategies is futile.

What could possibly be these foolproof selling techniques? Yeah, no more customers walking out with empty hands… no more profits disappearing into thin air! Share below,  are 4 secrets that will help you put money in your pocket, and enhance your current customer list and augment, hyperscale your business.

 

1. Make It Easy


While the old adage – variety is the spice of life is true;  giving customers too many choices can lead them into indecision or procrastination. We know, very well;  when customers procrastinate … we lose sale!

Imagine a customer walks into shop / the point of purchase, your business premises; and is ready to purchase, and suddenly sees several options he didn’t know existed, he’ll stop, and then decide… which one?   If he’s uncertain… well, you lose a sale that was already in your pocket.

Make it easy for your customers to decide… yes, I’ll buy it… no I won’t buy it.  Yes and no decisions are a lot easier to make, and are more likely to put cash in the drawer.

 

2. Offer Several Ways To Buy

 

Too many choices can overwhelm customers and can cost you sales.  These options of how to buy may open up avenues for customers to purchase the product they’ve decided they need. They say there are different strokes for different folks… your customers don’t all use same methods to buy.  It just makes sense that if the method they prefer is available, they’ll be more likely to take advantage of it.

Convenience it the key to attracting buyers in today’s fast paced society.  What will be the fastest and easiest for them… credit card, phone, fax, Internet, or cold hard cash?

 

3. Keep it Simple

Do you remember the frustration of spending 10 minutes pushing buttons on the phone just to get through a pain-in-the-neck automated ordering service.  Heck, you just wanted to buy that one item!  Maybe it was the time you had to click your finger raw, just to jump through the hoops of an online shopping cart.  Yeah, the temptation to just forget it is right there!

Don’t frustrate your customers with intricate ordering processes.  Most likely, they just want to place the order in a few minutes and be done.  Let them get frustrated, and they’ll go elsewhere, or just abandon the idea altogether.

4. Follow Up

One of my favorite catalog companies always closes out the sale with a special buy that is available only at the time of purchase.  I’m an impulsive shopper by  but it stops me in my tracks every time.  I know it’s a one-time shot, and I really consider whether I want or need it before I hang up the phone.

How many items would your customers buy if you were to follow up every sale with a special offer?  Internet marketers have a world of options at their fingertips.  The products you offer don’t even have to be yours… and you can still make a profit!

Affiliate marketing is sweeping the Web.  Think about it… would your customers benefit from an ebook that deals with the product they are purchasing?  You can offer it to them, and let the owner handle ordering process while you collect the commission.  It’s as easy as 1, 2, and 3 and profitable too!

Boosting your sales numbers and profits isn’t as tough as it sounds.  Implement these 4 simple selling techniques, and watch your sales steadily climb… and just think… they didn’t cost you a penny!

 

A psychotherapist explains the 5 stages of changing behavior | Ladders

THE WHOLE HUMAN
A psychotherapist explains the 5 stages of changing your behavior
By Katherine Schafler
Aug 17, 2018

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Wait, just thinking about changing is a stage of change? That’s how you start to change — by thinking about it without doing anything?

YES.

The idea that just thinking about what you want to change is an actual stage of change is so rational and obvious after the fact (of course you need to think about what you want to change and how you want to change it before you actually do it), but in the midst of contemplating change most people encounter this sentiment:

All I do is think about changing X and talk about changing X but I don’t actually do it.

This creates stuckness and a negative self-fulfilling prophecy.

You tell yourself over and over again that you’re not someone who does anything to change, you just think about it a ton, and then you become someone who doesn’t do anything to change and who just thinks about it a ton.

Breaking that cycle starts with a deeper understanding of what the process of change actually looks like.

Deliberate change comes in 5 stages:

1. Pre-contemplation
You’re not even thinking about changing. An example of this is a woman who’s dating a man who isn’t great for her, but she’s having fun dating him anyway. She doesn’t think he’s not great for her, she doesn’t think he’s a bad or incompatible choice. She’s just enjoying being around him.

