Indian salesman – a WhatsApp friendly forward received


An Indian left his job and joined salesman’s job in a big department stores in Canada.

Boss :- Do you have any experience?

Indian : Yes a little too much…

On the first day, that Indian worked with full mind.

At 6 pm the Boss :- How many sales did you sell on the first day today?

Indian : Sir I sold 1

Boss : Only 1 sale ??? Usually every salesman working here does 20 to 30 sales daily. Well, tell me how much money did you sell ???

Indian : $93300 dollars.

Boss : What ??? But how did you do it?

Indian : 1 person came and I sold him a small fishing hook.
Then a mazola and then finally sold a big hook. Then I sold him 1 big fishing rods and some fishing gear.

Then I asked him where do you go to catch fish and he said in the coastal area….

Then I said it would need a boat. So I took him down to the boat department and sold him a 20 ft double engine scooner boat.

When he said this boat won’t come in his Volkas Wagon, I took him to the auto mobile section and sold him the new Deluxe 4 x 4 blazer to carry the boat.
And when I asked him where would be going fishing ??? He didn’t plan anything. So I took him to the camping section and sold him a six sleeper camper tent.

And then he said when he took all that he would take $ 200 groceries and 2 cases of beer.

Now the boss took 2 steps back and asked in a very rude way :- You sold all this to the man who came to buy only 1 fish hook???

Indian : “NO, SIR…” He only came to take 1 tablet for the headache…. I explained to him that fishing is the best way to get rid of headaches.

Boss : Where did you work before ??? In India???

Indian : Yes, I was a doctor in a private hospital : On a minor complaint of panic, we get the patients tested for pathology, ECO, ECG, TMT, CT scan, X-ray, MRI etc.

Boss : You sit on my chair. I am going to join a private hospital for training in India.
😄😄🤪

$265Billion Dollar Economic Package instalment 10% of Indian GDP announced.


Someone summarised PM’s speech for me as I found the PM address full of Hindi, Sanskrit, english jargons which a layman, a man on the street, a common man can never understand. Or perhaps Narendra Modi did not wish them to address.
Such a disjointed/ In-silo effort at speech making – even when BJP has such stalwarts as wonderful Editors like M J Akbar to name a few…. who could have helped make a simple impactful speech. But bygones are bygones. Here is the Excerpt:
Honorable PM address to the Nation 🇮🇳 12.05.2020@ 8.00 pm. Highlights(33 minutes)

✅COVID19 virus has destroyed the entire world
✅COVID19 crisis is unprecedented
✅we must save lives and move forward
✅will have to take firm oath,move
✅Need to move ahead with protection
✅Self Reliant India ,the way ahead. Self Reliance has a new meaning now
✅Before covid we didn’t produce PPEs
✅Now we make 2.00 lakhs PPEs daily
✅The world view of India has changed
✅World has hope in our Capabilities -world believe India
✅Walking on the path Global welfare
✅INDIA has best resources
✅Nothing is difficult to India and Indians
✅5 pillar of India’s self reliance
Economy,Infrastructure,Tech driven-System,Demography,Demand
✅ Special Economic package announced (Rs20.00 Lakhs crore)10% of India’s GDP
✅ Aatmanirbhar Bharath relief package
✅Fiance Ministry will issue detailed guidelines on special package
✅ Give prominence/promote to products manufactured in India. Request to all to buy products manufactured in India
✅ Lockdown 4.0 details will be announced before 18th May 2020(State specific)
✅Respect and honour to all the people who are helped/ helping to fight COVID19

Thank you all 🇮🇳🙏

When leaders forget what audience they are addressing,

When they forget the impact it makes on their audience, the masses,

They speak floral, literary or JARGON FILLED language.

Someone behind the scenes also wishes to DILUTE the PM and his image by making him appear in such quick succession as if they have his succession (God forbid) Plan ready. Sad.

The HM as usual is dragging his feet with his procrastinating, definition loving Bureaucrazy Secretaries and not ready with the Graded Lockdown 4.0 announcements and PM could have therefore avoided even a mention about it as it is likely to come on 1or before 18th so let HM do it, No?

