Top 10 Mind Blowing Facts About Majestic Mountains – Listverse


Top 10 Mind Blowing Facts About Majestic Mountains

Forget Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics: try being Epicurean | Aeon Essays


BRAINPICKINGS.ORG NEWSLETTER – I LIKE


This is the weekly email digest of the daily online journal Brain Pickings by Maria Popova. If you missed last week’s edition — Bruce Lee on death and the key to being an artist of life, a Japanese illustrated serenade to change, Nobel laureate Louise Glück’s love poem to life — you can catch up right here; if you missed the anniversary edition of essential life-learnings from 14 years of Brain Pickings, that is here. And if you find any value and joy in my labor of love, please consider supporting it with a donation – I spend innumerable hours and tremendous resources on it each week, as I have been for fourteen years, and every little bit of support helps enormously. If you already donate: THANK YOU.

The Science of How Alive You Really Are: Alan Turing, Trees, and the Wonder of Life

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When the young Alan Turing (June 23, 1912–June 7, 1954) lost the love of his life, Christopher, to a bacterium contracted from cow’s milk, the grief-savaged future father of computing comforted his beloved’s grief-savaged mother by telling her that “the body provides something for the spirit to look after and use.” For the remainder of his life, he never ceased contemplating this binary code of body and spirit — a preoccupation fanned by this leveling loss in young adulthood, but ignited in childhood, by a book he had been given at age ten, a book he later told his own mother was what opened his mind and heart to science.alanturing_sherborne.jpg?resize=680%2C496

Alan Turing (far left) with classmates at Waterloo Station on the way to the school carriage. (Turing Digital Archive)

Published the year Turing was born, impishly described by its author as being “mostly about things that you do not learn in school,” Natural Wonders Every Child Should Know (public library) by Edwin Tinney Brewster invited young minds to step through the portal of science and contemplate not why life is — the domain of Sunday school theology — but what life is and how it came to be that way. Before there were scientists, it fell on the “natural philosophers” — men (for they were only men) typically trained in theology — to make sense of nature’s phenomena and processes. Born in the middle of the nineteenth century, only a generation after the person for whom the word scientist was coined — the polymathic Scottish mathematician Mary Somerville — Brewster devoted his life to aiding humanity’s great migration from the epoch of religion to the epoch of reality.4.jpg?resize=680%2C993

Light distribution on soap bubble from an 19th-century French science textbook. Available as a print and as a face mask.

The young Turing was captivated by Brewster’s playful analogies and his elegantly reasoned expositions of biological realities, worded so simply as to border on the poetic. How the chicken gets inside the egg, why we grow and grow old, what plants know — these wonders of life impressed the boy’s imagination with a lifelong passion: Unbeknownst to most, the father of modern computing devoted a substantial portion of his mind to an obscure branch of the biology of life known as morphogenesis — the process by which living organisms take their shape — which he illustrated in a series of hauntingly beautiful hand-drawn diagrams.turing_morphogenesis.jpg

Alan Turing’s little-known diagrams of morphogenesis.(Turing Digital Archive)

The book’s most captivating chapter, titled “How Much of Us Is Alive,” explores not the existential puzzlement of the question — that is best left to the poets and the artists of life — but the science, the staggering and counterintuitive reality, of aliveness. Brewster writes:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngHow much of a tree is alive? Certainly not the outer bark. That falls off in dry scales, or can be scraped off down to the white layers within, and the tree be none the worse. Certainly not the wood. One often comes across old trees that have lost limbs or been carelessly pruned, which are entirely decayed out on the inside, so that nothing is left but a thin shell next the bark. Yet these trees grow as vigorously as ever, and bear leaves and fruit like a solid tree. The bark is dead; and the wood is dead. Between the two is a thin layer, perhaps a quarter inch thru, which is alive. On one side, it is changing into dead wood. On the other side, it is changing into dead bark. The new wood is alive, and the new bark. Between them is something neither wood nor bark, but just living tree-stuff. The green leaves also are alive, and the green twigs, and the blossoms, and the growing buds. But at least half of every living tree is already dead; while the larger and longer lived a tree is, the smaller proportion of it is alive at one time.

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Art by Arthur Rackham for a rare edition of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales. (Available as a print.)

What is true of trees, Brewster observes, is true of us. (And not only because we see so much of ourselves in trees.) We exert vast portions of our anxious creative energy on devising antidotes to our elemental fear of death — some mightier than others — and yet much of the bodies we live in is not, strictly speaking, alive at all:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngOur hair and nails are not alive at all, and that our outer skin, the thin skin, that is, which we tear off when we bark our shins, is fully alive only on the inside. Our “bark” in fact, is very like a tree’s. Each has a soft, thin, living layer on the inside, which grows, hardens, dies, forms a water-tight layer over the rest of the body, cracks into scales, and drops off. Where one forms cork, the other forms horn. Indeed the cork stoppers of our bottles are made from nothing more than an especially thick corky bark of a certain kind of oak, like the especially thick and homy soles of all bare-footed savages and some bare-footed little boys.