2. Contemplation
In this stage, it’s likely that a few things have happened which have catalyzed some thoughts around whether you should change something. Using the prior example, the woman might have noticed a few things about the man she’s dating that she doesn’t like. She might be starting to ask herself questions like, Where is this going? … What am I doing? … Well he’s really great at X but not so great at Y … Why am I putting up with this? … Is he enough for me? … Am I really happy with this situation?

You don’t actually change anything in the second stage.

You basically just think about what your life would be like if you continued doing the exact same things, what your life would be like if you decided to change and the ways by which that potential change might occur.

3. Preparation
This is when you’ve decided you want to change and you go into preparation mode.

You might ask around about how other people have successfully changed and announce to others that you’ve decided to change in order to hold yourself accountable to it. You might read books or blog posts on change, you might make purchases for yourself that make it easier to enable and stick to the change you want (cough, lululemon, cough).

4. Action
The action stage is marked by actual behavioral changes.

This is the stage that most people associate with change because it’s the stage that’s most visible.

In our example, this is the stage where you have the tough conversation and you break up.

5. Maintenance
A crucial and often overlooked stage.

It can take so long to realize you need to change ‘for real’ as well as to take the actionable steps to change, that by the time you get to the maintenance stage it’s easier to think the tough work is behind you.

NOPE.

Ironically, this is the stage that often requires the most support.

Relapsing (i.e. going back on your decision to change) is usually a natural part of this stage that is misinterpreted as failure.

When you have support through the maintenance stage, you learn to prevent, examine and explore your relapses, mining for the loopholes that you then begin to tie off.

With the exception of pre-contemplation, all the stages of change require a great deal of work, attention, time and energy. Thinking is included in this work. It’s hard to encounter conflicting thoughts about what you want and then reconcile the dissension.

Figuring out what you really, truly want can be challenging enough — implementing and maintaining the changes you’ve decided upon can be even more so. #5 of my ten tenets especially applies here, and if it applies to you, recruit support.

Katherine Schafler is an NYC-based psychotherapist, writer, and speaker.  For more of her work, join her newsletter community, read her blog, or follow her on Instagram.

via A psychotherapist explains the 5 stages of changing behavior | Ladders

Influence Bartering – good ebook on Changethis

“There are billions of blogs out there on WordPress alone, as I turned to see the WordPress Reader.  It has never been easier to turn our expertise into a revenue stream of Best Friends, Followers and Fans who turn your customers OR one can become an  an influencer to help others.  I choose to do the later. Become an Influencer to my BFFFs and be their BFFF and be influenced by many of them.

The Important question is: What exactly are influencers and why are they important? As a general principle, an influencer is someone who has influence.  You’ll say “I know, I know, it isn’t very helpful to define a word by using the same word”, but it is really that simple. WOMM  or the Word-of-mouth marketing isn’t new and it’s the driving force behind consumer habits, whether it’s buying a product, watching a show, or just downloading an app.

In today’s digital world, the word ‘influencer’ is ascribed to someone with clout through digital channels, or ‘social currency.’ ! (  In this bitcoin Age! ) Whether one has a lot of followers or really high engagement, when they speaks, audience listens, they act, and—most importantly to brands—they buy.”

I read the ChangeThis.com recently and found an excellent ebook on Influence Bartering. Worth a Read.

How Behavioral Economics Could Help Reduce Credit Card Delinquency

How Behavioral Economics Could Help Reduce Credit Card Delinquency
Nina Mažar
JULY 26, 2018
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With U.S. household credit card debt at an all-time high of more than $1 trillion, delinquent payments can be more costly than ever. For companies, delinquencies can mean massive collection costs and write-offs of entire accounts. For consumers, delinquency can mean late fees, increased interest rates, downgraded credit scores, the loss of vehicles or homes, or even bankruptcy, despite their intentions to bring their accounts current by making a payment large enough to satisfy their credit card balance. Recent research indicates that simple modifications of automated phone prompts provide an inexpensive way for companies to help consumers make good on their intentions, benefiting both parties.