Why take out the LAST THUNDER of this inefficient FM of India by stealing her last attempt at providing ECONOMIC PACKAGE calling it Party’s or BJP’s or NDAs or PMs rather than RBI’s. – PM Could well have avoided the mention as he is not a Hype creator for FM but someone people of India look up to with respect for COMMUNICATING DECISIONS.

All in all, I personally was very disappointed and disgusted at the poor media management by BJP and Government as they ended up Diluting the Best TRUMP CARD they have till 2024 Elections.

As a senior Citizen – I have lost my Interest income 45% in past 7 years of Modi Government and continued to pay taxes.  I am still unclear, WHAT IS IN THIS PACKAGE FOR ME AND MY ilk of 12. 1 Crore Senior citizens, veterans in India. We are also 10% of Indian population – well, nearly.

The Courage to Be Yourself: E.E. Cummings on Art, Life, and Being Unafraid to Feel – Brain Pickings


via The Courage to Be Yourself: E.E. Cummings on Art, Life, and Being Unafraid to Feel – Brain Pickings

“To be nobody-but-yourself — in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else — means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight.”

“No one can build you the bridge on which you, and only you, must cross the river of life,”wrote the thirty-year-old Nietzsche. “The true and durable path into and through experience,” Nobel-winning poet Seamus Heaney counseled the young more than a century later in his magnificent commencement address“involves being true … to your own solitude, true to your own secret knowledge.”

Every generation believes that it must battle unprecedented pressures of conformity; that it must fight harder than any previous generation to protect that secret knowledge from which our integrity of selfhood springs. Some of this belief stems from the habitual conceit of a culture blinded by its own presentism bias, ignorant of the past’s contextual analogues. But much of it in the century and a half since Nietzsche, and especially in the years since Heaney, is an accurate reflection of the conditions we have created and continually reinforce in our present informational ecosystem — a Pavlovian system of constant feedback, in which the easiest and commonest opinions are most readily rewarded, and dissenting voices are most readily punished by the unthinking mob.

E.E. Cummings by Edward Weston (Photograph courtesy of the Center for Creative Photography)
E.E. Cummings by Edward Weston (Photograph courtesy of the Center for Creative Photography)

Few people in the two centuries since Emerson issued his exhortation to “trust thyself” have countered this culturally condoned blunting of individuality more courageously and consistently than E.E. Cummings (October 14, 1894–September 3, 1962) — an artist who never cowered from being his unconventional self because, in the words of his most incisive and competent biographer, he “despised fear, and his life was lived in defiance of all who ruled by it.”

A fortnight after the poet’s fifty-ninth birthday, a small Michigan newspaper published a short, enormous piece by Cummings under the title “A Poet’s Advice to Students,” radiating expansive wisdom on art, life, and the courage of being yourself. It went on to inspire Buckminster Fuller and was later included in E.E. Cummings: A Miscellany Revised (public library) — that wonderful out-of-print collection which the poet himself described as “a cluster of epigrams, forty-nine essays on various subjects, a poem dispraising dogmata, and several selections from unfinished plays,” and which gave us Cummings on what it really means to be an artist.

Illustration from Enormous Smallness by Matthew Burgess, an illustrated tribute to E.E. Cummings

Addressing those who aspire to be poets — no doubt in that broadest Baldwinian sense of wakeful artists in any medium and courageous seers of human truth — Cummings echoes the poet Laura Riding’s exquisite letters to an eight-year-old girl about being oneself and writes:

A poet is somebody who feels, and who expresses his feelings through words.

This may sound easy. It isn’t.

A lot of people think or believe or know they feel — but that’s thinking or believing or knowing; not feeling. And poetry is feeling — not knowing or believing or thinking.

Almost anybody can learn to think or believe or know, but not a single human being can be taught to feel. Why? Because whenever you think or you believe or you know, you’re a lot of other people: but the moment you feel, you’re nobody-but-yourself.

To be nobody-but-yourself — in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else — means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.

Page from Enormous Smallness by Matthew Burgess

Cummings should know — just four years earlier, he had fought that hardest battle himself: When he was awarded the prestigious Academy of American Poets annual fellowship — the MacArthur of poetry — Cummings had to withstand harsh criticism from traditionalists who besieged him with hate for the bravery of breaking with tradition and being nobody-but-himself in his art. With an eye to that unassailable creative integrity buoyed by relentless work ethic, he adds:

As for expressing nobody-but-yourself in words, that means working just a little harder than anybody who isn’t a poet can possibly imagine. Why? Because nothing is quite as easy as using words like somebody else. We all of us do exactly this nearly all of the time — and whenever we do it, we’re not poets.

