DhananjayParkhe

WORD OF THE DAY

WORD OF THE DAY
Baroque
bə-ROHK
Part of speech: adjective
Origin: French, mid-18th century
1

Relating to or denoting a style of European architecture, music, and art of the 17th and 18th centuries that followed mannerism and is characterized by ornate detail.

2

Highly ornate and extravagant in style.

Examples of Baroque in a sentence

“‘Prose is architecture, not interior decoration, and the Baroque is over.’ — Ernest Hemingway”

“The historical home was maintained in the height of its baroque style. “

DhananjayParkhe

WORD OF THE DAY

WORD OF THE DAY
Oscillate
AH-sə-leit
Part of speech: verb
Origin: Latin, early 18th century
1

Move or swing back and forth at a regular speed.

2

(Physics) Vary in magnitude or position in a regular manner around a central point.

Examples of Oscillate in a sentence

“‘The pendulum of the mind oscillates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong.’ — Carl Gustav Jung”

“The light made the electrons in each atom oscillate back and forth from one side of the atom to the other.”

DhananjayParkhe

14. International Day of Friendship – 30th July

International Day of Friendship

This day is celebrated to honor those friends in your life that have made all the difference.

Content marketing ideas:    

  • Listicle idea: X Places to visit with friends once the lockdown is lifted
  • Infographic idea: Foods that are perfect for snacking with your friend
  • Video idea: X Best movies about friendships you should watch
  • Podcast idea: How honest should you be with your friends?

Brand campaign that worked:

This video from UNICEF shows them partnering with BTS to show the power of kindness and friendship to heal people.

15. World Day against Trafficking in Persons – 30th July

World Day Against Trafficking in Persons

This day is celebrated to raise awareness of the situation of victims of human trafficking and for the promotion and protection of their rights.

Content marketing ideas:

  • Listicle idea: X Industries where human trafficking is rampant
  • Infographic idea:  How can you spot and stop human trafficking?
  • Video idea: Stories of survivors of sex trafficking you must hear
  • Podcast idea: Why are children particularly vulnerable to human trafficking?

Brand campaign that worked:

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) observed the World Day Against Trafficking in Persons by organizing a wide range of events around the globe to highlight this heinous crime.

DhananjayParkhe

Interesting Days to Remember in July2020

As the pandemic continues to restrict our plans, global days and celebrations offer positive, near future events to focus on. Below are the key global days this July, accompanied by selected educational resources. Click the title of each day for detailed explanations and further resources.
4th July – International Day of Cooperatives 
This year’s theme is ‘cooperatives for climate action’.

  • Explore climate protection projects run by cooperatives around the world using this interactive map.
  • Read these 12 examples of how cooperatives in different sectors, across the globe, can support SDG12 by boosting sustainable consumption and production.

5th July – Asalha Puja / Dharma Day
A Buddhist celebration where people show gratitude to Buddha and other enlightened teachers for sharing their understanding.

  • Explore this illustrated overview of Buddhism and quiz from BBC Bitesize (for KS2).
  • Watch this video on life as a Buddhist by BBC Bitesize (for year 10 and 11).

11th July – World population Day

  • Use the ‘worldmapper’ website to illustrate global population differences to students in a clear, visual way. This tool shows a range of maps where countries sizes reflect specific population details, including coronavirus cases among other things.
  • Explore the impacts of the rapidly increasing human population, combined with growing rates of consumption, on health, well-being, and the environment with these 3 lesson plans from the British Council in partnership with The Royal Society (for KS2 and 3).

18th July – Nelson Mandela Day
With the current wave of global anti-racism protests highlighting the vital need for solidarity and action to end poverty and injustice, this day is a particularly important event.

30th July – World Day Against Trafficking in Persons 

  • Learn about slavery, past and present, through these 7 excellent lesson plans on ‘Ending Slavery: An unfinished business’ from the Citizenship Foundation.
  • Encourage empathy through these stories from children who have been victim to trafficking, provided by the UN.

Also on the 30th July – International Friendship Day 
This day aims to bridge the gaps between factors such as race, language and culture.

DhananjayParkhe

Wisdom Quotes

Wisdom is the sum of all you learned in school and haven’t forgotten to this day.

Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school. (Albert Einstein)

All roads lead you to your destination if you don’t know where you’re going.
If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there. (Lewis Carroll)

DhananjayParkhe

13. International Tiger Day – 29th July

International Tiger Day

This day is commemorated to raise awareness for tiger conservation.

Content marketing ideas:    

  • Listicle idea:  Here’s how you can differentiate between wildcats
  • Infographic idea: What are the different species of tigers?
  • Video idea: X Famous fictional tigers on screen
  • Podcast idea:  What to do if you want to spot a tiger on your safari

Brand campaign that worked:

This video by National Geographic lists five surprising facts about tigers you might not know.

DhananjayParkhe

Wisdom Quotes

Put your everything in even the smallest step and you’ll be on the path to success.

Put your heart, mind, and soul into even your smallest acts. This is the secret of success. (Swami Sivananda)

The intelligent know to belief only half of what they hear. The wise know which half.
An intelligent man believes only half of what he hears, a wise man knows which half. (Even Esar)

DhananjayParkhe

12. World Hepatitis Day – 28th July

World Hepatitis Day Content Marketing Ideas

This day is celebrated to encourage governments to step up their response to the ever-present threat of hepatitis.

Content marketing ideas:    

  • Listicle idea: How can you differentiate between different types of hepatitis?
  • Infographic idea:X  Foods you must avoid if you suffer from hepatitis
  • Video idea: Here’s how hepatitis affects your liver
  • Podcast idea: How can you boost your liver function?

Brand campaign that worked:

The WHO tells people how hepatitis can be prevented through this simple, animated video.

Daily Blog, Dhananjaya Parkhe, DhananjayParkhe, Seth Godin Newsletter

Deliberately lo-fi

Deliberately lo-fi

The resolution of communication has been on a downward slide for more than a decade.

Careful hand-tuned typography shifts to endless Helvetica, poorly kerned.

Face to face goes to landline phone call goes to cell phone call, goes to yelling into a speakerphone goes to lazy Zoom etiquette.

Music goes from live to vinyl to mp3.

Much of this is driven by the need to squeeze more and more stuff into a narrow pipe combined with a cultural desire for more instead of better.

But…

It will flip.

It always does.

Because better is better.

DhananjayParkhe

Wisdom Quotes

Even if you’re on the right path, you’ll get nowhere if you stand still.

Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there. (Will Rogers)

Wisdom is not only defined by what you know, but also be knowing what you don’t.
To know what you know and what you do not know, that is true knowledge. (Confucius)

DhananjayParkhe

WORD OF THE DAY

WORD OF THE DAY
Forenoon
FOR-noon
Part of speech: noun
Origin: Old English, 15th century
1

The morning.

Examples of Forenoon in a sentence

“‘Some of my pleasantest hours were during the long rain-storms in the spring or fall, which confined me to the house for the afternoon as well as the forenoon, soothed by their ceaseless roar and pelting.’ — Henry David Thoreau”

“Come over in the forenoon, and we’ll have a cup of coffee and chat.”

DhananjayParkhe

WORD OF THE DAY

WORD OF THE DAY
Forenoon
FOR-noon
Part of speech: noun
Origin: Old English, 15th century
1

The morning.

Examples of Forenoon in a sentence

“‘Some of my pleasantest hours were during the long rain-storms in the spring or fall, which confined me to the house for the afternoon as well as the forenoon, soothed by their ceaseless roar and pelting.’ — Henry David Thoreau”

“Come over in the forenoon, and we’ll have a cup of coffee and chat.”

DhananjayParkhe

11. Kargil Vijay Diwas – 26th July

Kargil Vijay Diwas Content Marketing Ideas

This day commemorates the day Indian soldiers successfully conducted Operation Vijay.

Content marketing ideas:    

  • Listicle idea: Here’s how you can enlist in the army
  • Infographic idea: Who were the heroes of the Kargil war?
  • Video idea: How does India manage to keep its peace with her neighbors?
  • Podcast idea: What is the role of the army in times of peace?

Brand campaign that worked:

A leading brand in real estate did a social media post with the concept – The soldiers and martyrs make our homes safe and secure by putting themselves on the line of fire.