My colleagues Daniel Mochon and Dan Ariely and I collaborated with a large North American store that offers credit cards, aiming to study how to get recently delinquent customers to pay at least a portion of their balance. These are customers who have just missed paying at least their minimum payment and are therefore considered one month delinquent. Most credit card companies, including our collaborating card company, use interactive voice recordings (IVRs) — large-volume automated phone calls — to remind early-stage delinquent customers to pay. This assumes that there are only two groups of delinquent customers: those who are unable to pay and those who simply forgot. To take care of those who forgot, a short automated reminder is thought to suffice: “[Customer name], you have a past due amount. If you have already paid, press 1. If you are going to pay within the next three days, press 2. If you want to speak to an agent, press 3.”

However, we know from many other domains of life that people can have the best of intentions but fail to follow through on them. For example, many of us intend to save more money, live a healthier lifestyle, or start working on our taxes early instead of at the last minute. But life gets in the way; we procrastinate and end up not doing what we intended to do. My colleagues and I thought that this might also be true for some of the delinquent credit card customers. So we tested two separate modifications to the baseline IVR to see if they would help overcome this type of inaction in the case of recipients who indicated they would pay within the next three days.

Our first modified version added an interactive menu level that asked call recipients to select a concrete timeframe within which they would make their payment during the ensuing three days: “If you are going to pay within the next 24 hours, press 1” and so on, continuing through 36, 48, and 72 hours. We expected this intervention to prompt deeper mental engagement that would help them remember their intention.

Our second modified version added yet another interactive menu level right after this new one. Call recipients were asked to take a personalized pledge: “[Customer name], you have committed to pay [total amount due] within the next 24 hours. Press 1 to confirm your commitment to this pledge.” The idea was to strengthen call recipients’ sense of commitment to their expressed intention.

Over nine months we randomly assigned a small subgroup of the company’s early-stage delinquent customers, around 50,000 people, to one of the three IVRs. We found that compared with the baseline IVR, the prompt with the concrete timeframe increased customers’ likelihood to pay by 2.26 percentage points and led them to pay 0.23 days faster. Adding both the concrete timeframe prompt and the pledge increased the likelihood by 2.54 percentage points and the speed by 0.51 days.

What does this mean in dollars? The people in our small subgroup had a mean total amount due of $142. Some 15,000 indicated they would pay within the next three days. If all 15,000 had received the IVR with the timeframe prompt and pledge, instead of the baseline IVR, the improvement in response would have translated into an increase in immediate revenue of more than $56,000.

When scaled to a credit card company’s entire customer population, these interventions could result in significant revenue increases. Moreover, additional customers become delinquent every day, increasing the long-term revenue benefits of such interventions. In addition, they cost little, they scale easily, and they reduce more-costly later-stage collection efforts, which can include letters, live agent calls, and collection agency fees. Meanwhile, consumers benefit from avoiding the costs associated with debt delinquency.

These results demonstrate that even simple, minimal prompts delivered through automated, high-volume IVR calls can bridge the intention-action gap that so often prevents people from completing beneficial behaviors. Asking people to express their intentions more precisely about when they will act and to take a pledge could work in areas ranging from tax compliance to medication adherence to students’ procrastination on assignments. More generally, the results affirm that applying behavioral insights has great potential for increasing economic and individual well-being at low cost, as the recent work of Daniel Kahneman, Steven Levitt, Cass Sunstein, Richard Thaler, and others has shown.

Nina Mažar is Professor of Marketing and Co-Director of the Susilo Institute for Ethics in the Global Economy at Questrom School of Business, Boston University, and co-founder (with Dan Ariely) of BEworks, a behavioral economics consultancy.

via How Behavioral Economics Could Help Reduce Credit Card Delinquency