If, at the end of your first ten or fifteen years of fighting and working and feeling, you find you’ve written one line of one poem, you’ll be very lucky indeed.

And so my advice to all young people who wish to become poets is: do something easy, like learning how to blow up the world — unless you’re not only willing, but glad, to feel and work and fight till you die.

Does that sound dismal? It isn’t.

It’s the most wonderful life on earth.

Or so I feel.

Complement the thoroughly invigorating E.E. Cummings: A Miscellany Revised with a lovely illustrated celebration of Cummings’s creative bravery, then revisit Pulitzer-winning poet Robert Penn Warren on what it really means to find yourself and Janis Joplin on the courage of being what you find.

This 10-minute routine will increase confidence and self-esteem | Ladders


According to Dr. Martin Seligman, former president of the American Psychological Association, there are several differences between optimists and pessimists.

Pessimists

Pessimists explain negative events as a permanent fixture of their identity (something they can’t change). They view themselves (or life in general) as the problem, and there is nothing that can really be done.
Optimists

Optimists explain negative events as situation and short-lived. When something goes wrong, they focus on situational factors that can be altered and improved.

via This 10-minute routine will increase confidence and self-esteem | Ladders

Meher baba on Indian Independence


Shireen Davenport

Meher Baba on Independence on 4 September 1931,

“Baba remarked, “If Gandhi comes to meet me, it would be very good for him and good for all concerned.”

About the Round Table Conference, Baba explained to Chanji and Rustom:

Even Gandhi will have no influence there, in spite of his presence. He should have gone at first with other representatives who, in a wavering mood, left for Multan; but at that time, Gandhi hesitated on account of certain grievances. Then he suddenly agreed to participate in the conference, though most of their grievances were not redressed.

The point is that once Gandhi refused to join in the conference on certain grounds, he ought to have refused to the end. He should not have suddenly consented to take part in it unless and until all his grievances were redressed and removed, and he should have stayed in India. But being inconsistent, he consented to attend the conference at the eleventh hour. He has lost his prestige and now he won’t succeed there. At the Round Table Conference, differences of opinion will prevail among the parties and no one will agree, and Gandhi’s influence will not make a difference. His influence will be ineffectual.

“Why?” asked Chanji.

In reply, Baba spelled out:

Gandhi’s influence has already waned. He wants to keep every party pleased and there[in] lies his weakness. How could he keep everybody pleased when they all are opposed to one another and have conflicting views, extremely opposite to each other?

In India, the many political parties and creeds all have one common aim: to attain independence. But there is not a single party among them who can come to terms with another party about details. Even the [Indian National] Congress, the party considered strongest, is affected by the foul odor of religious differences.

Its influence on others is gradually failing. With the weakening of its influence, the influence of Gandhi is also waning. Not only are the two greatest and largest parties and communities, the Muslims and the Untouchables, out of the influence of the Congress, but they also oppose and fight tooth and nail against Gandhi and the Congress.

Even among his own followers, or those who at least agree with him on the question of independence, their objectives differ. Observe how Sarojini Naidu and Pandit Malaviya act. Gandhi preaches the use of khadi [handspun cotton cloth] to all and sundry, yet Mrs. Naidu wears silks, though she is a colleague in his fight for independence. Gandhi preaches and advocates the abolition of caste and religion, particularly in abolishing Untouchability, and his lieutenant in the Congress Party, Malaviya, does not adhere to it. Malaviya takes his cook to England with him, thinking that eating meals prepared by foreigners is irreligious. There are thousands in the Congress who do not accept this dictum of Gandhi’s at all, and that is why the party is not strong; the result of which will bode ill for the future.

Gandhi also advocates celibacy, though he himself is married and has children, and recently he arranged his son’s marriage. There are so many things like these which he recommends, but does not put into practice himself. Why preach such things which he himself can’t or won’t do?

