Check out our free, digital Food Magazine: The Avocado Edition


https://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/food-drink/check-out-our-free-digital-food-magazine-the-avocado-edition-0d717132-0d8f-4620-9cfd-f30ac6c65096

Food Magazine: The Avocado Edition

Quick and Easy Vegetable Soup Recipe | Allrecipes


Quick and Easy Vegetable Soup

Rating: 4.65 stars

A low calorie, but filling, tomato-based vegetable soup. I use fresh vegetables when in season, frozen or canned in winter.By Anne VackrinosSavePinPrintShare

Gallery

Quick and Easy Vegetable Soup Anne VackrinosWatch

Recipe Summary

Servings:6Yield:6 servingsNutrition Info

Ingredients

Decrease Serving6Increase ServingAdjustOriginal recipe yields 6 servingsIngredient Checklist

  • 1 (14 ounce) can chicken broth
  • 1 (11.5 ounce) can tomato-vegetable juice cocktail
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 large potato, diced
  • 2 carrot, (7-1/2″)s carrots, sliced
  • 2 stalks celery, diced
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes
  • 1 cup chopped fresh green beans
  • 1 cup fresh corn kernels
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • Creole seasoning to taste

Add All Ingredients To Shopping List 

Oops! We cannot find any ingredients on sale near you. Do we have the correct zip code? UPDATEor use the browser toFind Me

Directions

Instructions Checklist

  • Step 1In a large stock pot, combine broth, tomato juice, water, potatoes, carrots, celery, undrained chopped tomatoes, green beans, and corn. Season with salt, pepper and Creole seasoning. Bring to a boil and simmer for 30 minutes or until all vegetables are tender.

 I Made It  Print

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving:116.2 calories; protein 4g 8% DV; carbohydrates 24.3g 8% DV; fat 0.6g 1% DV; cholesterol 1.6mg 1% DV; sodium 639.5mg 26% DV. Full Nutritionhttps://429edab549de35ae3803ce0a2fa71b44.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

COVID-19 via PNUTs Newsletter


COVID-19

Mixed Nuts via PNUTs Newsletter I like


MIXED NUTS: QUICK TAKES ON WORLD NEWS
Playing God With Mosquitoes 

(Joe Raedle via Getty Images)

  • In 2021, 750 million genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes are set to be released in the Florida Keys and a string of surrounding islands. The Environmental Protection Agency granted permission in May to the British-based but US-operated company, Oxitec, to produce the genetically engineered, male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, known as OX5034.
  • Aedes aegypti mosquitoes spread deadly diseases like dengue, Zika, chikungunya, and yellow fever to humans. Only female mosquitoes bite humans because they need blood to produce eggs. So the plan is to release the GM male mosquitoes who will then hopefully breed with wild female mosquitoes.
  • However, the male mosquitoes now carry a protein that will kill off any female offspring before they reach mature biting age. The males, which only feed on nectar, will survive and pass on the genes. Over time this will reduce the population of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in the area and thereby reduce the spread of disease to humans.
  • Green-lighting the pilot project, which has been debated for years, drew a swift outcry from environmental groups, who warned of unintended consequences. One group condemned the plan as a public “Jurassic Park experiment.” Activists warn of possible damage to ecosystems, and the potential creation of hybrid, insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. (BBC)

Gastro ObscuRA NEWSLETTER


Europe’s oldest tea, retro ice-cream cocktail recipes, and more.
Gastro Obscura

Strawberry Lime Smoothie Pops Recipe | Allrecipes


via Strawberry Lime Smoothie Pops Recipe | Allrecipes

Strawberry banana smoothie pops make an easy summertime frozen treat.

Ingredients

Decrease Serving

6

Increase Serving

Adjust

Original recipe yields 6 servings

Ingredient Checklist

  • 1 cup Almond Breeze Vanilla almondmilk
  • 1 cup frozen strawberries
  • ½ cup vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon honey or maple syrup
  • 1 medium banana
  • ½ lime, juiced
Add All Ingredients To Shopping List

Directions

Instructions Checklist

  • Step 1

    Blend all ingredients, then pour into ice pop molds.