Brand Campaigns that worked for Kargil Vijay Diwas

DhananjayParkhe

11. Kargil Vijay Diwas – 26th July

Kargil Vijay Diwas Content Marketing Ideas

This day commemorates the day Indian soldiers successfully conducted Operation Vijay.

Content marketing ideas:    

  • Listicle idea: Here’s how you can enlist in the army
  • Infographic idea: Who were the heroes of the Kargil war?
  • Video idea: How does India manage to keep its peace with her neighbors?
  • Podcast idea: What is the role of the army in times of peace?

Brand campaign that worked:

A leading brand in real estate did a social media post with the concept – The soldiers and martyrs make our homes safe and secure by putting themselves on the line of fire.

Brand Campaigns that worked for Kargil Vijay Diwas

DhananjayParkhe

WORD OF THE DAY

WORD OF THE DAY
Epoch
EH-pək
Part of speech: noun
Origin: Latin, early 17th century
1

A period of time in history or a person’s life, typically one marked by notable events or particular characteristics.

2

The beginning of a distinctive period in the history of someone or something.

Examples of Epoch in a sentence

“‘Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people, citizens of distant epochs, who never knew one another.’ — Carl Sagan”

“A British epoch is defined by the ruling monarch: Elizabethan, Georgian, Victorian, and Edwardian.”

DhananjayParkhe

11 ways to stop procrastinating—for good – Big Think

via 11 ways to stop procrastinating—for good – Big Think

  • Most of us feel guilty or lazy when we put things off until a later date or time, but procrastination is normal and happens to everyone. The key is not to eliminate the word from your vocabulary, but to find ways to work and rest smarter so that tasks get done.
  • In this video, investor Tim Ferriss, behavioral economist Dan Ariely, health and wellness expert Jillian Michaels, and others share 11 tips for mastering procrastination including focusing on long-term happiness, understanding the differences between inspiration and motivation, trying the Pomodoro technique, and removing the things that are distracting you from the project at hand.
  • One interesting tip shared by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Charles Duhigg is to build procrastination into your workflow as a reward. “If you need five minutes every hour to look at tweets or to just surf the internet, you need to schedule that into your schedule.” According to Duhigg, it’s when we try to ignore that urge completely that things fall apart.
DhananjayParkhe

Doom scrolling – Seth Godin’s Newsletter

Doom scrolling

Being informed is a virtue. It helps us make better decisions and encourages us to take action.

Getting hooked on an endless scroll of media inputs is not the same as being informed. There’s long been a business model of urgent news (“man bites dog!”), but now it’s been leveraged, amplified and optimized to suck people in for hours at a time. And division is much easier to sell than progress.

If it’s not helping you take action to make things better, what’s it for?

DhananjayParkhe

Advertising concept & practice

The marketing thought and follow bore is geared toward college students without the above-mentioned capabilities of advertising and marketing. As such, it is designed to e-book contributors in the course of the simple ideas of advertising, and the way they reapplied in follow. In specific, it goals to supply college students with a theoretical and functional potential of simple advertising and marketing theories, ideas and analytical equipment. It additionally explores the critical tasks of advertising administration, and introduces students to key advertising equipment, such as the features of the marketing mix.

The bore makes use of case reviews to explore basic, analytic advertising tools and their software to the advertising and marketing decision-authoritative manner. apperception, exact acumen and presentation expertise can be enhanced as diverse viewpoints are proposed and dedicated, in discussions and presentations to other students in type.

DhananjayParkhe

Wisdom Quotes

It takes courage to speak up when needed, but it also takes courage to listen.

Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen. (Winston Churchill)

Desire is the seed from which all achievements are harvested.
The starting point of all achievement is desire. (Napoleon Hill)

DhananjayParkhe

Quotes of the week

Alexis de Tocqueville

“There are many men of principle in both parties in America, but there is no party of principle.”

via Today’s Quote https://ift.tt/301ewN7 July 13, 2020 at 10:57AM
via RSS Feed https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/alexis-de-tocqueville-quotes


James Baldwin

“People are trapped in history and history is trapped in them.”

via Today’s Quote https://ift.tt/37j8U3I July 14, 2020 at 10:57AM
via RSS Feed https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/james-baldwin-quotes


Lucius Annaeus Seneca


Saint Augustine

“Patience is the companion of wisdom.”

via Today’s Quote https://ift.tt/2QWiW4a July 17, 2020 at 10:57AM
via RSS Feed https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/saint-augustine-quotes


Orson Scott Card

“Metaphors have a way of holding the most truth in the least space.”

via Today’s Quote https://ift.tt/2MQzqJ8 July 18, 2020 at 10:57AM
via RSS Feed https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/orson-scott-card-quotes

DhananjayParkhe

Commercial vulnerability – Seth Godin

Commercial vulnerability

If you have a retail chain that offers:

A variety of products

at high margins

that are easy to ship

without being needed immediately

in expensive retail locations

where the in-person shopping experience isn’t particularly remarkable…

Then you’re in big trouble. Even before the pandemic. Because an online retailer is going to offer a better-priced, more convenient, higher-variety alternative and once your best customers try it, they won’t come back very often.

That seems pretty obvious, and we’re seeing the retail landscape littered with companies that should have seen this coming but didn’t do anything about it, because they were too busy protecting what they thought they were good at.

The question for most of us is: What if the work you do is:

compliance-based

standardized

repetitive

not based on innovative or flexible customer interaction…

If it is, it’s pretty likely that you’ll be replaced by a combination of robots, AI and outsourcing.

If they can find someone or something cheaper than you, they’re going to work overtime to do so.

The alternative is to be local, creative, energetic, optimistic, trusted, innovative and hard to replace.

DhananjayParkhe

10. World Chess Day – 20th July

World Chess Day Content Marketing Ideas

This day is celebrated to mark the date of establishment of the International Chess Federation (FIDE) in Paris in 1924.

Content marketing ideas:    

  • Listicle idea: Books on chess that you can read
  • Infographic idea: X Different styles of chess you should know
  • Video idea: The best finishing moves in chess
  • Podcast idea: How can playing chess help children to improve their attention span?

Brand campaign that worked:

This video by TED-Ed explains the history of the game of chess from its origin as a board game to the software-based versions we see today.

DhananjayParkhe

Seth Godin’s NEwsletter

Inventing narratives

That story in your head? It’s invented.

It has to be.

It might be based on some things that actually happened. The story we tell ourselves might be a useful predictor now and then. The story might even have been put there against our wishes, over time.

But it can’t possibly be a complete and detailed understanding of everything. That’s why it’s a narrative. It’s a shorthand, a map–not the territory. It’s filled with shortcuts and mindreading, a personal myth about you and your role in the world.

If we find our story isn’t helping us, if it’s inaccurate or distracting or enervating, we can work to change it.

DhananjayParkhe

Brainpickings.org Newsletter

This is the weekly email digest of the daily online journal Brain Pickings by Maria Popova. If you missed last week’s edition — a young poet’s love letter to our broken, beautiful world; Eleanor Roosevelt’s reading of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights set to music, Coleridge on the sublimity of storms — you can catch up right here. And if you find any value and joy in my labor of love, please consider supporting it with a donation – I spend innumerable hours and tremendous resources on it each week, as I have been for fourteen years, and every little bit of support helps enormously. If you already donate: THANK YOU.

Viktor Frankl on How Music, Nature, and Our Love for Each Other Succor Our Survival and Give Meaning to Our Lives

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Who can weigh the ballast of another’s woe, or another’s love? We live — with our woes and our loves, with our tremendous capacity for beauty and our tremendous capacity for suffering — counterbalancing the weight of existence with the irrepressible force of living. The question, always, is what feeds the force and hulls the ballast.

Viktor Frankl (March 26, 1905–September 2, 1997), having lost his mother, his father, and his brother to our civilization’s most colossal moral failure yet, having barely survived himself, Frankl takes up the question of what makes life not only survivable but worthy of living in what now lives as Yes to Life: In Spite of Everything (public library) — a slim, powerful set of lectures he delivered a mere eleven months after the Holocaust, just as he was completing the manuscript of the classic Man’s Search for Meaning.

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Art from Trees at Night by Art Young, 1926. (Available as a print.)