It is this trait in his character, combined with two other great defects — vanity and inconsistency — which causes Gandhi to lose his influence gradually, and leads those who once admired him to oppose him today. Shaukat Ali was once Gandhi’s closest companion and he is now his staunchest opponent. Why? Because of that great dividing factor: the religious animosity and enmity between the Hindus and Muslims. The religious fanatics on both sides have nurtured and fostered this hatred to the extent that even in Congress there are the orthodox who color every political activity and action with their religious bigotry, and it is all authorized, approved and practiced by and with Gandhi. This leads to great antagonism which is now weakening the Congress party.

What can I say about [Gandhi’s] vanity? Too much of a thing always spoils a man. To raise one to the seventh heaven and to cry out “Mahatma Gandhi ki jai” has made him vain and brought him down.

Shaukat Ali has caustically remarked, “These things have gone to his head and made him [Gandhi] mad!”

Besides, his immediate attendants put up a great show and fuss in every activity, which shows that Gandhi has a taste for it. But it is the natural outcome of too much praise and adulation. This daily exhibition in all functions, public and private, has reached the limit. It is too prominent to conceal from a shrewd observer or a sincere soul, who never likes or desires such a show. Hence, there is the dislike of him by many who, in spite of their admiration for him at one point, have left and are leaving him in [droves].

The Perfect Master of Spirituality can do anything and everything. He can preach about things which he himself does not practice, and for his spiritual purposes he can do things according to the prevailing conditions and circumstances, because he is eternally free of all things and can undo their effects. This is something an imperfect person can never do, much less one who has no “wind” [breeze] even of spirituality [such as a political leader, like Gandhi].

The reactionary effects of all these preachings, fuss, sham, show and vanity are disastrous, causing a gradual erosion of any influence Gandhi has among his admirers and followers, however great. If Gandhi’s influence goes, the rise of youth will take place, which in its activity will resemble Russian communalism. The signs are already there, as we find them assassinating people in high places and assaulting them in broad daylight.

Although Jawaharlal [Nehru] sides with Gandhi in his objective for independence, his views, creed and activities are quite different from Gandhi’s.

On the 5th, regarding Britain, Baba said:

The British government will not grant anything more than what was settled on in the last Round Table Conference. There is a change of government and, except for [Prime Minister] MacDonald, no one has any sympathy for our cause. Gandhi, too, will not gain anything more by his presence than what has already been decided to be given. His personality and influence will have no effect at all. And if Gandhi tries to give in again to avoid a conflict, the Congress will not accept it.

Baba predicted a civil war erupting in India between Hindus and Muslims. “There will be a terrible massacre and slaughter of one another,” he stated. “It will also have its reflection on Europeans.

There will be an equally strong civil war between the Indians and foreigners, particularly the Europeans and more particularly the British.”

On the 7th, Baba said:

The common cause of nationalism and the objective of achieving independence are sacrificed for want of unity between the Hindus and the Mohammedans, and they are harming their own cause by bringing religion into the matter. No one understands religion, and all this strife and squabble is born of irreligiousness.

Gandhi, who goes to England as the chosen leader of the Congress and the spokesman for India, this time will have no influence, unfortunately, owing to various reasons of conflicting ideals and party politics. Not only will his influence fail with the British people, but his influence will fall considerably even with his own people, the Indians, to the extent of failure. And with Gandhiji’s influence gone, and “communalism” coming in, civil war will follow.

This is all very sad for poor India and for Britain, too. But sadder times are still to come before the sun of the New Era of peace and prosperity dawns on the world, for such is ordained.”

Revised Lord Meher, pp. 1237-1240, copyright AMBPPCT
photo: Meher Baba, 1931
copyright Meher Nazar Publications or MSI Collection

Random Acts of Kindness – Choose one. I have.


  1. Remember to turn the lights off when you leave a room!
  2. Make your voice count – sign a petition for a good cause
  3. Support a small, local business as a customer
  4. It’s hard to stay connected – reach out to an elderly person you know
  5. Visit a friend who’s sick
  6. Hug your parents
  7. Compliment someone today!
  8. Start the day right – make breakfast for everyone
  9. Send a thank you card to someone who has made a difference in your life (a friend, family member, teacher etc.)
  10. Leave a kind message anywhere (in a library book, on a computer etc.)

RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS. Keep at it!


  1. Help someone carry their pushchair up/down the stairs
  2. Volunteer your time for a good cause
  3. Make a hot beverage for a friend/family
  4. We all need help sometimes; offer someone a helping hand
  5. Surprise your parents with flowers
  6. Oooh wait! There’s somebody behind you; hold the door open!
  7. Someone looking lost? Help them with directions
  8. Bake something for your family/friends
  9. Read a good book recently? Pass it on to someone else
  10. Who will be making dinner for your family today? Tag, you’re it!

From Longitude a newsletter I subscribe


  • July 26, 2018

Looking at the Aging Workforce through a New Lens

When hiring managers mobilize older workers, it’s a win-win.

Many businesses are facing a critical shortage of experienced professionals, with industries such as accounting citing lack of skilled personnel as the No. 1 challenge for three quarters in a row. Much of the conversation is centered on the skills gap, high retirement rates for so-called boomers and the inability to find the skills employers are looking for in the younger workforce.

Pullquote share icon.ShareBy 2020, more than 50 percent of the workforce will be over the age of 55.

What employers must realize is that even though boomers are retiring from the office, they aren’t leaving the workforce.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), about 40 percent of people ages 55 and older were working or actively looking for work in 2014. That number, known as a labor force participation rate, is expected to increase fastest for the oldest segments of the population – most notably, people ages 65 to 74 and 75 and older – through 2024.

In contrast, participation rates for most other age groups in the labor force aren’t projected to change much over the 2014 to 2024 decade. Another study from Prudential found that one-third of independent contractors are boomers – a subset of the economy gearing up to be a mighty and powerful force.

For hiring managers to attract top talent, they must view the aging workforce through a new lens. Today, we consider those 65-plus to be “older” and less skilled or capable. But we must shift our perspective on age.

The average life expectancy for a man is 80 years old, and for a woman, the average is 85 years. A 50 year old, therefore, is no longer a “senior.”

A shift in perspective

By 2020, more than 50 percent of the workforce will be over the age of 55. We have CEOs and politicians in their 70s and still at the top of their game.

In fact, recent research on the aging brain found that past the age of 50, our brains get better at problem-solving and decision making, skills that will be crucial as AI becomes more prevalent.

Pullquote share icon.ShareVintage employeeshave a high level of job commitment, employer loyalty and diverse knowledge.

In 2017, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) received 18,376 claims of age discrimination and found that 65 percent of older workers say age is a barrier to getting a job.

Employers that recognize this challenge, and the opportunity that comes with hiring “vintage” employees, are finding new talent with a high level of job commitment, employer loyalty, openness to mentor a younger generation of professionals and a diverse knowledge base that can be applied to a variety of business challenges.

Let skills speak for themselves

The process of hiring a vintage employee is not the same as any other job candidate, but organizations like Work at Home Vintage Experts (WAHVE) are dedicated to carefully matching older, qualified professionals to the talent needs of companies. They help employers overcome the preconceived notion of an older workforce, using blind hiring practices to let competencies and skills speak for themselves.

When hiring managers mobilize the older workforce, it’s a win-win. Companies get highly skilled workers with the talent they need, and retiring workers get to continue their career.

This article originally appeared on the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation blog and was republished with permission.

Sharon Emek is founder, CEO and President of Work At Home Vintage Experts (WAHVE).Click the RSS icon to subscribe to future articles by this author. RSS Feed

I’m Out! – A Didactic Cinquain by Jay


I’m Out! – A Didactic Cinquain

by Jay

I’m Out!
Spiffing, weirdo
Snapping, walloping shock, humungous banging
Such feelings of pain
Out Cold

The Mentor and the MonaLisa Rhyming Couplet Ideas -Ver 1.0 by Jay


The Mentor and the MonaLisa

Rhyming Couplet Ideas by Jay

See the snuffing of the Mentor,
I think he’s angry at the core.

He finds it hard to see the accidental,
Overshadowed by the brainy rental.

Who is that practicing near the coat?
I think she’d like to eat the goat.

She is but a cunning rani,
Admired as she sits upon a sirianni.

Her crazed Snake is just a Car,
It needs no gas, it runs on double Bar.