  • Step 2

Dinner Ideas



Creamy Pumpkin Soup

Original recipe yields 4 servings

Ingredient Checklist

  • 2 ½ cups chicken broth
  • 1 (15 ounce) can pumpkin puree
  • ½ onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon Cajun seasoning
  • ½ cup heavy cream
Add All Ingredients To Shopping List 

Directions

Instructions Checklist

  • Step 1

    Heat chicken broth, pumpkin puree, onion, garlic, and Cajun seasoning to a boil in a saucepan over medium-high heat.

  • Step 2

    Reduce heat to low and simmer for 45 to 60 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes.

  • Step 3

    Stir in heavy cream before serving.

 I Made It  Print

Partner Tip

Reynolds® Aluminum foil can be used to keep food moist, cook it evenly, and make clean-up easier.

Nutrition Facts

156.5 calories; protein 2.7g 5% DV; carbohydrates 11.9g 4% DV; fat 11.7g 18% DV; cholesterol 43.9mg 15% DV; sodium 987.1mg 40% DV. Full Nutrition

Dinner Ideas



Garlic Basil Pizza

BASIL AND GARLIC WHITE PIZZA

Traditional pizza is always delicious, but there’s something about a cheese-filled white pizza that really hits the spot. Add on a slathering of garlic oil and plenty of basil and you’ll be in pizza heaven!

Overhead view of multiple slices of basil and garlic white pizza on a marble tray with recipe title at the bottom of the image

(This recipe for Basil and Garlic White Pizza was originally published in May 2012, but has been updated with new photos and content in 2018.)

File this under an actual conversation that really happened in real life:

Check-out boy at grocery store, ringing in my baby basil plant: Hey, I hear some people actually eat this stuff!

Me: Um, yes; it’s basil.

Check-Out Boy: Ew. It’s a plant.

Me: Yes, basil.

Check-Out Boy: If it grows in the ground, you won’t find me eating it!

Me: Like pretty much all vegetables? What about this pepper? (holding up a green bell pepper)

Check-Out Boy: That’s spicy, so it’s OK! But that (pointing at basil) is a plant and it has leaves. Why do I want to eat leaves?

Mediavine

Me: Because they taste good? And they’re healthy? Have you ever tried basil before?

Check-Out Boy: NO! I don’t eat plants!

At this point, I give up, collect my bags, and leave. LE SIGH.

And then I proceeded to go home and make a pizza with plants on it. Because I like plants. And also because I love white pizza and know it always tastes better with basil. And I figured I at least need one plant on this cheese-filled pizza. Grocery store boy doesn’t know what he’s missing out on.

WHAT IS WHITE PIZZA?

When we think of pizza, many of us think tomato sauce, mozzarella cheese, and maybe a topping like pepperoni, sausage, or basil. Of course, traditional pizza is delicious, but once you try white pizza, chances are you’ll be hooked!

White pizza is essentially pizza without tomato sauce and extra cheese instead, usually ricotta and mozzarella (sometimes they even involve alfredo sauce).

In my opinion, white pizzas often need a little something to add dimension to the cheese, which is why I use a garlic olive oil here plus lots of basil. The added parmesan cheese also adds a nice sharpness. I can pretty much promise you that you won’t be missing the tomato sauce at all!

WHAT KIND OF DOUGH IS BEST?

You can really use any pizza dough you want for this recipe, even store-bought. But I’m including the recipe for a whole wheat dough because I think it goes so perfectly with the pizza toppings.

I almost never make whole wheat dough for my pizza, but now that I’ve tried this half whole wheat dough, I feel like I’m going to be making it all the time. It is seriously so, so good!

I adapted the recipe from Jeff Hertzberg and Zoe Francois’s Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day (affiliate link), which is a must-have book for anyone interested in learning absolutely everything about pizza dough making (in case you don’t know Jeff and Zoe are Gods in the bread-making world).

You only need about 1/3 of this recipe for one pizza, but you can always put the leftover in the fridge for a few days (until you start craving another one of these!) or you can even freeze it for up to 3 months.