With an eye to the biological fallacy at the heart of the famous biblical teaching that the life of every creature is its blood — refashioned in Bram Stoker’s iconic line from Dracula, “The blood is the life!” — Brewster counters:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngThe blood itself is dead. The watery part is just soup; water and salt and fat and jelly. The minute, coin-like, red blood corpuscles carry the oxygen of the air from the lungs all over the body. But there are similar oxygen-carriers, likewise dead, in bottles in the drug-stores. The corpuscles are dead cells alive once, and like the hard skin cells, a great deal more useful dead than alive.

After delineating how the same holds true of our teeth and the rest of our bones, Brewster draws out his analogy of cells as “living bricks” — with the caveat that even living cells are not fully alive, for the jelly of water and salt coursing through them is “just water and salt” — and adds:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngWe are, then, built of living bricks, but of living bricks set in dead mortar. We saw that the great trees, complex and long lived, have more wood and bark and other dead substances in them than the shrubs, herbs, and grass. These in turn are less alive than the lowly water plants and yeasts and molds which have no wood or bark at all. The same is true of animals. The jelly-fishes and infusoria have neither skin, hair, bones, nails, nor blood, and are pretty much all alive. So the more a creature’s life is worth, the less of it is alive.

The image of the “living bricks” particularly fascinated the young Turing, but it also struck him as somehow incomplete. Something was missing there, something didn’t add up to the mystery of consciousness, the wonder of what we are. In the mortar of his uncommon imagination, this incompleteness leavened the rise of modern computing. It is impossible to conceive of a Turing machine — that revolutionary mathematical progenitor of artificial intelligence — without brushing up against such elemental questions about the nature of aliveness, as Turing himself did when he gently threw his famous and formidable gauntlet of a test, asking whether a computer could ever “enjoy strawberries and cream, make someone fall in love with it, learn from experience, use words properly, be the subject of its own thought [or] do something really new.” The triumph of history is tracing the roots — ancient and alive — of our present condition in the world. The triumph of self-understanding is tracing the roots of the formative influences that make us who we are, that shape the people who shape the world.alanturing.jpg?resize=680%2C1013

Alan Turing as a young man

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Tenacity, the Art of Integration, and the Key to a Flexible Mind: Wisdom from the Life of Mary Somerville, for Whom the Word “Scientist” Was Coined

This essay is adapted from my book Figuring

A middle-aged Scottish mathematician rises ahead of the sun to spend a couple of hours with Newton before the day punctuates her thinking with the constant interruptions of mothering four children and managing a bustling household. “A man can always command his time under the plea of business,” Mary Somerville (December 26, 1780–November 28, 1872) would later write in her memoir; “a woman is not allowed any such excuse.”

Growing up, Somerville had spent the daylight hours painting and playing piano. When her parents realized that the household candle supply had thinned because Mary had been staying up at night to read Euclid, they promptly confiscated her candles. “Peg,” she recalled her father telling her mother, “we must put a stop to this, or we shall have Mary in a strait jacket one of these days.” Mary was undeterred. Having already committed the first six books of Euclid to memory, she spent her nights adventuring in mathematics in the bright private chamber of her mind.marysomerville.jpg?resize=680%2C827

Mary Somerville (Portrait by Thomas Phillips)

Despite her precocity and her early determination, it took Somerville half a lifetime to come abloom as a scientist — the spring and summer of her life passed with her genius laying restive beneath the frost of the era’s receptivity to the female mind. When Somerville was forty-six, she published her first scientific paper — a study of the magnetic properties of violet rays — which earned her praise from the inventor of the kaleidoscope, Sir David Brewster, as “the most extraordinary woman in Europe — a mathematician of the very first rank with all the gentleness of a woman.” Lord Brougham, the influential founder of the newly established Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge — with which Thoreau would take issue thirty-some years later by making a case for “the diffusion of useful ignorance,” comprising “knowledge useful in a higher sense” — was so impressed that he asked Somerville to translate a mathematical treatise by Pierre-Simon Laplace, “the Newton of France.” She took the project on, perhaps not fully aware how many years it would take to complete to her satisfaction, which would forever raise the common standard of excellence. All great works suffer from and are saved by a gladsome blindness to what they ultimately demand of their creators.