She’s not alone she brings a Helix,
a pet Frog, and lots of felix.

The Frog likes to chase a Monolith,
Especially one that’s in the rhinesmith.

The Mentor shudders at the sarcastic goat
He want to leave but she wants his coat.

See ver 2.0 on my blog https://csuitementor.blogspot.com/

Friedrich Nietzsche On The Secret Ingredient For Happiness


The idea that happiness-maximization is the criterion one should use in deciding what to do and how to act has probably been the most popular ethical view throughout history.

In opposition, Nietzsche insists that happiness should not be your goal.

For example, in his magnum opus — Thus Spoke Zarathustra — his protagonist declares:

“Do I strive after happiness? [No,] I strive after my works!”
And in Twilight of the Idols, he explicitly states that:

“Man [should] not strive after happiness.”
At this point, any philosopher worth his salt asks: “But what exactly does Nietzsche mean when he says these things?”

via Friedrich Nietzsche On The Secret Ingredient For Happiness

Interesting Quote, Pseudo-variants and Provoking Phrases of the day


Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Be who you are and say what you feel,

because those who mind don’t matter,

and those who matter don’t mind.”

— Bernard M. Baruch

Recently I read a variant / pseudo version of the above phrase and I was thinking – LOL ! 🙂

  • Poke Fun At
    Meaning: 
    Making fun of something or someone; ridicule.

    When you lose your originality, you search the web.  When your borrowed phrases exhaust and your plagiarism is exposed, one chooses to get back at people by twisting, twirling, modifying, stretching, shortening Quotes to misuse, abuse and put to disuse in order to Poke Fun At people who reveal your Truth but hold back due to professional secrecy. 

  • Elephant in the Room
    Meaning: 
    Ignoring a large, obvious problem or failing to address an issue that stands out in a major way.

    People who skirt, deflect and avoid issues while taking stances which are aggressive, abrasive and false pretenses but when they are exposed, their falsehood is open they still do not have the courage to see the Elephant in the room and behave like blind, deaf, mute people showing off their ‘Handicap'(as in Golf) to save the Facepalm moments. 

  • Beating Around the Bush
  • Meaning: 
  • Someone who is beating around the bush is someone who avoids the main point.
  • This is Self-Explnatory.

The people I am talking about have three distinct qualities.

First, they are willing to disagree ferociously, but talk civilly, (writing blasphemously with full blown profanity when challenged) about nearly every meaningful subject: religion, abortion, immigration, the nature of consciousness.

Second, in an age in which popular feelings about the way things ought to be often override facts about the way things actually are, each is determined to resist parroting what’s politically convenient using memory of convenience, logic of convenience and in the end wanting to make you see their TRUTH as your truth. Some of them are Pseudo-intellectuals and at last count someone said there are 150 of them in Delhi alone who are peddling some media house plan asking for Rs.5 Crores and finally willing to settle for as little as Rs. 5000 !

And third, some have paid for this commitment by being purged from institutions that have become increasingly hostile to unorthodox thought — and have found receptive audiences elsewhere – which includes Commies, pseudo-Marxists, pseudo Nihilists, Maoists and Wayfarers who wish to overthrow the government by hook or crook – they are seditionists who indoctrinate people into being brainwashed under the influence of Drugs and fake Love.

Via BrainPickings Newsletter: Theodore Roosevelt on the Cowardice of Cynicism and the Courage to Create Rather Than Criticize


I like this newsletter.  How many of us have met people who take refuge, subterfuge (deceit) of projecting they know everything as Omniscients and Demi-Gods! And their masks of Omnipotence wear out thin as the exposure hurts like Exfoliation of the soft skin exposed to the Tropical Sun. It burns like hell.

“There is nothing quite so tragic as a young cynic,” Maya Angelou wrote in contemplating courage in the face of evil, “because it means the person has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing.”

How to prevent that cultural tragedy, which poisons the heart of a just and democratic society, is what Theodore Roosevelt (October 27, 1858–January 6, 1919) examined when he took the podium at the Sorbonne in Paris on April 23 of 1910 to deliver one of the most powerful, rousing, and timelessly insightful speeches ever given, originally titled “Citizenship in a Republic” and later included under the title “Duties of the Citizen” in the 1920 volume Roosevelt’s Writings (public library).

