Does Modi Government care? for Seniors or Diabetics? NO Way!


It is a government of the business, by the Business, for the business.  Modi Government its policies in the name of “Population . Dividend” . helping kill the Senior citizens.

Diabetes treatment in Depth

Putting patients on Insulin a Scam?

The prices of Insulin in India increased 25 to 30% in past 6 months.

Insulin therapy is often an important part of diabetes treatment. Understand the key role insulin plays in managing your blood sugar and preventing diabetes complications.

The role of insulin in the body

It may be easier to understand the importance of insulin therapy if you understand how this naturally occurring hormone usually works in the body and what happens if you have diabetes.

If you don’t have diabetes, insulin helps:

  • Regulate blood sugar levels. After you eat, carbohydrates break down into glucose, a sugar that is the body’s primary source of energy. Glucose then enters the bloodstream. The pancreas responds by producing insulin, which allows glucose to enter the body’s cells to provide energy.
  • Store excess glucose for energy. After you eat — when insulin levels are high — excess glucose is stored in the liver in the form of glycogen. Between meals — when insulin levels are low — the liver releases glycogen into the bloodstream in the form of glucose. This keeps blood sugar levels within a narrow range.

If you have diabetes:

Your glucose levels will continue to rise after you eat because there’s not enough insulin to move the glucose into your body’s cells. People with type 2 diabetes don’t use insulin efficiently (insulin resistance) and don’t produce enough insulin (insulin deficiency). People with type 1 diabetes make little or no insulin.

Untreated, high blood glucose can eventually lead to complications such as blindness, nerve damage and kidney damage.

Goals of insulin therapy

If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin therapy is vital for replacing the insulin your body doesn’t produce. Sometimes, people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes need insulin therapy if other treatments haven’t been able to keep blood glucose levels within the desired range. Insulin therapy helps prevent diabetes complications by keeping your blood sugar within your target range.

Types of insulin

There are several types of insulin available that vary in how quickly and how long they can control blood sugar. Frequently your doctor may recommend combining more than one type of insulin. To determine which types of insulin you need and how much you need, your doctor will consider factors such as the type of diabetes you have, your glucose levels, how much your blood sugar fluctuates throughout the day and your lifestyle.

The general types of insulin therapy include:

  • Long-, ultralong- or intermediate-acting insulin. When you’re not eating, your liver releases glucose so the body continually has energy. Long, ultra-long or intermediate-acting insulin helps the body use this glucose and keeps glucose levels from rising too high.
  • Examples of these insulins are glargine (Lantus, Basaglar, Toujeo), detemir (Levemir), degludec (Tresiba) and NPH (Humulin N, Novolin N, Novolin ReliOn Insulin N). These insulins work for between eight and 40 hours, depending on the type.
  • Rapid- or short-acting insulin. These insulins are ideal for preventing blood sugar spikes after you eat. They begin to work much faster than long-acting or intermediate-acting insulins do, sometimes in as little as three minutes. But they work for a much shorter period of time, usually about two to four hours.
  • Examples of these insulins include aspart (NovoLog, Fiasp), glulisine (Apidra), lispro (Humalog, Admelog) and regular (Humulin R, Novolin R).

Insulin delivery options

Insulin doesn’t come in pill form because the digestive system would break it down before it had a chance to work. But there are several choices for insulin delivery. Your doctor can help you decide which fits best with your lifestyle and treatment needs.

Options include:

  • Shots or pens. Insulin can be injected into the fat just below your skin with a syringe and needle or a penlike device that hold insulin with a needle attached. How often depends on the type of diabetes you have, your blood sugar levels and how often you eat. It may be multiple times each day.
  • Insulin pump. An insulin pump pushes small, steady doses of rapid-acting insulin into a thin tube inserted underneath your skin. These doses are delivered repeatedly throughout the day. There are several different kinds of insulin pumps available.
  • Inhaled insulin (Afrezza). This type of insulin is rapid-acting and you inhale it at the beginning of each meal. People who smoke or have lung problems such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease should not use inhaled insulin.

Insulin therapy can sometimes be demanding, but it’s an effective way to lower blood sugar levels. If you have any trouble with your insulin regimen, such as difficulty avoiding very low or very high blood sugar levels, be sure to talk to your doctor to see if any adjustments need to be made. By choosing an insulin regimen that fits your needs and lifestyle, you can prevent diabetes complications and lead an active, healthy life. via

Insulin therapy is often an important part of diabetes treatment. Understand the key role insulin plays in managing your blood sugar and preventing diabetes complications.

