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Memory involves the whole body. It’s how the self defies amnesia | Psyche Ideas


6 money laundering reforms that experts say need to happen right now – ICIJ


Five Reasons Why Stoicism Matters Today


5. It’s a philosophy for leadership. Stoicism teaches us that, before we try to control events, we have to control ourselves first. Our attempts to exert influence on the world are subject to chance, disappointment, and failure–but control of the self is the only kind that can succeed 100% of the time. From emperor Marcus Aurelius on, leaders have found that a Stoic attitude earns them respect in the face of failure, and guards against arrogance in the face of success. Stoicism has an appeal for anyone who faces uncertainty–that is, for all of us. But leaders are especially subject to risk and flux, so it’s not surprising that many of them find a Stoic attitude crucial to their mental health. We mentioned Barack Obama’s Stoic demeanor above–and there’s some more evidence for it in his recent interview with Michael Lewis. “I’m trying to pare down decisions,” he told Lewis. “I don’t want to make decisions about what I’m eating or wearing. Because I have too many other decisions to make…You need to routinize yourself. You can’t be going through the day distracted by trivia.” Whatever your opinion of Obama’s politics, that’s classic Stoicism–trying to draw lines between the essential and the inessential at every level of life. Of course, Stoicism doesn’t guarantee results. One of Bill Clinton’s favorite books was Marcus Aurelius’s Meditations–and he’s no one’s idea of a Stoic.  Cato the Younger subscribed to this philosophy from his young adulthood to his death, but he was also prone to violent outbursts of anger, obstinate pride, and occasional drunkenness. Yet in his most courageous moments–when he faced down the army of Julius Caesar and certain defeat without blinking–Cato lived out the Stoic ideal. The Stoics taught that we fail far more often than we succeed, that to be human is to be fearful, selfish, and angry far more often than we’d like. But they also taught a realistic way to be more. The more we practice Stoic qualities in good times, the more likely that we’ll find them in ourselves when they’re most needed. = Post by: Jimmy Soni and Rob Goodman, authors of Rome’s Last Citizen: The Life and Legacy of Cato, Mortal Enemy of Caesar

Five Reasons Why Stoicism Matters Today

Interesting day predicted ahead…


[ INSPIRED ACTION ]
Focus on inspiration and the action steps will flow effortlessly.

Inspired action happens when you are working in the flow of what it is you are wishing to create. You will naturally know what needs to happen next, because everything is working in harmony. When you are not in touch with inspiration, you block the flow and begin to push against the thing you are trying to create. This card comes to you today because you have a masterpiece within you waiting to be birthed out into the world. Your life, as a whole, is one big masterpiece and you are the creator. When you create through inspiration, you align naturally with the powerful workings of the universal mind.

It is time to take a step back, breathe, and start over. This time, get in touch with the inspiration from within you. Remind yourself of the why you wanted to do this in the first place. The why you want to do something is the inspiration. The inspiration is the feeling of excitement and passion combined. It is not a feeling of dread, force, or trying too hard. It is a feeling of flowing effortlessly with what you are doing because you love to do it! Spend a day focusing on the pure essence of what you are wanting to create. Surround yourself with all of the components that come together to create a feeling of excitement and passion. Get back in touch with the inspiration behind what you are doing, and you will begin to flow easily toward the final outcome. Enjoy the process of creating, and the steps to get there will happen so naturally you will forget that you are actually taking action. You will simply be in the pure joy of creating.

Mohan Bhagwat: India’s reaction to aggression left China rattled | India News – Times of India


[ INSPIRED ACTION ]
Focus on inspiration and the action steps will flow effortlessly.

Inspired action happens when you are working in the flow of what it is you are wishing to create. You will naturally know what needs to happen next, because everything is working in harmony. When you are not in touch with inspiration, you block the flow and begin to push against the thing you are trying to create. This card comes to you today because you have a masterpiece within you waiting to be birthed out into the world. Your life, as a whole, is one big masterpiece and you are the creator. When you create through inspiration, you align naturally with the powerful workings of the universal mind.