Tucked into Frankl’s immensely insightful meditations on moving beyond optimism and pessimism to find the deepest source of meaning is a passage of great subtlety and great splendor — a portal to a truth so elemental that it might appear trite if stated merely as an abstract truism, but one which rises titanic and majestic from the crucible of this human being’s unfathomable lived experience.

In a sublime sidewise testament to the singular power of music, which some of humanity’s vastest minds have so memorably extolled, Frankl writes:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngIt is not only through our actions that we can give life meaning — insofar as we can answer life’s specific questions responsibly — we can fulfill the demands of existence not only as active agents but also as loving human beings: in our loving dedication to the beautiful, the great, the good. Should I perhaps try to explain for you with some hackneyed phrase how and why experiencing beauty can make life meaningful? I prefer to confine myself to the following thought experiment: imagine that you are sitting in a concert hall and listening to your favorite symphony, and your favorite bars of the symphony resound in your ears, and you are so moved by the music that it sends shivers down your spine; and now imagine that it would be possible (something that is psychologically so impossible) for someone to ask you in this moment whether your life has meaning. I believe you would agree with me if I declared that in this case you would only be able to give one answer, and it would go something like: “It would have been worth it to have lived for this moment alone!”

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Viktor Frankl

More than a century after Mary Shelley celebrated nature as a lifeline to sanity in considering what makes life worth living in a world savaged by a deadly pandemic, and decades before Tennessee Williams reflected as he approached his own death that “we live in a perpetually burning building, and what we must save from it, all the time, is love… love for each other and the love that we pour into the art we feel compelled to share: being a parent; being a writer; being a painter; being a friend,” Frankl adds:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngThose who experience, not the arts, but nature, may have a similar response, and also those who experience another human being. Do we not know the feeling that overtakes us when we are in the presence of a particular person and, roughly translates as, The fact that this person exists in the world at all, this alone makes this world, and a life in it, meaningful.

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Art from Trees at Night by Art Young, 1926. (Available as a print.)

In how we suffer and how we love, Frankl concludes, is the measure of who and what we are:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngHow human beings deal with the limitation of their possibilities regarding how it affects their actions and their ability to love, how they behave under these restrictions — the way in which they accept their suffering under such restrictions — in all of this they still remain capable of fulfilling human values.

So, how we deal with difficulties truly shows who we are.

Yes to Life is a slender, spectacular read in its totality. Complement this fragment with Borges on turning trauma misfortune, and humiliation into raw material for art and Whitman, shortly after his paralytic stroke, on what makes life worth living, then revisit Frankl on humor as a lifeline to survival.

FORWARD TO A FRIEND/READ ONLINE/Like https://www.brainpickings.org/2020/07/17/viktor-frankl-yes-to-life-love-music/ on Facebook

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Two Friends: A Lovely Illustrated Celebration of Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony’s Entwined Paths as Pioneers of Freedom, Justice, and Equality

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“How can we use each other’s differences in our common battles for a livable future?” Audre Lorde asked while traveling in a divided world a generation after the landmark Universal Declaration of Human Rights declared that “recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” Another generation earlier — an interval imperceptible on the timescales of our evolutionary history — these rights were reserved for only one class of human family members: white men.

That a civilization was able to broaden the legal aperture of civic agency and human dignity so dramatically in so short a time was the triumph of two parallel and consanguine movements: women’s suffrage and abolition, propelled by a small, unrelenting tribe of pioneers in the middle of the nineteenth century. The most active and ardent of them were women — women like Susan B. Anthony and Julia Ward Howe, who spoke and wrote and rallied unrelentingly for human rights and civic agency; women like astronomer and abolitionist Maria Mitchell, who swung open the gates to women’s education in science and whose lovely lifelong friendship with Frederick Douglass was an honor to both; women who, in the aftermath of the Civil War, diverted their suffrage efforts from securing the vote for themselves to securing the vote for African Americans — parallel efforts for which Margaret Fuller had furnished the catalytic spark with her insistence that “while any one is base, none can be entirely free and noble.” (In a disquieting recompense for these women’s efforts, the right to vote was extended to black men half a century before it was extended to women of any ethnicity.)

