Rumi Quote


That which God said to the rose,
and caused it to laugh in full-blown beauty,
He said to my heart,
and made it a hundred times more beautiful.
 “Jewels of Remembrance”

Did you know..


Did you know…

… that today is Chicken Wings Day? In 1977, the city of Buffalo, New York, declared July 29 as Chicken Wing Day, immortalizing the delicious food originating from that city. Celebrate with some Buffalo wings today!

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Don’t give up. Normally it is the last key on the ring which opens the doors.”

— Paulo Coelho

News from the Future: IFTF


Signals From the Future

🏊  AirBnB, but for swimming pools

When he noticed a neighbor’s pool that was rarely in use, Bunim Laskin came up with what is possibly the World’s Greatest Summer Idea. (Will lifeguarding become a gig?)

☁️  Advertisers want to program your dreams

Folks have always hacked sleep. But after Coors tried to slip their beer’s brand into unconscious minds, a cognitive neuroscientist is now calling for curbs on “targeted dream incubation.”

🚽  Toilet turns poop into power—and digital currency

In networked health, a South Korean professor has designed the BeeVi, a toilet that turns human waste into methane fuel; those who “go” can earn virtual currency. Hold the door!

 🍎  Leather-alternative fabric made from apple pulp

Speaking of waste, Beyond Leather combines apple waste with natural rubber to make Leap, which feels like the real stuff and whose production emits 85% less CO2 than leather’s.

 😶  Humans are becoming less creative

A University of William and Mary researcher who analyzed 300,000 test scores found that creativity began to nosedive in 1990. Turns out we’re too busy and entertained for it to fully blossom.

Newsletters I like: James Clear 3-2-1 Thursday


3-2-1 Newsletter by James Clear“The most wisdom per word of any newsletter on the web.”

3-2-1: How to excel, the health benefits of friendship, and the importance of bad days

read onJAMESCLEAR.COM | JULY 29, 2021

Happy 3-2-1 Thursday,

Here are 3 ideas, 2 quotes, and 1 question to consider this week…

3 Ideas From Me

I.

“The Cardinal Rule of Behavior Change:

What gets rewarded, gets repeated. What gets punished, gets avoided.

Don’t reward behavior you don’t want to see repeated.”

(Share this on Twitter)​


​II.

“The bad days are more important than the good days.

If you write or exercise or meditate or cook when you don’t feel like it, then you maintain the habit.

And if you maintain the habit, then all you need is time.”

(Share this on Twitter)​


III.

“You can usually accomplish more by giving something your full effort for a few years rather than giving it a lukewarm effort for fifty years.

Pick a priority for this season of your life and do it to the best of your ability.”

(Share this on Twitter)​

2 Quotes From Others

I.

Longevity researcher Dan Buettner on the health benefits of friendship:

“I argue that the most powerful thing you can do to add healthy years is to curate your immediate social network. In general, you want friends with whom you can have a meaningful conversation. You can call them on a bad day and they will care. Your group of friends are better than any drug or anti-aging supplement, and will do more for you than just about anything.”

Source: The Power of Positive People


​II.

Investor Graham Duncan on how to excel:

“[Tennis champion] Novak Djokovic said in an interview with the Financial Times that “I can carry on playing at this level because I like hitting the tennis ball.” The interviewer replied in surprise: “Are there really players who don’t like hitting the ball?” Djokovic answered, “Oh yes. There are people out there who don’t have the right motivation. You don’t need to talk to them. I can see it.”

If you can find the thing you do for its own sake, the compulsive piece of your process, and dial that up and up, beyond the imaginary ceiling for that activity you may be creating, my experience is the world comes to you for that thing and you massively outperform the others who don’t actually like hitting that particular ball. I think the rest of career advice is commentary on this essential truth.”

Source: Letter to a Friend Who May Start a New Investment Platform

1 Question For You

Faster. If I had to go from start to finish in half the time, what would I do?

Slower. If I could afford to spend double the time on it, what would I do?

If you enjoyed that, please share with others.

Share this newsletter on TwitterFacebookLinkedInWhatsApp, or via email.

Or, copy and paste the link below:

Until next week,

James Clear
Author of the multi-million-copy bestseller, Atomic Habits
Creator of the 
Habit Journal

Viand


WORD OF THE DAY
ViandVY-əndPart of speech: nounOrigin: Old French, late 14th century
1(usually viands) (archaic) An item of food.2(Philippines) A meat, seafood, or vegetable dish that accompanies rice in a typical Filipino meal.
 
Examples of Viand in a sentence “The lunch came with two savory viands.” “Her mother made an array of viands to accompany the starches. “

Newsletters: FP Situation Report


Foreign Policy Logo
Foreign Policy Situation Report - Your finger on the button
JULY 29, 2021 | VIEW IN BROWSER
SPONSORED BY RETHINKING AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY
By Robbie Gramer and Jack Detsch

Welcome to Foreign Policy’s SitRep! First off, hats off to Rep. Sean Casten and singer Fergie for making the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission cool again. (Although when were energy regulators ever not cool?)

Here’s what’s on tap for the day: Iraqi interpreters want an Afghan-style evacuation, Congress wants the Biden team to study up on China, more Biden ambassador nominees are coming out, and a look at who’s who in the Russian military.

Have feedback? Hit reply to let us know your thoughts.


Iraqi Interpreters Wait on Promise of U.S. Visas

The first plane full of Afghan interpreters being evacuated by U.S. President Joe Biden’s administration is set to touch down in the United States early Friday morning, according to Fox News. The administration has allocated $100 million to get 18,000 former interpreters out of the country to U.S. military bases and friendly countries on private flights, a plan the White House has dubbed “Operation Allies Refuge.”

All the while, Iraqi interpreters who helped the United States during the 2003 Iraq War and in the fight against the Islamic State are still waiting for their promised ticket to the United States. Iraqis have not been allowed to submit applications since 2015, and a massive backlog has piled up over the past half decade.

“The vast majority of Iraqis applied through the P-2 visa program,” Matt Zeller, co-founder of No One Left Behind, an advocacy group pushing for the resettlement of Afghan and Iraqi interpreters, told SitRep. “At the current rate of processing, it will take 220 years.” Worse yet, the U.S. State Department suspects as many as 4,000 Iraqis have filed fraudulent resettlement applications, something that could gum up the works even further.

‘We are considered the second enemy.’ But most have precious little time to waste. Iraqi interpreters have been getting more fearful for their safety ever since a U.S.-ordered drone strike took out Iranian Quds Force leader Qasem Soleimani at Baghdad International Airport last year, deepening an ongoing military tit for tat between the U.S. military and Iran-backed proxy groups hoping to speed up a U.S. exit from the country.

“We are considered the second enemy after U.S. forces for the Iran-backed militias,” Ali Alobaidi, who served as an interpreter for U.S. forces during the 2003 Iraq War before working for European forces during the counter-Islamic State campaign, told SitRep. “They consider us spies and agents of the Americans.”

Left behind. With no avenue to get a hearing with the Biden administration and U.S. combat forces set to leave Iraq soon, Alobaidi and his friends have taken to social media to try and get the message out. A group of jilted Iraqi interpreters have set up a group dubbed “Iraqi Interpreters Left Behind” that gins up dozens of messages per day. But as muddled as the Afghan battlefield looks with the Taliban advancing throughout the country, the Islamic State’s rise has likely left many Iraqi interpreters without documents or the ability to prove they helped the United States.