HOW TO MAKE BASIL AND GARLIC WHITE PIZZA

This white pizza is a pretty simple one, but one that is going to be on your mind for days after it’s long gone… It basically involves garlic, cheese, and basil. Hello, heaven.

Mediavine

To start, pre-heat oven to 450 degrees. Cover a 12-inch round pan with foil and lightly brush with 1 Tbsp olive oil. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough into a 12-inch round and place  on prepared pan.

Mix together minced garlic and 2 1/2 T extra-virgin olive oil in a small bowl. Using a pastry brush, brush dough with garlic olive oil mixture.

Layer slices of mozzarella on top of dough and spoon crumbles of ricotta cheese around. Cover pizza with 12 basil leaves and parmesan cheese shavings.

If you want to add additional toppings here, you certainly can. Anything works, but sausage or roasted chicken breast is especially delicious on white pizza! Also, if you’re feeling a little crazy, go for clams (white clam pizza is seriously to die for!)

Bake for about 18-22 minutes, until crust is browning and crispy.

Collage showing process for making pizza, including dough rolled out with garlic; mozzarella, ricotta, parmesan, and basil on dough; and pizza baked and just out of the oven

Call me crazy, but I love the little little burn marks on top of the cheese. Burnt cheese= best ever! I also love the combination of mozzarella, ricotta, and parmesan cheese. Give me all your cheese, people.

Mediavine

But also, give me all your garlic olive oil because I will drink that ish out of a water bottle. Isn’t “slathered in garlic” one of the best phrases ever? Garlic-slathered white pizza? Yes, please!

Overhead close-up of a slice of basil and garlic white pizza on a marble tray with other slices of pizza in the background

Don’t forget to chiffonade your leftover basil and sprinkle that around, as well. Basil baked at 450 degrees is nice and crispy and yummy, but fresh basil is even better. I feel like basil is one of those things you can enjoy year round and it will give you a little bit of summer happiness in the middle of winter.

Also, my grocery store sells basil plants almost all the time and how happy is it to have a basil plant in your kitchen in the middle of winter?

Landscape overhead view of multiple slices of basil and garlic white pizza on a marble tray
Mediavine

This partially whole wheat crust was honestly perfect. Delightfully chewy, but not overly so. Hearty without being heavy. And really, more satisfying than the typical all-purpose flour crust.

I’ve totally been back on my pizza-making game lately and I never want to stop. It feels like 2011 again. It’s super rare that I make tomato sauce-based pizzas, but I also haven’t made a white pizza in forever.

Overhead view of multiple slices of basil and garlic white pizza on a marble tray
Mediavine

Oh, grocery store checkout boy, how I wish I could have brought you a slice. Maybe then you could have seen how glorious plants are. And not just those “spicy” peppers that are actually bell peppers. Oh man, I fear that the youth of today is in serious trouble.

Do you love white pizza or are you more of a tomato sauce traditionalist? 

If you like this non-traditional pizza, check out my French Onion Soup Pizza and my Shrimp Scampi Pizza. Oh and for my fellow white pizza lovers, you have to try my Bacon White Pizza Dip! Oh, and I love the idea of burrata pizza like this one from Spices in my DNA.

Basil and Garlic White Pizza -- Traditional pizza is always delicious, but there's something about a cheese-filled white pizza that really hits the spot. Add on a slathering of garlic oil and plenty of basil and you'll be in pizza heaven | wearenotmartha.com

 Print Recipe

5 from 2 votes

Basil and Garlic White Pizza

Traditional pizza is always delicious, but there’s something about a cheese-filled white pizza that really hits the spot. Add on a slathering of garlic oil and plenty of basil and you’ll be in pizza heaven!
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Entree
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Healthier Pizza Dough, Unique Pizzas, White Pizza
Servings: 1 pizza
Author: Sues
Mediavine

Ingredients

  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 1/2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • Whole wheat pizza dough (1/3 of recipe below or you can use store-bought)
  • 8 oz. mozzarella cheese, cut into slices
  • 1/2 cup part-skim ricotta cheese
  • 15 basil leaves, divided
  • 1 oz. shaved parmesan cheese

Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

  • 1/2 Tbsp active dry yeast
  • 1 3/4 cup lukewarm water
  • 1/2 Tbsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp honey (can substitute with sugar)
  • 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
Get IngredientsPowered by Chicory

Instructions

  • Pre-heat oven to 450 degrees. Cover a 12-inch round pan with foil and lightly brush with 1 Tbsp olive oil.
  • Mix together minced garlic and 2 1/2 T extra-virgin olive oil in a small bowl.
  • On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough into a 12-inch round and place  on prepared pan.
  • Using a pastry brush, brush dough with garlic olive oil mixture. Layer slices of mozzarella on top of dough and spoon crumbles of ricotta cheese around.
  • Cover pizza with 12 basil leaves and parmesan cheese shavings.
  • Bake for about 18-22 minutes, until crust is browning and crispy. Chiffonade remaining 3 basil leaves and sprinkle over the top.

Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

  • In a large bowl, combine yeast and water. Let sit for 3 minutes. Stir in salt, honey or sugar, and olive oil.
  • Using a wooden spoon, stir in whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour until just blended. If dough is still wet, add in a bit more flour, 1 Tbsp at a time.
  • Cover the bowl with a towel and set aside at room temperature for about two hours, so it can rise. Once risen, either use dough or refrigerate if not using right away.

Notes

  • Pizza dough recipe adapted from Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in 5 Minutes a Day.
  • Leftover dough can be wrapped tightly in plastic wrap and stored in fridge for 5 days.
  • You can also freeze it for up to three months. Just make sure to divide it into individual portions before freezing.
  • Feel free to add more toppings to this pizza before baking, including pepperoni, sausage, roasted chicken breast, etc.

Breakfast Ideas



French Apple Cinnamon Tart

rustic french apple tart

Tested & Perfected Recipes

When we think of French desserts, we usually imagine fancy pâtisseries with pyramids of pastel-colored macarons and glossy fruit tarts. But when the French bake at home, they keep it simple. One of my favorite food writers, Dorie Greenspan, wrote of her time living in France: “No matter how chic the hostess, her homemade dessert invariably looked as rustic as if it had come from a farmhouse grand-mère.”

The recipes are often centuries old and passed down through the generations. In fact, the recipes are so tried and true, she writes, “many French women make them without recipes, or au pif.” This free-form French apple tart is something the French might throw together au pif, or by feel. Like an apple pie without the pan, it consists of a thin layer of cinnamon-scented apples atop a buttery, flaky crust.

Volume 0%

This ad will end in 4

I know the mere mention of a homemade pastry crust and rolling pin is enough to send some people running for the hills but, rest assured, this tart relies on a dough that’s virtually foolproof and easy to roll to out — and it comes together in a food processor in under a minute. And the beauty of a free-form tart is that you don’t have to fuss over crimping the dough into a pie plate: you simply fold it casually over the fruit. The charm of this dessert lies in its imperfections.

WHAT YOU’LL NEED TO MAKE A FRENCH APPLE TART

Before we get to the recipe, a word of advice: you might be tempted to load up the tart with extra apples but, trust me, less is more with this type of dessert. The apples release quite a bit of juice, which can leak from the tart and make a mess of the crust and your oven.

Also, be sure to use apples suitable for baking — think Fuji, Granny Smith, Jonagolds, Jonathans, Golden Delicious, Gala, Honey Crisp, etc. — otherwise, they’ll turn into applesauce.

HOW TO MAKE A FRENCH APPLE TART

how to make rustic apple tart

Begin by making the pastry: In a food processor fitted with the steel blade, combine the flour, salt and sugar. Pulse briefly to combine, then add the pieces of cold butter.

how to make rustic apple tart

Process just until the butter is the size of peas, about 5 seconds.

how to make rustic apple tart

Sprinkle the ice water over the mixture and process just until moistened and very crumbly, about 5 seconds.

how to make rustic apple tart

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface.

how to make rustic apple tart

Knead a few times, just until it comes together into a cohesive ball.

how to make rustic apple tart

Pat the dough into a disk.