In the city of Rochester in upstate New York there stands — or, rather, sits — a bronze sculpture depicting two of these courageous champions of freedom having tea: Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) and Susan B. Anthony (1820–1906), whose neighboring braveries blossomed into a real friendship after both moved to Rochester around the same time in their late twenties. It was in Rochester that Anthony voted in a presidential election, well aware she was going to be arrested for it; it was in Rochester that Douglass launched his epoch-making abolitionist newspaper (which he titled the North Star, in homage to the central role of astronomy in the Underground Railroad).

Inspired by the sculpture and the beautiful camaraderie behind it, Two Friends: Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass (public library) by Dean Robbins, illustrated by Selina Alko and Sean Qualls, tells the story of these two pioneering lives entwined in friendship through an imaginary evening of tea and cake.

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We see each of them transcend the givens of their condition: Susan, excluded from formal education on account of her gender, educates herself in the founding ideals of her country and is galled by the hypocrisy of proclaiming the rights to live free and to vote, but denying those rights to more than half; Frederick, enslaved, teaches himself to read and write, then learns about the same ideals and is galled by the same hypocrisy of exclusion.

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We see Frederick clad in his “gentleman’s jacket, vest, and tie,” and Susan in “a kind of pants called ‘bloomers,’” which she prefers over the cumbersome skirts that make it “hard to get things done.”

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Both of them teach themselves to give speeches on justice and equality, both of them deliver those speeches before audiences to the applause of some and the vocal dismay of others, until the two eventually meet in Rochester and promise “to help each other, so one day all people could have rights.”

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And so they do: We see them discuss their ideas and their plans over tea and cake and warm conspiratorial smiles.

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2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngSo many speeches to give.
So many articles to write.
So many minds to change.

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Couple Two Friends with a wondrous celebration of the rebels who won women political power, illustrated by the incomparable Maira Kalman, then savor other picture-book biographies of cultural heroes, pioneers, and visionaries: John LewisKeith HaringWangari MaathaiMaria MitchellAda LovelaceLouise BourgeoisE.E. CummingsJane GoodallJane JacobsFrida KahloLouis BraillePablo NerudaAlbert EinsteinMuddy Waters, and Nellie Bly.

FORWARD TO A FRIEND/READ ONLINE/Like https://www.brainpickings.org/2020/07/12/two-friends-susan-b-anthony-frederick-douglass/ on Facebook

Virginia Woolf on Why We Read and What Great Works of Art Have in Common

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Patti Smith listed among her criteria for a literary masterpiece that it must leave one so enchanted as to feel “immediately obliged to reread it.” Susan Sontag considered rereading an act of rebirth. I attest to this readily with my habit of rereading The Little Prince once a year every year, each time finding in it new revelations of meaning, new existential salve for whatever is ailing my life at that particular moment. We reread beloved books because on some level we recognize the temporality of all experience and the temporariness of the confluence of states and circumstances comprising the self at any given moment — we recognize that next year’s self will outgrow last year’s self and move on to a whole new set of challenges, hopes, and priorities, becoming, in some essential sense, a whole new self.

Virginia Woolf (January 25, 1882–March 28, 1941) was only twenty-one when she recorded this recognition with uncommon lucidity of mind and luminosity of language.

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Virginia Woolf

In the summer of 1903, Woolf took two months’ respite from London’s bustle in the blue-green spaciousness of the English countryside, enjoying “a very free out of door life” and reading voraciously. “I read more during these 8 weeks in the country than in six London months perhaps.” Under the twin luxuries of time for reading and space for reflection, she arrived at a revelatory new understanding of why it is we read at all — what books do for the human spirit, how they furnish what Iris Murdoch would call “an occasion for unselfing,” and how they can perform the astonishing acrobatics of arising from one consciousness and reaching another — thousands, millions of others, across time and space — on such an intimate level, and in the process interleaving those myriad different consciousnesses into a shared wilderness of experience.