As the months unspooled into years, Somerville supported herself as a mathematics tutor to the children of the wealthy. One of her students was a little girl named Ada, daughter of the mathematically inclined baroness Annabella Milbanke and the only legitimate child of the sybarite poet Lord Byron — a little girl would would grow to be, thanks to Somerville’s introduction to Charles Babbage, the world’s first computer programmer.

When Somerville completed the project, she delivered something evocative of the Nobel Prize-winning Polish poet Wisława Szymborska’s wonderful notion of “that rare miracle when a translation stops being a translation and becomes… a second original” In The Mechanism of the Heavens, published in 1831 after years of work, Somerville hadn’t merely translated the math, but had expanded upon it and made it comprehensible to lay readers, popularizing Laplace’s esoteric ideas.ellenhardingbaker_solarsystemquilt1.jpg?resize=680%2C564

Solar System quilt by Ellen Harding Baker, begun in 1869 and completed in 1876 to teach women astronomy when they were barred from higher education in science. Available as a print and a face mask. (Smithsonian)

The book was an instant success, drawing attention from the titans of European science. John Herschel, whom Somerville considered the greatest scientist of their time and who was soon to coin the word photography, wrote her a warm letter she treasured for the rest of her days:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngDear Mrs. Somerville,

I have read your manuscript with the greatest pleasure, and will not hesitate to add, (because I am sure you will believe it sincere,) with the highest admiration. Go on thus, and you will leave a memorial of no common kind to posterity; and, what you will value far more than fame, you will have accomplished a most useful work. What a pity that La Place has not lived to see this illustration of his great work! You will only, I fear, give too strong a stimulus to the study of abstract science by this performance.

Somerville received another radiant fan letter from the famed novelist Maria Edgeworth, who wrote after devouring The Mechanism of the Heavens:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngI was long in the state of the boa constrictor after a full meal — and I am but just recovering the powers of motion. My mind was so distended by the magnitude, the immensity, of what you put into it!… I can only assure you that you have given me a great deal of pleasure; that you have enlarged my conception of the sublimity of the universe, beyond any ideas I had ever before been enabled to form.

Edgeworth was particularly taken with a “a beautiful sentence, as well as a sublime idea” from Somerville’s section on the propagation of sound waves:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngAt a very small height above the surface of the earth, the noise of the tempest ceases and the thunder is heard no more in those boundless regions, where the heavenly bodies accomplish their periods in eternal and sublime silence.

Years later, Edgeworth would write admiringly of Somerville that “while her head is up among the stars, her feet are firm upon the earth.”margaretnazon5.jpg?resize=680%2C338

Milky Way Starry Night by Native artist Margaret Nazon, part of her stunning series of astronomical beadwork.

In 1834, Somerville published her next major treatise, On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences — an elegant and erudite weaving together of the previously fragmented fields of astronomy, mathematics, physics, geology, and chemistry. It quickly became one of the scientific best sellers of the century and earned Somerville pathbreaking admission into the Royal Astronomical Society the following year, alongside the astronomer Caroline Herschel — the first women admitted as members of the venerable institution.

When Maria Mitchell — America’s first professional female astronomer and the first woman employed by the U.S. government for a professional task — traveled to Europe to meet the Old World’s greatest scientific luminaries, her Quaker shyness could barely contain the thrill of meeting her great hero. She spent three afternoons with Somerville in Scotland and left feeling that “no one can make the acquaintance of this remarkable woman without increased admiration for her.” In her journal, Mitchell described Somerville as “small, very,” with bright blue eyes and strong features, looking twenty years younger than her seventy-seven years, her diminished hearing the only giveaway of her age. “Mrs. Somerville talks with all the readiness and clearness of a man, but with no other masculine characteristic,” Mitchell wrote. “She is very gentle and womanly… chatty and sociable, without the least pretence, or the least coldness.”

Months after the publication of Somerville’s Connexion, the English polymath William Whewell — then master of Trinity College, where Newton had once been a fellow, and previously pivotal in making Somerville’s Laplace book a requirement of the university’s higher mathematics curriculum — wrote a laudatory review of her work, in which he coined the word scientist to refer to her. The commonly used term up to that point — “man of science” — clearly couldn’t apply to a woman, nor to what Whewell considered “the peculiar illumination” of the female mind: the ability to synthesize ideas and connect seemingly disparate disciplines into a clear lens on reality. Because he couldn’t call her a physicist, a geologist, or a chemist — she had written with deep knowledge of all these disciplines and more — Whewell unified them all into scientist. Some scholars have suggested that he coined the term a year earlier in his correspondence with Coleridge, but no clear evidence survives. What does survive is his incontrovertible regard for Somerville, which remains printed in plain sight — in his review, he praises her as a “person of true science.”mariaclaraeimmart-1.jpg?resize=680%2C509

Phases of Venus and Saturn by Maria Clara Eimmart, early 1700s. Available as a print.