Theodore Roosevelt

A century before Caitlin Moran cautioned that “cynicism scours through a culture like bleach, wiping out millions of small, seedling ideas,” Roosevelt admonishes against “that queer and cheap temptation” to be cynical, and writes:

The poorest way to face life is to face it with a sneer. There are many men who feel a kind of twister pride in cynicism; there are many who confine themselves to criticism of the way others do what they themselves dare not even attempt. There is no more unhealthy being, no man less worthy of respect, than he who either really holds, or feigns to hold, an attitude of sneering disbelief toward all that is great and lofty, whether in achievement or in that noble effort which, even if it fails, comes to second achievement. A cynical habit of thought and speech, a readiness to criticise work which the critic himself never tries to perform, an intellectual aloofness which will not accept contact with life’s realities — all these are marks, not as the possessor would fain to think, of superiority but of weakness. They mark the men unfit to bear their part painfully in the stern strife of living, who seek, in the affection of contempt for the achievements of others, to hide from others and from themselves in their own weakness. The rôle is easy; there is none easier, save only the rôle of the man who sneers alike at both criticism and performance.

One of the tendencies I find most troubling in contemporary culture is that of mistaking cynicism for critical thinking. This confusion seeds a pernicious strain of unconstructive and lazily destructive opprobrium. Amid this epidemic of self-appointed critics, it becomes harder and harder to remember just how right Bertrand Russell was when he asserted nearly a century ago that “construction and destruction alike satisfy the will to power, but construction is more difficult as a rule, and therefore gives more satisfaction to the person who can achieve it.”

With an eye to those lazy critics — the dead weight of society — Roosevelt offers:

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat… The man who does nothing cuts the same sordid figure in the pages of history, whether he be a cynic, or fop, or voluptuary. There is little use for the being whose tepid soul knows nothing of great and generous emotion, of the high pride, the stern belief, the lofty enthusiasm, of the men who quell the storm and ride the thunder.

The entire twenty-seven-page speech, found in Roosevelt’s Writings and on par with JFK’s superb speech on the artist’s role in society, is a masterpiece of thought and feeling, replete with insight into what it means to be a good citizen, a good leader, and a complete human being. Complement this particular fragment with Leonard Bernstein on the countercultural courage of resisting cynicism, Goethe on the only criticism worth voicing, and philosopher Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, then revisit Eleanor Roosevelt on how uncynical personal conviction powers social change.

I’m Right – You’re so Wrong – Nihilist Perspective today


William Shakespeare eloquently summarized the existential nihilist’s perspective when, in this famous passage near the end of Macbeth, he has Macbeth pour out his disgust for life:

Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more; it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,

Signifying nothing.

In real life, I have dealt with some pseudo-Nihilists and my experience is :

  1. Conscience is Conscience as long as it is favorable to me.
  2. I am always Right and you are ALWAYS wrong.
  3. Because you are a Non-Nihilist – you must be apologetic while Saying Sorry or apology is not Nihilist’s Tone or Tenor.
  4. As long as you play by Nihilist made “Rules” and “Hierarchical” system that favors Nihilists – You can play.  The moment you begin talking about your rules – Nihilists Clam up – go into deep silence, wait for an opportunity to strike back and put up a Facade called “Quietude”.

“A nihilist is a manor a woman who judges of the world as it is that it ought not to be, and of the world as it ought to be that it does not exist.” According to this view, our existence (action, suffering, willing, feeling) has no meaning: the pathos of ‘in vain’ is the nihilists’ pathos — at the same time, as pathos, an inconsistency on the part of the nihilists.