It is time to take a step back, breathe, and start over. This time, get in touch with the inspiration from within you. Remind yourself of the why you wanted to do this in the first place. The why you want to do something is the inspiration. The inspiration is the feeling of excitement and passion combined. It is not a feeling of dread, force, or trying too hard. It is a feeling of flowing effortlessly with what you are doing because you love to do it! Spend a day focusing on the pure essence of what you are wanting to create. Surround yourself with all of the components that come together to create a feeling of excitement and passion. Get back in touch with the inspiration behind what you are doing, and you will begin to flow easily toward the final outcome. Enjoy the process of creating, and the steps to get there will happen so naturally you will forget that you are actually taking action. You will simply be in the pure joy of creating.

great commandments


You shall love your neighbor.
You shall take only that which is given.
You shall be grateful for any kindness given to you.
You shall take responsibility for your actions.
You shall seek knowledge, for knowledge brings you closer to god.
You shall not act upon your darkest desires, but instead cleanse them from your being.
You shall not forge the word of god.
You shall ask only fair prices for what you produce.
You shall not forge false evidence or lies against another.
You shall not cause the destruction of that which isn’t yours.

Who Is Seneca? Inside The Mind of The World’s Most Interesting Stoic


3 Exercises & Lessons From Seneca 1. Find an Anchor Seneca, in his letters to Lucilius, urges him to choose a role model to provide a standard to live by. This is of course idea that is not unique to Stoicism by any means but Seneca succinctly puts why it is a necessary step in our pursuit of the good life. The person of our choosing can provide us with principles that can help us navigate even the most difficult and treacherous circumstances as well as standards against which we can judge our behavior on a day-to-day basis. As Seneca wrote, “So choose yourself a Cato–or, if Cato seems too severe for you, a Laelius, a man whose character is not quite so strict. Choose someone whose way of life as well as words, and whose very face as mirroring the character that lies behind it, have won your approval. Be always pointing him out to yourself either as your guardian or as your model. There is a need, in my view, for someone as a standard against which our characters can measure themselves. Without a ruler to do it against you won’t make crooked straight.” 2. Never Be a Slave of Your Wealth Let’s return to the paradox about philosophy and riches. A way to think about Seneca’s wealth as discussed by Nassim Taleb is the following: Seneca only wanted the upside of wealth but was always ready to use it and never dependent on it. He was a master of it, not its slave. All the upside, none of the downside. We need to constantly reexamine if we are so trapped by the gifts of good fortune that we are scared to lose and therefore turning it into our master. As Seneca wrote in On The Happy Life discussing his riches: “For the wise man does not consider himself unworthy of any gifts from Fortune’s hands: he does not love wealth but he would rather have it; he does not admit into his heart but into his home; and what wealth is his he does not reject but keeps, wishing it to supply greater scope for him to practice his virtue.” As he summed up his attitude of being a master and not a slave of good fortune: “For the wise man regards wealth as a slave, the fool as a master.” 3. Fight Your Ego Seneca understood well how our ego can impede us from learning and progress. In today’s culture of inflating everyone’s self-esteem we get used to only hearing praise. Little by little we start buying it more and more. To paraphrase what a journalist wrote about tyrannical leaders, when you keep hearing that you are a superman, you start to believe it. Seneca warned Lucilius against such indulgence: “The chief obstacle is that we are quick to be satisfied with ourselves. If we find someone to call us good men, cautious and principled, we acknowledge him. We are not content with a moderate eulogy, but accept as our due whatever flattery has shamelessly heaped upon us. We agree with those who call us best and wisest, although we know they often utter many falsehoods: we indulge ourselves so greatly that we want to be praised for a virtue which is the opposite of our behavior. A man hears himself called ‘most merciful’ while he is inflicting torture.. So it follows that we don’t want to change because we believe we are already excellent.” Seneca Quotes “Think your way through difficulties: harsh conditions can be softened, restricted ones can be widened, and heavy ones can weigh less on those who know how to bear them.” “Let all your activity be directed to some object, let it have some end in view.” “Often a very old man has no other proof of his long life than his age.” “We say that nothing happens to the wise man against his expectation.” “Believe me it is better to understand the balance-sheet of one’s own life than of the corn trade.” “We are not given a short life but we make it short, and we are not Ill-supplied but wasteful of it.” *** P.S. The bestselling authors of The Daily Stoic, Ryan Holiday and Stephen Hanselman, have teamed up again in their new book Lives of the Stoics: The Art of Living From Zeno To Marcus. Along with presenting the fascinating lives of all the well-known and not so well-known Stoics, Lives of the Stoics distills timeless and immediately applicable lessons about happiness, success, resilience, and virtue. The book is available for pre-order and is set to release on September 29!