The role of insulin in the body

It may be easier to understand the importance of insulin therapy if you understand how this naturally occurring hormone usually works in the body and what happens if you have diabetes.

If you don’t have diabetes, insulin helps:

  • Regulate blood sugar levels. After you eat, carbohydrates break down into glucose, a sugar that is the body’s primary source of energy. Glucose then enters the bloodstream. The pancreas responds by producing insulin, which allows glucose to enter the body’s cells to provide energy.
  • Store excess glucose for energy. After you eat — when insulin levels are high — excess glucose is stored in the liver in the form of glycogen. Between meals — when insulin levels are low — the liver releases glycogen into the bloodstream in the form of glucose. This keeps blood sugar levels within a narrow range.

If you have diabetes:

Your glucose levels will continue to rise after you eat because there’s not enough insulin to move the glucose into your body’s cells. People with type 2 diabetes don’t use insulin efficiently (insulin resistance) and don’t produce enough insulin (insulin deficiency). People with type 1 diabetes make little or no insulin.

Untreated, high blood glucose can eventually lead to complications such as blindness, nerve damage and kidney damage.

Goals of insulin therapy

If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin therapy is vital for replacing the insulin your body doesn’t produce. Sometimes, people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes need insulin therapy if other treatments haven’t been able to keep blood glucose levels within the desired range. Insulin therapy helps prevent diabetes complications by keeping your blood sugar within your target range.

Types of insulin

There are several types of insulin available that vary in how quickly and how long they can control blood sugar. Frequently your doctor may recommend combining more than one type of insulin. To determine which types of insulin you need and how much you need, your doctor will consider factors such as the type of diabetes you have, your glucose levels, how much your blood sugar fluctuates throughout the day and your lifestyle.

The general types of insulin therapy include:

  • Long-, ultralong- or intermediate-acting insulin. When you’re not eating, your liver releases glucose so the body continually has energy. Long, ultra-long or intermediate-acting insulin helps the body use this glucose and keeps glucose levels from rising too high.
  • Examples of these insulins are glargine (Lantus, Basaglar, Toujeo), detemir (Levemir), degludec (Tresiba) and NPH (Humulin N, Novolin N, Novolin ReliOn Insulin N). These insulins work for between eight and 40 hours, depending on the type.
  • Rapid- or short-acting insulin. These insulins are ideal for preventing blood sugar spikes after you eat. They begin to work much faster than long-acting or intermediate-acting insulins do, sometimes in as little as three minutes. But they work for a much shorter period of time, usually about two to four hours.
  • Examples of these insulins include aspart (NovoLog, Fiasp), glulisine (Apidra), lispro (Humalog, Admelog) and regular (Humulin R, Novolin R).

Insulin delivery options

Insulin doesn’t come in pill form because the digestive system would break it down before it had a chance to work. But there are several choices for insulin delivery. Your doctor can help you decide which fits best with your lifestyle and treatment needs.

Options include:

  • Shots or pens. Insulin can be injected into the fat just below your skin with a syringe and needle or a penlike device that hold insulin with a needle attached. How often depends on the type of diabetes you have, your blood sugar levels and how often you eat. It may be multiple times each day.
  • Insulin pump. An insulin pump pushes small, steady doses of rapid-acting insulin into a thin tube inserted underneath your skin. These doses are delivered repeatedly throughout the day. There are several different kinds of insulin pumps available.
  • Inhaled insulin (Afrezza). This type of insulin is rapid-acting and you inhale it at the beginning of each meal. People who smoke or have lung problems such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease should not use inhaled insulin.

Insulin therapy can sometimes be demanding, but it’s an effective way to lower blood sugar levels. If you have any trouble with your insulin regimen, such as difficulty avoiding very low or very high blood sugar levels, be sure to talk to your doctor to see if any adjustments need to be made. By choosing an insulin regimen that fits your needs and lifestyle, you can prevent diabetes complications and lead an active, healthy life.