Some advocates who helped push for Afghan evacuations plan to turn their attention to Iraqi interpreters after the U.S. drawdown from Afghanistan is finished. Zeller told SitRep he’s pushing lawmakers to reopen the Iraqi visa program through negotiations over the Defense Department’s authorization bill. It’s an uphill battle. He has yet to get any commitments, and Congress would have to mandate the State Department to begin accepting new applicants.

And even then, they might not get that far: The United States has never accepted more than 4,000 special immigrant visas in a year before 2021. And lawmakers are still wondering what it will take to do the program right.

“The big question they keep asking us is: ‘Okay, well, if we do allow this, if we do turn this back on, how long and how many?’ How many people do you think are going to need it? How long do you think we need to keep this application period open for?” Zeller asked. “Those are really good questions.”


Rethinking American Grand Strategy assembles a roster of leading historians to examine America’s place in the world. Its innovative chapters re-examine familiar figures while also revealing the forgotten episodes and hidden voices of American grand strategy. Learn more.

Let’s Get Personnel

The Senate has been busy finalizing confirmations for a number of Biden’s Defense Department nominees. Air Force Secretary Frank Kendall III was confirmed on Monday, leaving Navy Secretary-designate the only Biden service chief nominee still holding in Congress. His deputy, Gina Ortiz Jones, was confirmed last week.

Ely Ratner, the top Pentagon official for the Indo-Pacific, got through late last week as did Heidi Shyu, the Pentagon’s research and engineering chief.

Biden announced five new ambassador nominees this week: Mark Gitenstein to the European Union; Julissa Reynoso Pantaleón to Spain; Laura Holgate to United Nations organizations in Vienna; Patricia Mahoney to the Central African Republic; and Peter Vrooman to Mozambique.

Republicans on the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee announced they intend to oppose two of Biden’s Treasury Department nominees, Brian Nelson and Elizabeth Rosenberg, until the administration implements mandatory sanctions on a controversial Russian gas pipeline project. (Background on that here, and a reminder that Sen. Ted Cruz is doing the same with dozens of State Department nominees in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.)

Trump’s former ambassador to the United Nations, Kelly Knight Craft, has joined the board of the Institute for the Study of War.

Former Justice Department official Thea Kendler is Biden’s pick to be the Commerce Department’s assistant secretary for export administration.


Get Rec’d 

Hey SitRep readers: We’re putting in one last call for our summer reading list. Thanks to all who have sent in suggestions so far!

For those who haven’t, send us everything you’ve got, from former U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher biographies to cool sci-fi reads (that are at least tangentially relevant for the natsec wonks) or from graphic novels and academic journals to Nobel prize-winning poetry and your favorite beach reads.

We’ll winnow it down and publish our list with all of your recommendations next week—just in time for your beach vacation.


Weekly Dossier 

What should be at the top of your radar, if it isn’t already.

All in for open-source intelligence. At the height of the Cold War, the CIA ran an open-source intelligence unit called the Foreign Broadcast Information Service that translated and distributed Soviet and other foreign government statements and media. Now, a group of lawmakers, led by Democratic Reps. Joaquin Castro and Bill Keating and Republican Reps. Mike Gallagher and Brian Fitzpatrick, want to revive that concept, with an aim toward establishing a new government center that would translate and freely publish foreign government reports, documents, and state media articles for policymakers and media alike—with a special focus on China.

The new legislation allocates $85 million to stand up the Open Translation and Analysis Center in the first year, Fiscal Year 2022, and then $80 million for FY2023 through 2026. It’s already got some high-profile endorses, including David Stilwell, the former top State Department envoy for East Asia during the Trump administration, who feels there’s a major gap in how most Americans, researchers, and media understand China and how China views itself.

Quid pro oh no. In the latest sign that China is using its vaccine stocks as a blunt tool for geopolitical pressure, news emerged this week that Beijing pressured Ukraine to drop support for international condemnation of its genocide against ethnic Uyghurs in the country’s Xinjiang province. How? By threatening to curb trade with Ukraine and withhold access to COVID-19 vaccines, as Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty’s Yevhen Solonyna and Reid Standish reported.

Grounded. One big new trend we’ve been reporting on recently is Congress’s eagerness to claw back the reins of foreign policy from the executive branch after decades of taking the backseat. The latest example is on the arms control front. The top Democrat and Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee are holding up a major arms sale deal with Nigeria the State Department first brought forward in January, which Robbie scooped this week.

Lawmakers are blocking an $875 million arms deal for Nigeria to acquire 12 attack helicopters to assist in its fight against the Boko Haram terrorist group; they’re concerned about Nigeria’s recent bent toward authoritarianism and the Nigerian military’s less-than-stellar human rights record.


Snapshot 

U.S Marines from MRF-D (Marine Rotational Force Darwin) disembark from a V-22 Osprey during a troop insertion as part of Exercise “Talisman Sabre 21,” a major joint U.S.-Australian military training exercise, in Townsville, Australia, on July 27.


What We’re Reading

Inside baseball. Russia security expert Kirill Shamiev has a fascinating new report out for the Center for Strategic and International Studies that examines all the leadership dynamics within the Russian military—basically, who’s got Russian President Vladimir Putin’s ear and who doesn’t.


Put On Your Radar

August 3: The Senate Armed Services Committee holds a nomination hearing for Lt. Gen. Laura Richardson to be the next commander of U.S. Southern Command.

August 3: Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman and acting State Department Legal Adviser Richard Visek testify before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

August 4: One year anniversary of the Beirut explosion.

August 5: An event analyzing Russia’s major military exercise, Zapad 2021, hosted by the Center for European Policy Analysis.


Quote of the Week

“​​I’ll never politicize the work you do. You have my word on that.”

—U.S. President Joe Biden taking a not-so-subtle dig at former U.S. President Trump during publicized remarks to members of the intelligence community at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence on Tuesday


Whiskey Tango Foxtrot

Ever Given docks at lastWe know it’s been a busy year, but surely SitRep readers will remember that container ship that got wedged in the Suez Canal back in March. The Ever Given has finally docked in the Dutch port of Rotterdam after being released by Egyptian authorities on July 7.


That’s it for this week.

For more from Foreign Policy, subscribe here or sign up for our other newsletters. You can find older editions of Situation Report here. If you have tips, comments, questions, or corrections, you can reply to this email.

Photos: Ghaith Abdul-Ahad/Getty Images (top), Ian Hitchcock/Getty Images

Newsletters I like : FP South Asia Brief


JULY 29, 2021 | VIEW IN BROWSER
By Michael Kugelman

Welcome to Foreign Policy’s South Asia Brief.

The highlights this week: Afghanistan takes on more importance in U.S.-India relations, India’s monsoon season turns deadly, and a horrific murder sparks debate about domestic violence in Pakistan.

Have feedback? Hit reply to let me know your thoughts.


The Afghanistan Factor

Shared concern about China is the core driver of the U.S.-India partnership, but in recent months, other priorities have intervened. When Indian External Affairs Minister S. Jaishankar visited Washington in May, COVID-19 cooperation was the main focus. Now, it’s Afghanistan.

This week, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken traveled to India, where his meetings covered a variety of topics: U.S. Indo-Pacific policy, the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue—known as the Quad, the pandemic, and climate change. Blinken also addressed civil society leaders with a focus on India’s democratic backsliding—an indication the Biden administration isn’t afraid to engage on issues New Delhi would prefer it avoid.

But Afghanistan undoubtedly loomed large over the visit, given the central focus the U.S. withdrawal occupies in the Biden administration’s South Asia policy and India’s growing involvement in Afghanistan-focused regional diplomacy. It figured prominently in Blinken’s meetings and in his public comments during the trip.