Who Is Seneca? Inside The Mind of The World’s Most Interesting Stoic

This is not the end. Apocalyptic comfort from ancient Iran | Psyche Ideas


Crested cacti show medicine the possibility of adapting to cancer | Aeon Essays


Conurbation – W.O.t.d.


kah-nər-BEY-shən
Part of speech: nounOrigin: 
Latin, early 20th century
WORD OF THE DAY
1An extended urban area, typically consisting of several towns merging with the suburbs of one or more cities.
 
Examples of Conurbation in a sentence “Therese lived in the conurbation of New York City, but she called herself a Long Islander.” “I love visiting hubs of fast-paced urban conurbation.”

JAMES CLEAR – MY FAV NEWSLETTER


3-2-1 ThursdayNote: You are receiving this email because you subscribed to my weekly 3-2-1 newsletter. Every Thursday, I share 3 ideas from me, 2 quotes from others, and 1 question for you to ponder. Occasionally, I also send out long-form articles on habits and self-improvement.

3 ideas, 2 quotes, 1 question (October 22, 2020)

“The most wisdom per word of any newsletter on the web.”

Read this on JamesClear.com

Happy 3-2-1 Thursday,

Here are 3 short ideas from me, 2 quotes from others, and 1 question to ponder this week.

3 IDEAS FROM ME

I.

“Be radically proactive about any behavior that pays off in 10 years.”

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II.

“To simplify before you understand the details is ignorance.

To simplify after you understand the details is genius.”

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III.

“A 5-step process for nearly anything:

1) Explore widely. Find out what is possible.

2) Test cheaply. Run small, quick experiments. Sample things.

3) Edit ruthlessly. Focus on the best. Cut everything else.

4) Repeat what works. Don’t quit on a good idea.

5) Return to 1.”

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2 QUOTES FROM OTHERS

I.

Lawyer and activist Vernon Jordan on the collaborative nature of life:

“You are where you are today because you stand on somebody’s shoulders. And wherever you are heading, you cannot get there by yourself. If you stand on the shoulders of others, you have a reciprocal responsibility to live your life so that others may stand on your shoulders. It’s the quid pro quo of life. We exist temporarily through what we take, but we live forever through what we give.”

Source: 2002 speech at Howard University



II.

A list of 10 principles from an early internal memo at Nike, long before the company grew into a global brand. This list is rumored to have been written in 1977 by the first head of marketing, Rob Strasser, and was shared decades later by lead designer Markus Kittner.

“1. Our business is change.

2. We’re on offense. All the time.

3. Perfect results count — not a perfect process. Break the rules: fight the law.

4. This is as much about battle as about business.

5. Assume nothing. Make sure people keep their promises. Push yourselves push others. Stretch the possible.

6. Live off the land.

7. Your job isn’t done until the job is done.

8. Dangers:

– Bureaucracy

– Personal ambition

– Energy takers vs. energy givers

– Knowing our weaknesses

– Don’t get too many things on the platter

9. It won’t be pretty.

10. If we do the right things we’ll make money damn near automatic.”

Source: Principles – For Collective Understanding, Focus and Orchestration (Note: Other employees claim Nike founder Phil Knight wrote the list.)

1 QUESTION FOR YOU

What is the little bit of extra work that has huge upside?

If you enjoyed that, please share with others.

Share this newsletter on TwitterFacebookLinkedInWhatsApp, or via email.

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Until next week,

James Clear
Author of the million-copy bestseller, Atomic Habits
Creator of the Habit Journal

P.S. Another wooden ball.

P.P.S. Hat tip to Mckay Wrigley for pushing the Nike principles across my feed.

Popular vs. good – Seth godin’s newsletter


Popular vs. good

They’re not the same.

We often strive to have both, but that’s unlikely. The price of having one almost certainly involves losing the other.  We often end up compromising something to get both and fail.

Better to have one than neither.

did you know….


Did you know…

… that today is Microwave Introduction Day? The microwave oven, for home use, was introduced by the Tappan Company on this day in 1955. The Raytheon Company had introduced microwave ovens in 1947, but they were as large as a refrigerator and too expensive for home use so, at Raytheon’s request, Tappan worked on reducing the size and cost. Today, over 90% of homes in America use microwave ovens.

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak. Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.”

— Sir Winston Churchill