Friedrich Nietzsche, KSA 12:9 [60], taken from The Will to Power, section 585, translated by Walter Kaufmann
The converse is true when it comes to Nihilists of the day are concerned – Action, suffering, willing and feeling is for them while the other person and his/ her perspective has no right to exist and has no meaning. They are so inconsistent and always out to prove One-Up man/woman ship over others.
The Pseudo-Nihilists I have encountered have one thing in common:
They believe that you are “Not the Sharpest Tool in the Shed””
Meaning: 
Someone who isn’t witty or sharp, but rather, they are ignorant, unintelligent, or senseless.
And when you admit, it boosts their Superior Egos.
I had one such Terrifying incident with one of the mentees – a pseudo! Close But No Cigar
Meaning: 
Coming close to a successful outcome only to fall short at the end.  And as was expected the blame was put on me as the Mentor while Mentee Nihilist showed no sense of remorse, was unapologetic and aggressive. 
Sadly enough, this assignment was shortlived.   To sum it up it can be said “It’s Not All It’s Cracked Up To Be””
Meaning: 
Failing to meet expectations; not being as good as people say.
I may say it is All Greek To Me
Meaning: When something is incomprehensible due to complexity; unintelligble.
And Nihilist would readily agree – It is Greek Origin 🙂

7 Thought Experiments that will make you question everything


The Veil of Ignorance

Justice is blind, should we be? (Mural of Lady Justice by Alex Proimos. (Wikimedia Commons))

This experiment was devised by John Rawls in 1971 to explore notions of justice in his book A Theory of Justice.

Suppose that you and a group of people had to decide on the principles that would establish a new society. However, none of you know anything about who you will be in that society. Elements such as your race, income level, sex, gender, religion, and personal preferences are all unknown to you. After you decide on those principles, you will then be turned out into the society you established.

Question: How would that society turn out? What does that mean for our society now?

Rawls argues that in this situation we can’t know what our self-interest is so we cannot pursue it. Without that guidepost, he suggests that we would all try to create a fair society with equal rights and economic security for the poor both out of moral considerations and as a means to secure the best possible worst-case scenario for us when we step outside that veil. Others disagree, arguing that we would seek only to maximize our freedom or assure perfect equality

This raises questions for the current state of our society, as it suggests we allow self-interest to get in the way of progressing towards a just society. Rawls’ ideas about the just society are fascinating and can be delved into here.

via Seven thought experiments to make you question everything | Big Think

Interesting Philosophies


Nihilism (/ˈnaɪ(h)ɪlɪzəm, ˈniː-/; from Latin nihil, meaning ‘nothing’) is the philosophical viewpoint that suggests the denial or lack of belief towards the reputedly meaningful aspects of life. Most commonly, nihilism is presented in the form of existential nihilism, which argues that life is without objective meaning, purpose, or intrinsic value.[1] Moral nihilists assert that there is no inherent morality, and that accepted moral values are abstractly contrived. Nihilism may also take epistemological, ontological, or metaphysical forms, meaning respectively that, in some aspect, knowledge is not possible, or reality does not actually exist.

The term is sometimes used in association with anomie to explain the general mood of despair at a perceived pointlessness of existence that one may develop upon realising there are no necessary norms, rules, or laws.[2]

Nihilism has also been described as conspicuous in or constitutive of certain historical periods: for example, Jean Baudrillard and others have called postmodernity a nihilistic epoch;[3] and some religious theologians and figures of religious authority have asserted that postmodernity[4] and many aspects of modernity[5] represent a rejection of theism, and that such rejection of theistic doctrine entails nihilism.

via Nihilism – Wikipedia

At 12, I was already a Single Parent kid, having lost my father and a child labour trying to find ways to earn to find my personal identity and dignity of labour.

I found a mentor who taught me some of these 100, 200 years old Greeko Roman Philosophies which I learnt but forgot in the ensuing years of learning to survive, find status, make a family etc. etc.

As a Mentor, I did come across some pseudo Nihilists which I shall describe in coming posts. Pure Nihilists do not exist. They change with times.  The famous saying of Henry David Thoreau = “Things don’t change, We Change” , aptly describes a Nihilist.  Many of Nihilists I have met have self fulfilling Rules, Truths, morality which they make and change to suit themselves while denouncing those who try and impose upon them the socially established norms of behaviour such as sympathy, empathy, gratitude, conformity, obedience, non-diffidence but the pseudo Nihilist displays tendencies of Memory of convenience, Logic of Convenience to suit themselves and justifies it with Nihilism.

Such people deserve, deep peeling of their layers of masks painfully without even offering them plastic surgery as they need full and complete exposure in public for their misdeeds, misbehaviour, misdemeanour and hideous, hypocritic behaviour which can be detrimental to the people (including do-gooders) or the society in general.