U.S. and Indian interests align on many levels, but they differ on Afghanistan. Biden’s decision to fully withdraw will ultimately strengthen the Taliban, which have attacked Indian interests and nationals. The fragile U.S.-sponsored intra-Afghan dialogue also intends to produce a political settlement that gives the Taliban a share of the power. That outcome would advantage Pakistan, the Taliban’s ally and India’s rival. (Afghanistan hasn’t had a pro-Pakistan government since U.S. forces overthrew the Taliban regime in 2001.)

India has invested heavily in Afghanistan, including granting $3 billion in development assistance since 2001, and has enjoyed close ties with all post-Taliban governments. But India now worries Pakistan and China, its two main rivals, will fill the vacuum left by the United States and deepen their influence. This week, Beijing hosted a visiting Taliban delegation.

India has shifted its policy in recent weeks. In June, New Delhi sought to open formal communication channels with the Taliban for the first time, becoming the last major regional player to do so. It has also widened its engagement with the Afghan political class. India wants to gain more influence by expanding its links beyond those in government. This week, ThePrint reported New Delhi is “engaging with ‘all stakeholders’ to the Afghan situation, which includes the Taliban.”

As C. Raja Mohan wrote in Foreign Policy this week, India is also increasing its participation in Afghanistan-focused regional diplomacy, most recently through its involvement in conferences in Central Asia. This is welcome news for the United States: Most of Afghanistan’s neighbors are either U.S. rivals, such as China, Iran, and Russia, or difficult partners, such as Pakistan and Turkey. The Biden administration wants its friends to play more of a role in shaping a so far elusive regional consensus on the way forward for Afghanistan.

This isn’t to diminish the importance of other issues discussed during Blinken’s visit to New Delhi. With India fearing another COVID-19 surge, U.S. pandemic assistance remains critical; Blinken announced an additional $25 million in aid. China-focused cooperation is also still essential. India and the United States each faced recent cyberattacks blamed on China. Both countries are keen to maintain momentum with the Quad; Washington may host a meeting of leaders in September.

Finally, U.S.-India differences on Afghanistan won’t melt away anytime soon. Concerned Indian leaders likely asked Blinken about the U.S. policy of close cooperation with Pakistan on Afghanistan-related issues. Pakistan’s national security advisor and head of its main spy agency arrived in Washington for a visit on Tuesday. Ultimately, Pakistan’s large role in the Afghan peace process and China’s growing influence may limit India’s options.

Nevertheless, the stars are aligned for more U.S.-India cooperation on Afghanistan. The United States is pushing for more regional engagement at a moment when India—one of Afghanistan’s only neighbors with cordial ties with Washington—is stepping up its game.

Read all of Foreign Policy’s coverage of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan here.

THE Marshall Goldsmith Newsletter


My mission is simple. I want to help successful people achieve positive, lasting change in behavior; for themselves, their people, and their teams. I want to help you make your life a little better. Thank you for subscribing! Life is good.


Does Your Boss Squash Your Enthusiasm?

He or she may have the classic bad habit of Adding Too Much Value.

If you feel like your boss is squashing your enthusiasm for your ideas and projects, it may be that he or she has the classic bad habit of Adding Too Much Value.

This bad habit can be defined as your boss’s overwhelming desire to add his or her two cents to every discussion, and it is common among leaders who are used to running the show. It is extremely difficult for successful people to listen to other people tell them something that they think already know without communicating somehow that (a) they already knew it and (b) they know a better way.

WHAT IS THE PROBLEM WITH ADDING TOO MUCH VALUE?

It would seem like it would be better for all concerned if our ideas were always improved upon. It’s not. Imagine as an energetic, enthusiastic employee you go to your boss’s office and excitedly share your idea with your boss. Your boss thinks it’s a great idea and instead of saying, “Great idea,” she says, “That’s a nice idea. Why don’t you add this to it?” What does this do? It deflates your enthusiasm; it dampers your commitment. While the quality of the idea may go up 5 percent, your commitment to execute it may go down 50 percent. That’s because it’s no longer your idea, it’s now her idea.

An exceptional leader will take heart of the following equation:

Effectiveness of Execution = a) Quality of the idea X b) My commitment to make it work.

Effectiveness of execution is a function of a) What is the quality of the idea? times b) What is my employee’s commitment to make it work? Oftentimes, our leaders get so wrapped up in trying to improve the quality of an idea a little that they damage our commitment to execute it a lot. And as you rise in levels of leadership in the organization, it’s important to recognize that the higher you go, the more you need to make other people winners and not make it about winning yourself.

A LESSON IN ADDING VALUE FROM A GREAT CEO

I asked my coaching client J.P. Garnier, former CEO of the large pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmith Kline, “What did you learn from me when I was your executive coach that helped you the most as a leader?” He said, “You taught me one lesson that helped me to become a better leader and live a happier life. You taught me that before I speak I should stop, breathe, and ask myself, ‘Is it worth it?’ He said that when he got into the habit of taking a breath before he talked, he realized that at least half of what he was going to say wasn’t worth saying. Even though he believed he could add value, he realized he had more to gain by not saying anything.

The flipside to this concept is that we often take leaders’ suggestions as orders. I asked J.P, “What did you learn about leadership as the CEO?” He said, “I learned a very hard lesson. My suggestions become orders. If they’re smart, they’re orders. If they’re stupid, they’re orders. If I want them to be orders, they are orders. And, if I don’t want them to be orders, they are orders anyway.”

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR LEADERS AND PEOPLE WHO WANT TO BE LEADERS?

It means learning how to closely monitor how you hand out encouragement and suggestions. If you find yourself saying, “Great idea,” and following it with “But,” or “However,” try cutting your response off at “idea.” Even better, before you speak, take a breath and ask yourself if what you’re about to say is worth it. You may realize that you have more to gain by not winning (adding value)!

Life is good. Marshall.

30 July


International Day of Friendship – 30 July

International friendship day content marketing ideas

This day is celebrated to honor those friends in your life that have made all the difference.

Content marketing ideas:   

  • Listicle idea: X Signs to recognize healthy friendships
  • Infographic idea: X Activities you can do with friends to bond with them
  • Video idea: X Best fictional friendships to make your heart melt
  • Podcast idea: Is it a good idea to mix business with friendships?

A brand campaign that worked:

This ad by Carlsberg puts friendship to the test by conducting an experiment to find out if the participant’s friends are willing to help them out if they get into trouble in the middle of the night.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vs1wMp84_BA

 

World Day against Trafficking in Persons – 30 July

World-Day-against-Trafficking-in-Persons July 2021

This day is celebrated to raise awareness of the situation of victims of human trafficking and for the promotion and protection of their rights.

Content marketing ideas:   

  • Listicle idea: X Organizations that work against human trafficking
  • Infographic idea: X Countries with the highest rates of human trafficking
  • Video idea: What are the causes of human trafficking?
  • Podcast idea: How can you rescue someone if you suspect they are being trafficked?

A brand campaign that worked:

This video by Kent Police shows how modern-day slavery and trafficking is more rampant than one thinks and how to recognize signs of it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkSU5r9rdUY

John Muir on What Nature Can Teach Us About Life


John Muir on What Nature Can Teach Us About Life

Few names are as synonymous with nature as that of writer and naturalist John Muir. Muir was born in 1838 in Dunbar, Scotland, and his family immigrated to the United States in 1849, initially settling in Wisconsin. As a young man, Muir traveled the northern United States and Canada, then went to Cuba and Panama. His travels continued, but he made California his home in 1868. And it was in California that Muir found his greatest inspiration: the Sierra Nevada and Yosemite.