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Nice Quotes


Thomas A. Edison

“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.”

via Today’s Quote http://bit.ly/2Y5b1Tw June 24, 2019 at 10:41AM
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Noel Coward

“Work is much more fun than fun.”

via Today’s Quote https://ift.tt/2FssF9D June 26, 2019 at 10:41AM
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Rebecca West

“Life ought to be a struggle of desire toward adventures whose nobility will fertilize the soul.”

via Today’s Quote https://ift.tt/2h9t2g0 June 27, 2019 at 10:42AM
via RSS Feed https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/rebecca_west


Isaac Bashevis Singer

“Our knowledge is a little island in a great ocean of nonknowledge.”

via Today’s Quote https://ift.tt/2kjSB1T June 28, 2019 at 10:33AM
via RSS Feed https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/isaac_bashevis_singer


Ambrose Bierce

“Doubt is the father of invention.”

via Today’s Quote https://ift.tt/2CY5uCY June 29, 2019 at 10:32AM
via RSS Feed https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/ambrose_bierce


Euripides

“There is just one life for each of us: our own.”

via Today’s Quote https://ift.tt/2xwX6Lv June 30, 2019 at 10:41AM
via RSS Feed https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/euripides

Brainpickings.org Newsletter


This is the Brain Pickings midweek pick-me-up: Once a week, I plunge into my 12-year archive and choose something worth resurfacing and resavoring as timeless nourishment for heart, mind, and spirit. (If you don’t yet subscribe to the standard Sunday newsletter of new pieces published each week, you can sign up here – it’s free.) If you missed last week’s edition – Seneca on the shortness of life and the art of living wide rather than long – you can catch up right here. And if you find any value and joy in my labor of love, please consider supporting it with a donation – over these twelve years, I have spent tens of thousands of hours and tremendous resources on Brain Pickings, and every little bit of support helps keep it going. If you already donate: THANK YOU.

Wait: Galway Kinnell’s Beautiful and Life-Giving Poem for a Young Friend Contemplating Suicide

galwaykinnell_newselectedpoems.jpg?fit=320%2C480

“To decide whether life is worth living is to answer the fundamental question of philosophy,” Albert Camusfamously wrote — a statement that has only swelled in intellectual notoriety and spiritual significance in the half-century since. But beyond philosophy, when the will to live or die plays out in the personal realm, it creates a vortex of pain — not only for the anguished person contemplating suicide but for those who love them, to say nothing of the perilous social contagion of suicide.

Pulitzer-winning poet Galway Kinnell (February 1, 1927–October 28, 2014) addressed this elemental question of existence with extraordinary compassion and spiritual grace in a poem he wrote for a student of his who was contemplating suicide after the abrupt end of a romance. Originally published in Kinnell’s beautiful and beautifully titled 1980 collection Mortal Acts, Mortal Words, it was later included in A New Selected Poems (public library).

In this recording courtesy of the Academy of American Poets, Kinnell brings his miraculously life-giving words to life:

1d2b691d-af9c-4fed-912f-73f3864d7d27.png

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngWAIT

Wait, for now.
Distrust everything, if you have to.
But trust the hours. Haven’t they
carried you everywhere, up to now?
Personal events will become interesting again.
Hair will become interesting.
Pain will become interesting.
Buds that open out of season will become lovely again.
Second-hand gloves will become lovely again,
their memories are what give them
the need for other hands. And the desolation
of lovers is the same: that enormous emptiness
carved out of such tiny beings as we are
asks to be filled; the need
for the new love is faithfulness to the old.

Wait.
Don’t go too early.
You’re tired. But everyone’s tired.
But no one is tired enough.
Only wait a while and listen.
Music of hair,
Music of pain,
music of looms weaving all our loves again.
Be there to hear it, it will be the only time,
most of all to hear,
the flute of your whole existence,
rehearsed by the sorrows, play itself into total exhaustion.

I am grateful to Rosanne Cash and the New York Public Library’s Paul Holdengräber for bringing this enormously enlivening poem to my attention. Complement it with Diane Ackerman on what working at a suicide prevention hotline taught her about the human spirit.

For more beloved poets performing their work, hear Sylvia Plath reading “Spinster,”“The Birthday Present,” and “The Disquieting Muses,” Billy Collins reading “Aristotle,” T.S. Eliot reading “Burnt Norton,” Lucille Clifton reading “won’t you celebrate with me,” Elizabeth Alexander reading “Ars Poetica #100: I Believe,” Sarah Kay reading “The Paradox,” and Mary Oliver reading “Wild Geese.”

FORWARD TO A FRIEND/READ/LISTEN ONLINE/Like https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/05/16/wait-galway-kinnell/ on Facebook

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RELATED READING:

Having It Out with Melancholy: Amanda Palmer Reads Jane Kenyon’s Stunning Poem About Life With and After Depression

The Joy of Suffering Overcome: Young Beethoven’s Stirring Letter to His Brothers About the Loneliness of Living with Deafness and How Music Saved His Life

Tim Ferriss on How He Survived Suicidal Depression and His Tools for Warding Off the Darkness