Has USA lost War against WMD by #ChineseVirus?=


Using W.M.D. = WASHING HANDS, MASKING FACE, SOCIAL DISTANCING HAVEN’T WORKED. SO HAVE THE HCQ and all other so-called cures and Immunity builders.

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SCIENCECORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Coronavirus in the U.S.: Where cases are growing and declining

UPDATED NOV. 6, 2020, 9:38 A.M. E.T.

New daily confirmed coronavirus cases in the U.S.

9,698,098 total cases

235,331 reported deaths50,000100,000Newcases7-day average121,504March 1Last seven days

While uncertainty defined the days after the U.S. presidential election, the autumn surge in coronavirus cases has remained consistent. On November 4, the nation recorded 100,000 new cases in a single day, the first time the nation has hit that peak since the pandemic began in January. New daily records seem bound to continue, as case rates are rising rapidly in more than 40 states and territories. While Midwest and Mountain West states—such as the Dakotas, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Montana, Wyoming, and Iowa—are struggling mightily, the new spikes are everywhere. * COVID-19 deaths are steadily climbing above 1,000 per day, after months of remaining relatively flat thanks to improvements in medicine and therapy. This uptick is likely a consequence of hospitals being overrun. As of early November, at least three of every four ICU beds are occupied in 24 states.

This autumn bout will likely be harder to manage, as the pestilence flourishes in rural areas where access to emergency care has been declining for years. Rural areas have higher rates of the underlying conditions and behaviors—smoking, high blood pressure, and obesity—that tend to lead to worse outcomes with COVID-19. At the current pace, America could reach 300,000 deaths before the new year. The pandemic is also spiking overseas.

The map below shows the regions where cases and deaths are either decreasing or increasing the most, based on the last seven days compared to the previous week.Cases DeathsWeekly change Per capita Total-6-4-20246Change in cases per 10,000, since one week agoFewer casesMore casesNo Data

Though the lockdowns issued by many states and territories began easing in mid-April, it took weeks for new surges to appear. Death rates, which lag at least a month behind case counts, are also still rising in approximately 30 states and territories. On July 21, the U.S. recorded more than a thousand deaths for the first time since early June.

Hard hit areas such as New York City and Boston witnessed the normal surge and dissipation that accompanies the first wave of a pandemic. But case rates elsewhere neither grew nor abated, giving off the impression of control. Unfortunately when states and territories began to reopen in May, the virus’s stealthy spread flourished once more. (See the spread of the coronavirus across the globe.)

Where coronavirus cases and deaths are changing the most

Assuming that tests are being deployed thoroughly, a regional growth in coronavirus cases signals a breakdown in one of those strategies, while a decrease suggests the virus is being controlled. Here are the top 10 states and territories that have experienced the greatest change—an increase or a decrease—in coronavirus cases and deaths per capita over the last seven days from the previous seven days.Cases DeathsLargest increase Largest decrease 

Stay-at-home order

7-day average Increased or  decreased in the previous week

North Dakota

8,707 new cases this week, up from 6,078 the previous week5001,0001,5001,536March 1Last seven days

Iowa

19,563 new cases this week, up from 10,990 the previous week2,0004,0005,480March 1Last seven days

Nebraska

9,862 new cases this week, up from 6,865 the previous week1,0002,0002,124March 1Last seven days

Minnesota

22,555 new cases this week, up from 14,159 the previous week1,0002,0003,0003,942March 1Last seven days

Illinois

53,906 new cases this week, up from 36,502 the previous week5,0009,991March 1Last seven days

State-by-state: Trends in coronavirus cases

More detailed state information about where coronavirus cases or deaths are increasing, decreasing, or staying steady where you live. Stay-at-home order  7-day average Increased or  decreased in the past weekAlabamaAlaskaArizonaArkansasCaliforniaColoradoConnecticutDelawareDistrict of ColumbiaFloridaGeorgiaHawaiiIdahoIllinoisIndianaIowaKansasKentuckyLouisianaMaineMarylandMassachusettsMichiganMinnesotaMississippiMissouriMontanaNebraskaNevadaNew HampshireNew JerseyNew MexicoNew YorkNorth CarolinaNorth DakotaOhioOklahomaOregonPennsylvaniaPuerto RicoRhode IslandSouth CarolinaSouth DakotaTennesseeTexasUtahVermontVirginiaWashingtonWest VirginiaWisconsinWyoming 

Alabama

Cases decreased this week compared to the previous week, with 10,009 new cases in the last seven days, down from 12,085 the week before.

199,158 total cases (#16 of 53 regions)

409.4 cases per 10,000 people (#8)

Deaths increased this week compared to the previous week, with 112 new deaths in the last seven days, up from 71 the week before.

3,026 reported deaths (#23)

62.2 deaths per 100,000 people (#23)

1.5 percent death rate (#35)April 41,0002,0003,0003,852March 1Last seven days

Rank, CasesCasesCases per 10,000DeathsDeaths per 100,000
Autauga242,2304043156.2
Baldwin77,0973417737
Barbour391,080418.9934.9
Bibb46907402.61566.6
Blount252,222385.52543.4
Bullock55661638.517164.2
Butler411,037517.941204.7
Calhoun95,039437.86657.3
Chambers341,461431.948141.9
Cherokee48831321.41558
Chilton281,983451.43375.1
Choctaw64399305.21291.8
Clarke361,422583.11873.8
Clay50799597.21397.2
Cleburne586144111066.9
Coffee311,920374.41121.4
Colbert232,390438.63258.7
Conecuh59592473.113103.9
Coosa66230211.9327.6
Covington321,912511.93285.7
Crenshaw56634457.330216.4
Cullman193,001364.62631.6
Dale291,982402.452105.6
Dallas301,952487.62767.5
DeKalb143,790532.33143.5
Elmore153,379416.15972.6
Escambia331,8034833183
Etowah104,7454615755.4
Fayette57631380.51590.4
Franklin262,219703.532101.5
Geneva431,003378.6830.2
Greene65354420.117201.8
Hale49817548.830201.5
Henry52766447.3635
Houston134,408422.43533.5
Jackson222,422464.92140.3
Jefferson125,159381.339159.3
Lamar62541388.3750.2
Lauderdale212,835306.24548.6
Lawrence44977294.534102.5
Lee86,812427.76540.8
Limestone173,231347.23638.7
Lowndes5373972229283.3
Macon60590309.621110.2
Madison510,078281.910228.5
Marengo401,077551.224122.8
Marion381,188396.531103.5
Marshall114,727496.85355.7
Mobile217,591424.232478.1
Monroe54683317.51046.5
Montgomery410,937481.921594.7
Morgan124,702394.73932.7
Perry58614647.3663.3
Pickens45972478.91888.7
Pike371,410422.11441.9
Randolph47879389.41670.9
Russell272,012345.635.2
Shelby68,017379.57033.1
St. Clair163,378386.95158.4
Sumter63494380.421161.7
Talladega202,8923593948.4
Tallapoosa351,443355.187214.1
Tuscaloosa310,976532.314570.3
Walker183,08347895147.3
Washington51794477.11272.1
Wilcox61585541.212111
Winston421,0104231354.5

See more

Data as of Nov. 6, 2020, 9:38 A.M. E.T.

NGM Staff, Paul Buffa.

Source: The New York Times, U.S. Census Bureau. Counts for Alameda County include cases and deaths from Berkeley and the Grand Princess cruise ship and counts for Douglas County include cases brought to the state from the Diamond Princess cruise ship.

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