Muir spent much of his time in the Sierra Nevada, calling it “the most divinely beautiful of all the mountain chains I have ever seen.” In the 1870s, he began studying the range extensively, and his writings attracted the public’s attention. His readers were inspired by the way he wrote about mountains, glaciers, and forests, and the way he captured nature in all its glory. He became a celebrated naturalist and environmental philosopher, and his words carried weight. In 1890, Muir was instrumental in convincing the U.S. Congress to create Yosemite National Park, which paved the way for the National Park System. When Muir published Our National Parks, he came to the attention of President Theodore Roosevelt. In 1903, the two men met in Yosemite, where their conversations helped shape Roosevelt’s groundbreaking conservation programs.

Today, John Muir is often called the father of the National Park System. He was a man of great passion and great learning, and his greatest teacher was nature. The wilderness, for Muir, was a place of both exceptional beauty and knowledge. As Muir famously said, “One day’s exposure to mountains is better than a cartload of books.” It’s a sentiment he would repeat in numerous works and speeches. Here are 14 quotes from Muir about the lessons nature has to teach us.

Few places in this world are more dangerous than home. Fear not, therefore, to try the mountain-passes. They will kill care, save you from deadly apathy, set you free, and call forth every faculty into vigorous, enthusiastic action. Even the sick should try these so-called dangerous passes, because for every unfortunate they kill, they cure a thousand.
– “The Mountains of California,” 1894

Few are altogether deaf to the preaching of pine-trees. Their sermons on the mountains go to our hearts; and if people in general could be got into the woods, even for once, to hear the trees speak for themselves, all difficulties in the way of forest preservation would vanish.
– “Speech at a meeting of the Sierra Club,” 1895

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.
– “Our National Parks,” 1901

I am learning nothing in this trivial world of men. I must break away and get out into the mountains to learn the news.
– “John Muir quoted by Samuel Hall Young in “Alaska Days with John Muir,” 1915

Let children walk with nature, let them see the beautiful blendings and communions of death and life, their joyous inseparable unity, as taught in woods and meadows, plains and mountains and streams of our blessed star, and they will learn that death is stingless indeed, and as beautiful as life, and that the grave has no victory, for it never fights. All is divine harmony.
– “A Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf,” 1916

In every walk with Nature one receives far more than he seeks.
– “Steep Trails,” 1918

It has been said that trees are imperfect men, and seem to bemoan their imprisonment rooted in the ground. But they never seem so to me. I never saw a discontented tree.
– “John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir,” 1938

The mountains are fountains of men as well as of rivers, of glaciers, of fertile soil. The great poets, philosophers, prophets, able men whose thoughts and deeds have moved the world, have come down from the mountains — mountain dwellers who have grown strong there with the forest trees in Nature’s workshops.
– “John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir,” 1938

How little note is taken of the deeds of Nature! What paper publishes her reports? Who publishes the sheet-music of the winds, or the written music of water written in river-lines? Who reports and works and ways of the clouds, those wondrous creations coming into being every day like freshly upheaved mountains? And what record is kept of Nature’s colors — the clothes she wears — of her birds, her beasts — her live-stock?
– “John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir,” 1938

One day’s exposure to mountains is better than cartloads of books. See how willingly Nature poses herself upon photographers’ plates. No earthly chemicals are so sensitive as those of the human soul. All that is required is exposure, and purity of material.
– “John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir,” 1938

Between every two pine trees there is a door leading to a new way of life.
– A note written by John Muir in the margin of volume I of “Prose Works” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

We all travel the milky way together, trees and men.
– “A Wind Storm in the Forests of the Yuba,” “Scribner’s Monthly,” 1894

Surely all God’s people, however serious and savage, great or small, like to play. Whales and elephants, dancing, humming gnats, and invisibly small mischievous microbes, — all are warm with divine radium and must have lots of fun in them.
– “The Story of My Boyhood and Youth,” 1913

Most people are on the world, not in it — have no conscious sympathy or relationship to anything about them — undiffused, separate, and rigidly alone like marbles of polished stone, touching but separate.
– “John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir,” 1938


6 Famous Movie Lines By Screenwriters You’ve Never Heard OfApril 7, 2021

Share using facebook
Share using twitter
Share using email

All great movies begin on the page. Screenwriters labor for years over their words, striving to draft stories that will resonate through time. After directors, actors, producers, cinematographers, and designers have all worked their magic, it can be easy to forget how the project started. Only a handful of writers ever gain celebrity status for their work (think Quentin Tarantino, Stanley Kubrick, Francis Ford Coppola), while many others go unnoticed by the public, despite writing some of the most enduring lines in film history. In honor of these unsung heroes of the entertainment industry, we’ve compiled a list of famous movie lines by writers you may never have heard of.

I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore.
 Paddy Chayefsky

Even if you’ve never seen the 1976 film Network, chances are you’ve heard the line. It was originally delivered by actor Peter Finch playing TV newsman Howard Beale. In the scene, the character, who is about to lose his job and coming a little unhinged at the prospect, engages in an on-air rant for the ages, insisting that people go to their windows and yell it with him: “I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore.” The spectacular speech was penned by writer Sidney Aaron “Paddy” Chayefsky. In his 30-year career, Chayefsky is credited with dozens of movies, plays, and TV series. He won three Academy Awards and was nominated for a fourth before his death in 1981.

E.T. phone home.
 Melissa Mathison

Melissa Mathison’s screenplay for Steven Spielberg’s 1982 film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial earned her an Academy Award in 1983. Anyone who grew up in the ‘80s will have trouble hearing the words “E.T. phone home” without raising a finger to point at the sky. It’s the iconic  moment when Eliot (Henry Thomas) finally realizes what his new alien friend is trying to tell him. What most of us don’t know is that Mathison was also the writer behind a number of other memorable movies, including The Black StallionThe Indian in the CupboardKundun, and The BFG, which was released in 2016, shortly after Mathison’s death in 2015.

Wax on, wax off.
 Robert Mark Kamen

In addition to his 1984 film The Karate Kid, Robert Mark Kamen wrote The Fifth ElementA Walk in the CloudsGladiator, and many more. His list of credits is impressive, but it’s this line — “wax on, wax off” — that echoes through the ages. Thanks in large part to actor Pat Morita’s delivery, the words evoke the image of a wise master bestowing wisdom that the student has yet to understand. In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Kamen was quoted as being surprised that the famous words were even remembered. “The crane at the end…” he said. “I wanted that to be the big moment. If I thought anyone remembered anything they’d remember that.”

The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn’t exist.
 Christopher McQuarrie

Iterations of this quote have appeared in literature for nearly 200 years, but it was screenwriter Christopher McQuarrie who gave it to the pitiful character of Verbal Kint in the 1995 movie The Usual Suspects. McQuarrie won the Oscar that year for Best Original Screenplay and went on to write The Way of the GunJack ReacherThe Mummy, four Mission Impossible screenplays and the 2021 reboot Top Gun: Maverick. In fact, if you’ve heard McQuarrie’s name anywhere lately, it’s probably been in association with Tom Cruise, as the two have worked on several recent projects together.

That’ll do, pig.
 George Miller

Born in Australia, screenwriter George Miller is best known for his film Mad Max: Fury Road, which is widely hailed as one of the greatest action films ever made. But his portfolio has a soft side too, as evidenced by the touching family film Babe. In the movie, James Cromwell plays Farmer Hoggett, a reserved man not prone to lavish words. When his pig wins the sheep herding competition, the farmer looks down and simply says, “That’ll do, pig. That’ll do.” Miller’s production company acquired the rights to the story in the 1980s, but it took a decade for the available technology to catch up with Miller’s aspirations for the film. When it was released in 1995, it won the Oscar for Best Visual Effect for its depictions of talking animals.