how to make rustic apple tart

Flour your work surface again and dust the dough with flour, as well. Using a rolling pin, roll into a circle 8 to 10 inches in diameter, turning and adding more flour as necessary so the dough doesn’t stick. Transfer the dough to a parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate while you prepare the filling (you’ll roll the dough out further on the parchment paper so go ahead and clean your work surface).

how to make rustic apple tart

To make the filling: Peel, core, and cut the apples into 1/8-inch-thick slices (you should have about 4 cups) and place in a large bowl. Add the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, melted butter, and salt.

how to make rustic apple tart

Toss to combine.

how to make rustic apple tart

Take the dough from the fridge and slide the parchment paper onto the countertop. Roll the dough, directly on the parchment paper, into a 14-inch circle about 1/8 inch thick. It’s fine if the edges are a little ragged.

how to make rustic apple tart

Place the parchment and dough back on the baking sheet – the pastry should curve up the lip of the pan.

how to make rustic apple tart

Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of flour evenly over the pastry.

how to make rustic apple tart

Arrange the apple slices on top in overlapping concentric circles to within 3 inches of the edge. Don’t worry about making it look perfect! It doesn’t make much difference in the end and you don’t want the dough to get too warm.

how to make rustic apple tart

Fold the edges of the dough over the apples in a free-form fashion, working your way around and creating pleats as you go. Patch up any tears by pinching a bit of dough from the edge.

how to make rustic apple tart

Using a pastry brush, brush the pleated dough evenly with the beaten egg.

how to make rustic apple tart

Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the turbinado sugar over the top crust and 1 tablespoon over the fruit. Then chill the assembled tart in the fridge for 15 to 20 minutes while you preheat the oven.

how to make rustic apple tart

Bake for 55 to 65 minutes, or until the apples are tender and the crust is golden and cooked through. Transfer the pan to a rack and let cool. While the tart cools, make the optional glaze: mix the apricot jam with 1-1/2 teaspoons water in a small bowl. Heat in the microwave until bubbling, about 20 seconds. Then, using a pastry brush, brush the apples with the apricot syrup.

Use two large spatulas to transfer the tart to a serving plate or cutting board. Slice and serve warm or at room temperature. The tart is best served on the day it is made, but leftovers will keep, loosely covered on the countertop, for a few days.

rustic french apple tart

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Rustic French Apple Tart

Like an apple pie without the pan, this French apple tart consists of a thin layer of cinnamon-scented apples atop a buttery, flaky crust.

Servings: 8
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 1 Hour
Total Time: 1 Hour 30 Minutes, plus 20 minutes to chill

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE CRUST

  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, spooned and leveled
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1-1/2 sticks (12 tablespoons) very cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup very cold water

FOR THE FILLING

  • 1-3/4 lbs baking apples (3 large)
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

FOR ASSEMBLING & BAKING

  • 1 tablespoon all purpose flour
  • egg, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar
  • 1 tablespoon apricot jelly or jam, optional for glaze