On the first of July, she writes in her diary:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngI read a great deal… Besides this I write… But the books are the things that I enjoy — on the whole — most. I feel sometimes for hours together as though the physical stuff of my brain were expanding, larger & larger, throbbing quicker & quicker with new blood — & there is no more delicious sensation than this. I read some history: it is suddenly all alive, branching forwards & backwards & connected with every kind of thing that seemed entirely remote before. I seem to feel Napoleons influence on our quiet evening in the garden for instance — I think I see for a moment how our minds are all threaded together — how any live mind today is of the very same stuff as Plato’s & Euripides. It is only a continuation & development of the same thing. It is this common mind that binds the whole world together; & all the world is mind.

Velocity_LiaHalloran.jpg?resize=680%2C865

Art by Lia Halloran from A Velocity of Being: Letters to a Young Reader. Available as a print.

Later in life, Woolf would return to this realization in her exquisite account of the epiphany in which she understood what it means to be an artist, writing:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngBehind the cotton wool is hidden a pattern… the whole world is a work of art… there is no Shakespeare… no Beethoven… no God; we are the words; we are the music; we are the thing itself.

And yet, even at twenty-one, she understood how momentary these glimpses of elemental truth are — how easily this sense of inter-belonging, this thing-itselfness of being, slips out of our grasp. She continues the same 1903 diary entry with the swift pivot — as swift as the mind’s — from this awareness that “all the world is mind” to the habitual loss of perspective as the cotton wool drops over our eyes and unworlds us once more:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngThen I read a poem say — & the same thing is repeated. I feel as though I had grasped the central meaning of the world, & all these poets & historians & philosophers were only following out paths branching from that centre in which I stand. And then — some speck of dust gets into my machine I suppose, & the whole thing goes wrong again.

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Art by Shaun Tan from A Velocity of Being: Letters to a Young Reader. Available as a print.

More than a decade later, Woolf refined the sentiment in one of the extraordinary essays she composed during her quarter century as a critic for the Times Literary Supplement, newly collected in Genius and Ink: Virginia Woolf on How to Read (public library) — a book which, had I not been too consumed by rereading beloved books of yore to realize its publication, I would have ardently included among my favorite books of 2019.

Like the Nobel-winning Polish poet Wisława Szymborska, whose contemplative criticism uses books less as specimens for review than as springboards for soaring meditations on life and art, Woolf treats each book she reviews as a stone dropped from the coat-pocket into the Ouse of life, observing first its essential stoneness of form and then the widening circles of understanding rippling into the river of consciousness. Into the first essay from the collection, writing about Charlotte Brontë’s novels, Woolf nestles this exquisite insight into what makes a great work of art — the kind to which we keep returning again and again:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngThere is one peculiarity which real works of art possess in common. At each fresh reading one notices some change in them, as if the sap of life ran in their leaves, and with skies and plants they had the power to alter their shape and colour from season to season. To write down one’s impressions of Hamlet as one reads it year after year, would be virtually to record one’s own autobiography, for as we know more of life, so Shakespeare comments upon what we know.

Complement with Rebecca Solnit on why we read, André Gide on the five elements of a great work of art, and the young poet May Sarton’s arresting account of meeting Woolf, then revisit Woolf’s own arresting account of a total solar eclipse and her abiding insight into illnesslovegenderwriting and self-doubt, and the relationship between loneliness and creativity.

FORWARD TO A FRIEND/READ ONLINE/Like https://www.brainpickings.org/2020/01/23/virginia-woolf-genius-and-ink-reading/ on Facebook

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DhananjayParkhe

Did you know…

Did you know…

… that today is the Oscar Meyer Wienermobile’s Birthday? The first Oscar Meyer Wienermobile hit the road on July 18, 1936, and is now on display in the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. The nephew of Oscar Mayer, Carl G. Mayer, invented the car. Trivia buffs: Drivers of the Wienermobiles are known as Hotdoggers and often hand out toy whistles shaped as replicas of the Wienermobile, known as Wienerwhistles.

DhananjayParkhe

WORD OF THE DAY

WORD OF THE DAY
Aureate
OR-ee-eit
Part of speech: adjective
Origin: Latin, 15th century
1

Denoting, made of, or having the color of gold.

2

(of language) highly ornamented or elaborate.

Examples of Aureate in a sentence

“The aureate exterior of her jewelry box was only a preview of what was inside.”

“The book of poetry was written in an aureate style.”