Wakanda forever.
 Ryan Coogler

This traditional greeting from the fictional land of Wakanda is always given with the right arm crossed over the left. The phrase, which has come to signify dignity and excellence, was co-written by Ryan Coogler, who was 32 years old when Black Panther was released in 2018. His previous screenplays include Fruitvale Station (nominated for 57 different awards) and Creed (which earned Sylvester Stallone an Academy Award nomination in 2016). However, it remains to be seen if screenwriting will be Coogler’s legacy. He is slated to direct the Black Panther sequel in 2022, and the recent film Judas and the Black Messiah, which Coogler produced, has been nominated for six Academy Awards.

6 Famous Movie Lines By Screenwriters You’ve Never Heard Of


6 Famous Movie Lines By Screenwriters You’ve Never Heard OfApril 7, 2021

Share using facebook
Share using twitter
Share using email

All great movies begin on the page. Screenwriters labor for years over their words, striving to draft stories that will resonate through time. After directors, actors, producers, cinematographers, and designers have all worked their magic, it can be easy to forget how the project started. Only a handful of writers ever gain celebrity status for their work (think Quentin Tarantino, Stanley Kubrick, Francis Ford Coppola), while many others go unnoticed by the public, despite writing some of the most enduring lines in film history. In honor of these unsung heroes of the entertainment industry, we’ve compiled a list of famous movie lines by writers you may never have heard of.

I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore.
 Paddy Chayefsky

Even if you’ve never seen the 1976 film Network, chances are you’ve heard the line. It was originally delivered by actor Peter Finch playing TV newsman Howard Beale. In the scene, the character, who is about to lose his job and coming a little unhinged at the prospect, engages in an on-air rant for the ages, insisting that people go to their windows and yell it with him: “I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore.” The spectacular speech was penned by writer Sidney Aaron “Paddy” Chayefsky. In his 30-year career, Chayefsky is credited with dozens of movies, plays, and TV series. He won three Academy Awards and was nominated for a fourth before his death in 1981.

E.T. phone home.
 Melissa Mathison

Melissa Mathison’s screenplay for Steven Spielberg’s 1982 film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial earned her an Academy Award in 1983. Anyone who grew up in the ‘80s will have trouble hearing the words “E.T. phone home” without raising a finger to point at the sky. It’s the iconic  moment when Eliot (Henry Thomas) finally realizes what his new alien friend is trying to tell him. What most of us don’t know is that Mathison was also the writer behind a number of other memorable movies, including The Black StallionThe Indian in the CupboardKundun, and The BFG, which was released in 2016, shortly after Mathison’s death in 2015.

Wax on, wax off.
 Robert Mark Kamen

In addition to his 1984 film The Karate Kid, Robert Mark Kamen wrote The Fifth ElementA Walk in the CloudsGladiator, and many more. His list of credits is impressive, but it’s this line — “wax on, wax off” — that echoes through the ages. Thanks in large part to actor Pat Morita’s delivery, the words evoke the image of a wise master bestowing wisdom that the student has yet to understand. In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Kamen was quoted as being surprised that the famous words were even remembered. “The crane at the end…” he said. “I wanted that to be the big moment. If I thought anyone remembered anything they’d remember that.”

The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn’t exist.
 Christopher McQuarrie

Iterations of this quote have appeared in literature for nearly 200 years, but it was screenwriter Christopher McQuarrie who gave it to the pitiful character of Verbal Kint in the 1995 movie The Usual Suspects. McQuarrie won the Oscar that year for Best Original Screenplay and went on to write The Way of the GunJack ReacherThe Mummy, four Mission Impossible screenplays and the 2021 reboot Top Gun: Maverick. In fact, if you’ve heard McQuarrie’s name anywhere lately, it’s probably been in association with Tom Cruise, as the two have worked on several recent projects together.

That’ll do, pig.
 George Miller

Born in Australia, screenwriter George Miller is best known for his film Mad Max: Fury Road, which is widely hailed as one of the greatest action films ever made. But his portfolio has a soft side too, as evidenced by the touching family film Babe. In the movie, James Cromwell plays Farmer Hoggett, a reserved man not prone to lavish words. When his pig wins the sheep herding competition, the farmer looks down and simply says, “That’ll do, pig. That’ll do.” Miller’s production company acquired the rights to the story in the 1980s, but it took a decade for the available technology to catch up with Miller’s aspirations for the film. When it was released in 1995, it won the Oscar for Best Visual Effect for its depictions of talking animals.

Wakanda forever.
 Ryan Coogler

This traditional greeting from the fictional land of Wakanda is always given with the right arm crossed over the left. The phrase, which has come to signify dignity and excellence, was co-written by Ryan Coogler, who was 32 years old when Black Panther was released in 2018. His previous screenplays include Fruitvale Station (nominated for 57 different awards) and Creed (which earned Sylvester Stallone an Academy Award nomination in 2016). However, it remains to be seen if screenwriting will be Coogler’s legacy. He is slated to direct the Black Panther sequel in 2022, and the recent film Judas and the Black Messiah, which Coogler produced, has been nominated for six Academy Awards.

WaterWorld Day


Did you know…

… that today is Waterworld Day? Waterworld, starring Kevin Costner, opened in 1995. Costing almost $200 million to make, it was the most expensive movie ever made at that time because of crew injuries, tsunami warnings, a sinking set, disputes between Kevin Costner and Kevin Reynolds, the director and more. The film grossed a mere $88 million at the U.S. box office but did much better overseas, with $176 million at the foreign box office.

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“You have to decide if you’re going to wilt like a daisy or if you’re just going to go forward and live the life that you’ve been granted.”

— Kevin Costner

International Tiger Day – 29 July


International Tiger Day – 29 July

Tiger day July 2021

This day is commemorated to raise awareness about tiger conservation.

Content marketing ideas:   

  • Listicle idea: X Things you can do if an animal escapes from the zoo
  • Infographic idea: X Fictional tigers you should know about
  • Video idea: How does a tiger’s stripes help with camouflage?
  • Podcast idea: Are forest reserves better than forests to ensure tigers’ survival?

A brand campaign that worked:

This ad by Australia Zoo shows the majesty of tigers and why they should be saved at any cost.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3FnM3u02-I

 

Don’t farm bugs


Insect farming bakes, boils and shreds animals by the trillion. It’s immoral, risky and won’t resolve the climate crisis

Newletters I like : Ethical Alliance’s Newsletter


ethiXbase InsightsCase Study: Automating Third-Party Compliance Workflow For An Agribusiness Company
The complexities of managing a global agriculture operation are immense, especially when the company’s fundamental operations rely on trading with third parties, many of which are small farms in high-risk areas. Without a simple, straightforward system — disarray can easily ensue; and for this company, with limited compliance resources, the challenge was significant. Read moreBlog: Identifying and managing modern slavery in the construction industry 
Modern slavery within the construction sector is rife and accounts for 18% of global forced labour cases. Read more as we explore why the construction industry is more vulnerable to modern slavery risks and what can we do to prevent modern slavery from occurring.Video: What is ESG reporting and why is it important?
ESG encapsulate an organisation’s long-term non-financial health. Today, ESG covers three core pillars. Strong performance across all three pillars of ESG is indicative of business resilience. Watch the video now as we discuss how ESG can be measured and scored, and what we can do to improve ESG performance.Editor’s Selection

New Zealand: New Zealand buying more from Chinese region linked to forced labour
Jul 27, 2021 04:00 pm
As countries around the world try to stop the importation of goods produced using forced labour in Xinjiang, China, New Zealand has actually increased their imports. Exports from the region where up to a million
Read More  
 