INSTRUCTIONS

    1. Make the crust: Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a food processor fitted with the steel blade, combine the flour, salt and sugar. Pulse briefly to combine. Add the cold butter and process just until the butter is the size of peas, about 5 seconds. Sprinkle the ice water over the mixture and process just until moistened and very crumbly, about 5 seconds. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and knead a few times, just until it comes together into a cohesive ball. Pat the dough into a disk. Flour your work surface again and dust the dough with flour, as well. Using a rolling pin, roll into a circle 8 to 10 inches in diameter, turning and adding more flour as necessary so the dough doesn’t stick. Transfer the dough to the parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate while you prepare the filling (you’ll roll the dough out further on the parchment paper so go ahead and clean your work surface).
    2. Make the Filling: Peel, core, and cut the apples into 1/8-inch-thick slices (you should have about 4 cups) and place in a large bowl. Add the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, melted butter, and salt; toss to combine.
    3. Take the dough from the fridge and slide the parchment paper onto the countertop. Roll the dough, directly on the parchment paper, into a 14-inch circle about 1/8 inch thick. It’s fine if the edges are a little ragged. Place the parchment and dough back on the baking sheet – the pastry should curve up the lip of the pan.
    4. Assemble the tart: Sprinkle the flour evenly over the pastry. Arrange the apple slices on top in overlapping concentric circles to within 3 inches of the edge. Don’t worry about making it look perfect! It doesn’t make much difference in the end and you don’t want the dough to get too warm. Fold the edges of the dough over the apples in a free-form fashion, working your way around and creating pleats as you go. Patch up any tears by pinching a bit of dough from the edge.
    5. Using a pastry brush, brush the pleated dough evenly with the beaten egg. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the turbinado sugar over the top crust and 1 tablespoon over the fruit. Chill the assembled tart in the fridge for 15 to 20 minutes.
    6. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°F and set an oven rack in the center position.
    7. Bake for 55 to 65 minutes, or until the apples are tender and the crust is golden and cooked through. (It’s okay if some of the juices leak from the tart onto the pan. The juices will burn on the pan but the tart should be fine — just scrape any burnt bits away from the tart once it’s baked.) Transfer the pan to a rack and let cool.
    8. While the tart cools, make the optional glaze. In a small bowl, mix the apricot jam with 1-1/2 teaspoons water. Heat in the microwave until bubbling, about 20 seconds. Using a pastry brush, brush the apples with the apricot syrup.
    9. Use two large spatulas to transfer the tart to a serving plate or cutting board. Slice and serve warm or at room temperature. The tart is best served on the day it is made, but leftovers will keep, loosely covered on the countertop, for a few days.
    10. Make Ahead: The dough can be made up to 3 days in advance and refrigerated. Allow it to sit at room temperature for about 15 minutes or until pliable before rolling.
  1. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: The assembled tart may be frozen for up to 3 months. To freeze, place the baking sheet in the freezer until the tart is frozen, then wrap tightly. (Wait until right before baking the tart to brush the beaten egg and sprinkle the sugar onto the crust.) Bake directly from the freezer. (It may take a few extra minutes to bake from frozen.)

NUTRITION INFORMATION

Powered by Edamam

Improve Your Culinary Skills With These Cooking Terms | Word Genius


via Improve Your Culinary Skills With These Cooking Terms | Word Genius

Words for Cutting Techniques

Dice

To dice food is to finely chop it into small cubes. Onions and other vegetables are often diced for even cooking. “Dice” is also the plural for “die,” the small cube with numbered sides featured in countless board games. The gaming term came around in the early 14th century, and the culinary cousin popped up that same century.

Mince

Mincing is also the act of chopping food into small pieces, although without the emphasis on the cube shape. This one came from the Latin minutiæ, meaning small bits. The increment of time, 1/60 of an hour, also comes from this tiny Latin word.

Words for Cooking Techniques

Sauté

Chefs who let their food sizzle in a pan before tossing it into the air are well versed in the art of sautéing. It is the jumping that defines this method, as the direct translation of the French word sauté into English is “jump up.” This method and term has been used in cooking since the 1820s.

Roast

Simply enough, to roast is to cook in a dry heat. This word came from the old French rostir, which meant to roast or burn, and has been in use since the early 13th century.

Bake

Ancient Egyptian bakeries have been discovered by archaeologists, so this is probably the oldest method on the list. Technically similar to roasting, the old English bacan meant to cook by dry heat in a closed place or on a heated surface. Note: Bacan became bake, but not bacon (which comes from German for “back”).

Words for Flavoring Food

Glaze

A glaze is a shiny (and usually sweet) coating added to meat, vegetables, or desserts. The noun came from the verb — to glaze. The first people to glaze something were 14th-century glass workers, who used the middle English word glasen, which meant to fit with glass or to make shine. When glazing ham, we are talking about using honey and not glass.

Season

The noun “season” (winter, spring, etc.) is quite different from the cooking verb “season” (to improve flavor by adding spices); however, the two have entangled histories. The verb is from the 1300s old French assaisoner, which meant to ripen or season. However, the modern English is a combination of that word, and the concept of fruit becoming tastier as it ripens, like time passing through seasons.