Ireland: Irish food sustainability to fore with minister to address UN summit
Jul 27, 2021 03:45 pm
Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Charlie McConalogue is to address a major UN food systems summit on Ireland’s role in being one of the global leaders in sustainable food production. At the summit,
Read More  

United Kingdom: Former Glencore trader pleads guilty in New York over Nigerian oil bribery scheme
Jul 27, 2021 03:30 pm
A former U.K.-based trader for Glencore Plc pleaded guilty on Monday over what U.S. prosecutors called his role in a scheme to bribe officials in Nigeria in exchange for favourable contracts from that country’s state-owned
Read More  

Brazil: Closing arguments in Odebrecht US$92M bribes case
Jul 27, 2021 03:20 pm
The trial of the six defendants in the case of the US$92 million from Odebrecht bribes enters the final stretch today, a stage in which the Justice Ministry and the accused will begin their closing
Read More  

United States: Commodity trader Freepoint faces U.S. bribery probe, sources say
Jul 27, 2021 03:15 pm
The U.S. Justice Department is investigating Connecticut-based trading house Freepoint Commodities over whether payments to employees of Brazil’s state-run oil company broke U.S. laws, two sources with knowledge of the matter told Reuters this week.
Read More  

United States: FirstEnergy charged in Ohio bribery scheme, agrees to deferred prosecution settlement for $230 million
Jul 27, 2021 03:00 pm
Akron-based FirstEnergy will pay a $230 million fine for bribing key Ohio officials in a calculated quest to secure a $1 billion ratepayer-funded bailout for two nuclear plants and fend off future rate hikes. FirstEnergy’s fine – while far from
Read More  
 This email goes out to more than 29000 compliance and legal professionals on a routine basis.
Interested in featuring in our newsletter?
Contact us at marketing@ethixbase.com

The Marshall Goldsmith Newletter


     
 

My mission is simple. I want to help successful people achieve positive, lasting change in behavior; for themselves, their people, and their teams. I want to help you make your life a little better. Thank you for subscribing! Life is good.


   

Join me and my dear friend Martin Lindstrom when we go LIVE on LinkedIn this Thursday, July 29th at 12pm EST for the next episode of the M&M show! We will be joined by our two incredible guests, authors and business professors Erin Meyer and Gary Hamel to discuss how organizations should prepare for change in a post-covid world. Be sure to turn on post reminders to be notified when we go live: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/marshallgoldsmith_the-mm-show-the-post-covid-world-join-activity-6825836151279017984-OX_L.

For those of you who aren’t already familiar with our guests this week…

Erin Meyer is a professor at INSEAD, one of the leading international business schools. Her work focuses on how the world’s most successful managers navigate the complexities of cultural differences in a global environment. She works tirelessly helping companies to develop organizational cultures that breed both flexibility and innovation and offers cutting-edge strategies to improve the effectiveness of projects that span the globe. 

Gary Hamel is one of the world’s most influential and iconoclastic business thinkers. He has worked with leading companies across the globe and is a dynamic and sought-after management speaker. Most notably, Gary has been on the faculty of the London Business School for more than 30 years and is the director of the Management Lab. 

I hope to see all of you there, this is going to be a good one!

Life is good. Marshall.

Did you know…


Did you know…

… that today is National Love is Kind Day? This day is an opportunity to say no to abuse, violence, and ridicule, and yes to kindness. Kindness is the path to healthy and safer relationships, families, society, and the world. Because kindness rules!

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Three things in human life are important. The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. And the third is to be kind.”

— Henry James

World Hepatitis Day – 28 July


World Hepatitis Day – 28 July

World Hepatitis Day Content Marketing Ideas

This day is celebrated to encourage governments to step up their response to the ever-present threat of hepatitis.

Content marketing ideas:   

  • Listicle idea: X Diseases that can develop in a person suffering from hepatitis
  • Infographic idea: Which countries are most affected by hepatitis and its variants?
  • Video idea: Here’s how your liver shutting down can affect other parts of the body
  • Podcast idea: How should you change your lifestyle if you have contracted hepatitis?

A brand campaign that worked:

This ad by UNICEF India features Amitabh Bachchan who talks about how he overcame hepatitis and encourages others to get vaccinated against this deadly disease.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qw3ur-DmdLA

Quotes From 10 Entrepreneurs on the Importance of Failure


Quotes From 10 Entrepreneurs on the Importance of Failure

Share using facebook
Share using twitter
Share using email


When Albert Einstein said, “I think and think for months and years. Ninety-nine times, the conclusion is false. The hundredth time I am right,” he was making a powerful statement about failure: It’s inevitable — but it doesn’t have to be a bad thing. Failure is one of the most powerful motivators we can encounter. It pushes us to do better (after we get over the initial sting of the loss, of course). It encourages us to keep trying. And in a lot of cases, it can show us just how close we are to success. The trick is to think of it in a positive light: Failure is an agent of growth, not of defeat.

Entrepreneurs and innovators around the world have been using failure as motivation for centuries. Whether it’s something as simple as realizing that a single setback isn’t going to ruin your progress, or something more complex, like using the details of the failure to grow a success, it’s almost always a benefit. These 10 quotes show that while everyone experiences failure at some point — and sometimes repeatedly — it doesn’t have to be a roadblock. Failure can actually be a force of positivity in our lives, even a necessary step in achieving our dreams.

Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.
 Thomas Edison

Even if you fail at your ambitious thing, it’s very hard to fail completely.
 Larry Page

Failure and invention are inseparable twins.
 Jeff Bezos

I can accept failure. Everyone fails at something. But I can’t accept not trying.
 Michael Jordan

With engineering, I view this year’s failure as next year’s opportunity to try it again. Failures are not something to be avoided. You want to have them happen as quickly as you can so you can make progress rapidly.
 Intel co-founder Gordon Moore

Failure is an event, not a person. Yesterday ended last night.
 Motivational speaker and business coach Zig Ziglar

In my experience, each failure contains the seeds of your next success — if you are willing to learn from it.
 Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen

There’s no such thing as failure. There are only results.
 Motivational speaker and business coach Tony Robbins

In a world that’s changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.
 Mark Zuckerberg

If things are not failing, you are not innovating enough.
 Elon Musk

7 Epigraphs That Start Novels Off Right


Share using facebook
Share using twitter
Share using email

Nothing sets the tone of a novel quite like a great opening sentence — nothing, that is, except an equally great epigraph. Not every book begins with a quotation or excerpt from another work, but those that do offer a sense of what you’re about to read; for that reason, they often resonate even more after you finish the novel they introduce. Even so, these seven exemplars of the genre are compelling no matter when you read them.


“THE SUN ALSO RISES” BY ERNEST HEMINGWAY

You are all a lost generation.
 Gertrude Stein

Ernest Hemingway is a luminary of the “Lost Generation,” but he didn’t actually coin the phrase. That honor belongs to his mentor, Gertrude Stein, whom he quoted at the beginning of The Sun Also Rises — a vital text of that movement, which represents those born at the turn of the 20th century who came of age during World War I and found themselves disenchanted in its aftermath. In literary terms, it refers specifically to the likes of Hemingway, Stein, and American expatriate writers who traveled abroad to find themselves — and write some of the 20th century’s defining works.

“FRANKENSTEIN” BY MARY SHELLEY

Did I request thee, Maker, from my clay
To mould me Man, did I solicit thee
From darkness to promote me?
 John Milton, “Paradise Lost, X, 743-45”

Whether you call the reanimated corpse at the center of Mary Shelley’s timeless classic Frankenstein or Frankenstein’s Monster, neither name is entirely accurate: the former because Frankenstein is the man who made him, the latter because he isn’t truly a monster. More than anything, he’s a victim — a being created in a lab to deny the laws of physics who, like Adam in this quote from John Milton’s epic poem, didn’t ask for any of this. It’s relatable to anyone who’s ever felt as though their circumstances were thrust upon them and they had no say in the matter — which is to say, everyone.

“HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS” BY J.K. ROWLING

Death is but crossing the world, as friends do the seas; they live in one another still. For they must needs be present, that love and live in that which is omnipresent. In this divine glass, they see face to face; and their converse is free, as well as pure. This is the comfort of friends, that though they may be said to die, yet their friendship and society are, in the best sense, ever present, because immortal.
 William Penn, “More Fruits of Solitude”

Only one book in the Harry Potter series begins with an epigraph: The Deathly Hallows, which concludes J.K. Rowling’s seven-part epic. It does so in part by saying goodbye to many more characters than you’d expect of a fantasy series aimed at children, with several fan favorites meeting devastating ends. Beyond that, there’s also the villain Voldemort’s obsession with achieving immortality no matter the cost, and the hero Harry’s growing realization that to confront his arch rival is also quite literally to confront death. With all that in mind, it would have been strange not to open the book with Penn’s ruminations on mortality, especially as the epigraph is also about the comfort our friends bring us: Harry Potter is about many things, but few through-lines are as ever-present in its pages as the importance of friendship.

“THE LITTLE FRIEND” BY DONNA TARTT

The slenderest knowledge that may be attained of the highest things is more desirable than the most certain knowledge attained of lesser things.
 Saint Thomas Aquinas, “Summa Theologica”

The Little Friend isn’t as acclaimed as Donna Tartt’s other two novels, The Secret History and The Goldfinch, but her overlooked sophomore effort is essential reading for admirers of the Pulitzer Prize–winning author. A kind of mystery following a little girl coming of age in 1970s Mississippi, the book is concerned with nothing if not knowledge — especially because its central question is who murdered the protagonist’s older brother years before.

“ANSWERED PRAYERS” BY TRUMAN CAPOTE

More tears are shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones.
 Teresa of Ávila

Speaking of lesser-known works from revered authors, Truman Capote’s unfinished novel went so far as to take its title from this musing attributed to Teresa of Ávila. The missing chapters of Answered Prayers have been the subject of much speculation since the book was published posthumously in 1986; one confidante claims to have read them in the years before Capote’s death, and that he gave her the key to a safe-deposit box supposedly containing them, though no such container was ever found. The book’s own editor’s note suggests that Capote may have destroyed those chapters himself.

In its own way, this behind-the-scenes intrigue touches on the epigraph’s meaning: If the book’s existence may itself be thought of as a kind of answered prayer, the effort to make it whole shows that getting what we want — or think we want — rarely solves our problems the way we expect it to.

“THE INFORMERS” BY BRET EASTON ELLIS

One night I was sitting on the bed in my hotel room on Bunker Hill, down in the very middle of Los Angeles. It was an important night in my life, because I had to make a decision about the hotel. Either I paid up or I got out. That was what the note said, the note the landlady had put under my door. A great problem, deserving acute attention. I solved it by turning out the lights and going to bed.
 John Fante, Ask the Dust

Not everyone confronts their problems head-on — especially in the books of Bret Easton Ellis. The opening paragraph of John Fante’s masterwork could have served as the epigraph of several of Ellis’ books, but the fact that he chose it for The Informers is no accident. The collection of short stories is set in Los Angeles, as is Fante’s Ask the Dust (and, for that matter, most of both writers’ bodies of work), and its criss-crossing characters are beset with an ennui that makes them even less proactive than Arturo Bandini, Fante’s tragicomic hero.

“TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD” BY HARPER LEE

Lawyers, I suppose, were children once.
– Charles Lamb

You wouldn’t think that a single quote could touch upon the perspectives of both Atticus and Scout Finch, but the epigraph that opens To Kill a Mockingbird does just that. Harper Lee’s all-timer of a novel is required reading for a reason, offering readers of all ages a profound lesson on how to treat those who are different from us and, really, how to look at the world. Too many of us forget what it was like to be a kid, whether by choice or through the simple passage of time, and few books remind us of that age of wonderment quite like To Kill a Mockingbird.

Why Alaska and the Arctic are Critical


Why Alaska and the Arctic are Critical to the National Security of the United States

https://www.armyupress.army.mil/Journals/Military-Review/English-Edition-Archives/January-February-2018/Why-Alaska-and-the-Arctic-are-Critical-to-the-National-Security-of-the-United-States/

Sir David Attenborough – Quotes


Sir David Attenborough’s career as a broadcaster and natural historian has spanned almost 70 years, from the early days of black-and-white film to the age of HD and 3D imagery. His work as a writer and presenter with the BBC Natural History Unit has taken him all over the world, and made him one of the most well-traveled people on the planet. For his groundbreaking 1979 series Life on Earth, he traveled 1.5 million miles, and since then, he has made nine more Life series of similar scope.

Attenborough is considered one of the most trusted voices in his home country of Britain, and his unique narrative style is instantly recognizable, whether he’s talking about penguins or narrating one of Adele’s music videos. In 2016, Prince William paid tribute to Sir Attenborough, saying, “He’s a national treasure, and it is very fitting that he is having his 90th birthday only a few weeks after the Queen. They are two incredible national treasures who have done so much over the years.” He is equally popular among the scientific community; at least 15 animals and plants — both living and extinct — have been named in his honor, including a Peruvian frog (Pristimantis attenboroughi) and a plesiosaur from the Early Jurassic called Attenborosaurus.

During the last two decades, Attenborough has become increasingly outspoken about the impact of human society on the natural world. His warnings are often stark and urgent, and his words have motivated generations to take up the cause, including young activists like Greta Thunberg, who thanked Attenborough for inspiring her. But while his recent documentaries have focused more heavily on the destruction of the environment, Attenborough’s passion for the natural world has never diminished. From his earliest works to the present day, his quotes about our planet still inspire the same sense of awe.

ON LIFE

There are some four million different kinds of animals and plants in the world. Four million different solutions to the problems of staying alive.
 “Life on Earth,” 1979

ON OUR UNIQUE PLANET

Our planet, the Earth, is, as far as we know, unique in the universe. It contains life. Even in its most barren stretches, there are animals. Around the equator, where those two essentials for life, sunshine and moisture, are most abundant, great forests grow. And here plants and animals proliferate in such numbers that we still have not even named all the different species.
 “The Living Planet,” 1984

ON ANTARCTICA

I am at the very center of the great white continent, Antarctica. The South Pole is about half a mile away. For a thousand miles in all directions, there is nothing but ice. And, in the whole of this continent, which is about one-and-a-half times the size of the United States and larger than Europe, there is a year-round population of no more than 800 people. This is the loneliest and coldest place on Earth, the place that is most hostile to life. And yet, in one or two places, it is astonishingly rich.
 “Life in the Freezer,” 1993

ON PLANTS

These trees and bushes and grasses around me are living organisms just like animals. And they have to face very much the same sort of problems as animals face throughout their lives if they’re to survive. They have to fight one another, they have to compete for mates, they have to invade new territories. But the reason that we’re seldom aware of these dramas is that plants of course live on a different time-scale.
 “The Private Life of Plants,” 1995

ON BIRDS

Birds were flying from continent to continent long before we were. They reached the coldest place on Earth, Antarctica, long before we did. They can survive in the hottest of deserts. Some can remain on the wing for years at a time. They can girdle the globe.
 “The Life of Birds,” 1998

ON INVERTEBRATES

If we and the rest of the backboned animals were to disappear overnight, the rest of the world would get on pretty well. But if [the invertebrates] were to disappear, the land’s ecosystems would collapse.
 “Life in the Undergrowth,” 2005

ON HUMANITY

A hundred years ago, there were one-and-a-half billion people on Earth. Now, over six billion crowd our fragile planet. But even so, there are still places barely touched by humanity.
 “Planet Earth,” 2006

ON SURVIVAL

Our planet may be home to 30 million different kinds of animals and plants, each individual locked in its own lifelong fight for survival. Everywhere you look, on land or in the ocean, there are extraordinary examples of the lengths living things go to stay alive.
 “Life,” 2009

ON BLUE WHALES

A blue whale, 30 meters long and weighing over 200 tonnes. It’s far bigger than even the biggest dinosaur. Its tongue weighs as much as an elephant, its heart is the size of a car, and some of its blood vessels are so wide you could swim down them. Its tail alone is the width of a small aircraft’s wings.
 “Blue Planet,” 2001

ON THE ANNUAL SPAWNING OF THE CHRISTMAS ISLAND RED CRAB

The savage, rocky shores of Christmas Island, 200 miles south of Java, in the Indian Ocean. It’s November, the moon is in its third quarter, and the sun is just setting. And in a few hours from now, on this very shore, a thousand million lives will be launched.
 “The Trials of Life,” 1990

ON EXPERIENCE

Experience has taught me how amazingly big and unpredictable the natural world is. When you’re young, you think you know it all about the natural world — “Yawn, yawn, everyone knows about that.” But in fact we only know a tiny proportion about the complexity of the natural world. Wherever you look, there are still things we don’t know about and don’t understand, as recent discoveries about, say, the behaviors of pufferfish and peacock spiders prove. There are always new things to find out if you go looking for them. They will last me out!
– Interview with “The Independent,” two days before his 90th birthday

ON THE FUTURE

With or without us, the wild will return … It seems that, however grave our mistakes, nature will be able to overcome them, given the chance.
– “A Life on Our Planet: My Witness Statement and a Vision for the Future,” 2020

Seasoned Nuts Quotable


“Above all, don’t lie to yourself. The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others. And having no respect he ceases to love.” — Fyodor Dostoevsky

Convivial


WORD OF THE DAY
Convivial
kən-VIV-ee-əl
Part of speech: adjective
Origin: Latin, mid-17th century
1

(Of an atmosphere or event) friendly, lively, and enjoyable; (of a person) cheerful and friendly; jovial

Examples of Convivial in a sentence

“The housewarming party was convivial and welcoming.”

“Thérèse was a charming, convivial dinner host — and a good cook, too.”

15 quotes to inspire self-love


15 Quotes to Inspire Self-Love

June 16, 2021

Share using facebook
Share using twitter
Share using email

Like love for others, self-love can take many forms, from simple friendship with oneself to purposeful acts of self-care or self-protection. While specific routines and approaches may trend on and off, the concept of self-love is ancient. Religious and cultural leaders, popular artists, poets, and others around the world have long heralded the inherent lovableness and divinity of human beings.

Self-love is not the same as selfishness or ignorance of others’ needs; seeing our own inherent worth can sometimes help us remember the worth of others. Some people practice loving self-care from a practical and altruistic place in order to  better serve others, as in the oft-referenced airplane emergency directions to put your own oxygen mask on first. This mindset centers the understanding that if we ourselves are depleted, it is harder to be  generous with  others.

At the most basic level, we must learn to understand and meet our own needs in order to survive, and, certainly, if we hope to thrive and enjoy our lives to the fullest. Self-love can also be a simple appreciation of the traits that make us uniquely ourselves. For communities who have experienced oppression, self-love may even be a revolutionary choice.

Whatever form it takes, loving and caring for yourself is a positive force in the world. Here are 15 quotes that describe the myriad forms and special power of self-love.

At this moment, you are seamlessly flowing with the cosmos. There is no difference between your breathing and the breathing of the rainforest, between your bloodstream and the world’s rivers, between your bones and the chalk cliffs of Dover.
— Deepak Chopra

I’m in love with my future, can’t wait to meet her…
I’m in love but not with anybody else; just wanna’ get to know myself.
I know, supposedly, I’m lonely now,
know I’m supposed to be unhappy without someone
but aren’t I someone?
— “My Future,” Billie Eilish (written by Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell)

Caring for myself is not self-indulgence; it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.
— Audrey Lorde

It’s about waking up in the morning and saying that I’m worthy of love, belonging, and joy. It’s about engaging with the world from a place of worthiness.
— Brené Brown

You do not have to be good.
You do not have to walk on your knees for a hundred miles through the desert, repenting.
You only have to let the soft animal of your body love what it loves.
— Mary Oliver

The most wonderful thing about Tiggers is that I’m the only one.
— A.A. Milne

I figured out I gotta be my own type… It’s a me, myself kinda attitude.
‘Cause I’m my own soulmate, I know how to love me.
— “Soulmate,” Lizzo (written by Lizzo, Sean Douglas, and Warren Felder)

May I be happy, may I be well.
May I be kind toward my suffering.
May I cultivate more kindness within my heart.
May I cultivate more peace within my heart.
— Traditional Buddhist Metta (loving kindness meditation)

The sky could fall down, the wind could cry now,
the strong in me, I still smile.
I love myself.
— “i,” Kendrick Lamar (written by Ernie Isley, O’Kelly Isley, Rudolph Isley, Ronald Isley, Marvin Isley, Christopher Jasper, Kendrick Lamar, and Rahki)

No matter what troubles have befallen you or what difficulties you have caused yourself or others, with love for yourself you can change, grow, make amends, and learn… Real love does not encourage you to ignore your problems or deny your mistakes and imperfections. You see them clearly and still opt to love.
— Sharon Salzberg

Don’t you know that you yourselves are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in your midst?
— St. Paul, the Bible

All of the rocky and metallic material we stand on, the iron in our blood, the calcium in our teeth, the carbon in our genes were produced billions of years ago in the interior of a red giant star. We are made of star-stuff.
— Carl Sagan

The way to get kindness with(in) yourself is spending time being nice to yourself, spending time getting to know and (dare I say it!) getting to love yourself… Loving yourself helps you love other people.
— Jeffrey Marsh, American writer, activist, and social media personality

No matter what they take from me, they can’t take away my dignity
because the greatest love of all is happening to me.
I found the greatest love of all inside of me…
Learning to love yourself, it is the greatest love of all.
— “Greatest Love of All,” Whitney Houston (written by Michael Masser and Linda Creed)

I am an expression of the divine, just like a peach is, just like a fish is… We realize that we are as ourselves unlimited and our experiences valid. It is for the rest of the world to recognize this, if they choose.
— Alice Walker

Did you know…


Did you know…

… that today is the birthday of Kate Beckinsale (1973), Sandra Bullock (1964), and Helen Mirren (1946). Grab some popcorn and watch your favorite movie with a female lead!

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Each of us has been put on earth with the ability to do something well. We cheat ourselves and the world if we don’t use that ability as best we can.”

— Gracie Allen

Pulchritudinous


WORD OF THE DAY
Pulchritudinouspəl-krə-TOOD-ən-əsPart of speech: adjectiveOrigin: English, 15th century
1Beautiful.
 
Examples of Pulchritudinous in a sentence “Her pulchritudinous looks charmed everyone at the table.” “The wedding planner provided lush, pulchritudinous flower arrangements.”