Whewell saw the full dimension of Somerville’s singular genius as a connector and cross-pollinator of ideas across disciplines. “Everything is naturally related and interconnected,” Ada Lovelace would write a decade later. Maria Mitchell celebrated Somerville’s book as a masterwork containing “vast collections of facts in all branches of Physical Science, connected together by the delicate web of Mrs. Somerville’s own thought, showing an amount and variety of learning to be compared only to that of Humboldt.” But not everyone could see the genius of Somerville’s contribution to science in her synthesis and cross-pollination of information, effecting integrated wisdom greater than the sum total of bits of fact — a skill that becomes exponentially more valuable as the existing pool of knowledge swells. One obtuse malediction came from the Scottish philosopher Thomas Carlyle, who proclaimed that Somerville had never done anything original — a remark that the young sculptor Harriet Hosmer, herself a pioneer who paved the way for women in art, would tear to shreds. In a letter defending Somerville, she scoffed:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngTo the Carlyle mind, wherein women never played any conspicuous part, perhaps not, but no one, man or woman, ever possessed a clearer insight into complicated problems, or possessed a greater gift of rendering such problems clear to the mind of the student, one phase of originality, surely.

Somerville’s uncommon gift for seeing clearly into complexity came coupled with a deep distaste for dogma and the divisiveness of religion, the supreme blinders of lucidity. She recounted that as religious controversies swirled about her, she had “too high a regard for liberty of conscience to interfere with any one’s opinions.” She chose instead to live “on terms of sincere friendship and love with people who differed essentially” in their religious views. In her memoir, she encapsulated her philosophy of creed: “In all the books which I have written I have confined myself strictly and entirely to scientific subjects, although my religious opinions are very decided.”

Above all, Somerville possessed the defining mark of the great scientist and the great human being — the ability to hold one’s opinions with firm but unfisted fingers, remaining receptive to novel theories and willing to change one’s mind in light of new evidence. Her daughter recounted:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngIt is not uncommon to see persons who hold in youth opinions in advance of the age in which they live, but who at a certain period seem to crystallise, and lose the faculty of comprehending and accepting new ideas and theories; thus remaining at last as far behind, as they were once in advance of public opinion. Not so my mother, who was ever ready to hail joyfully any new idea or theory, and to give it honest attention, even if it were at variance with her former convictions. This quality she never lost, and it enabled her to sympathise with the younger generation of philosophers, as she had done with their predecessors, her own contemporaries.

Shortly after the publication of Somerville’s epoch-making book, the education reformer Elizabeth Peabody — who lived nearly a century, introduced Buddhist texts to America, and coined the term Transcendentalism — echoed the sentiment in her penetrating insight into middle age and the art of self-renewal.

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Audre Lorde on Poetry as an Instrument of Change and the Courage to Feel as an Antidote to Fear, a Portal to Power and Possibility, and a Fulcrum of Action

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This is the precarious balance of a thriving society: exposing the fissures and fractures of democracy, but then, rather than letting them gape into abysses of cynicism, sealing them with the magma of lucid idealism that names the alternatives and, in naming them, equips the entire supercontinent of culture with a cartography of action. “Words have more power than any one can guess; it is by words that the world’s great fight, now in these civilized times, is carried on,” Mary Shelley wrote as she championed the courage to speak up against injustice two hundred years ago, amid a world that commended itself for being civilized while barring people like Shelley from access to education, occupation, and myriad other civil dignities on account of their chromosomes, and barring people just a few shades darker than her from just about every human right on account of their melanin.

Shelley laced her novels with the exquisite prose-poetry of conviction, of vision that saw far beyond the horizons of her time and carried generations along the vector of that vision to shift the status quo into new frontiers of possibility. A century and a half after her, Audre Lorde (February 18, 1934–November 17, 1992)– another woman of uncommon courage of conviction and potency of vision — expanded another horizon of possibility by the power of her words and her meteoric life. Lorde was a poet in both the literal sense at its most stunning and the largest, Baldwinian sense — “The poets (by which I mean all artists),” wrote her contemporary and coworker in the kingdom of culture James Baldwin, “are finally the only people who know the truth about us. Soldiers don’t. Statesmen don’t… Only poets.” Lorde understood the power of poetry — the power of words mortised into meaning and tenoned into truth, truth about who we are and who we are capable of being — and she wielded that power to pivot an imperfect world closer to its highest potential.Nowhere does that potency of understanding live with more focused force than in her 1977 manifesto of an essay “Poetry Is Not a Luxury,” which opens The Selected Works of Audre Lorde (public library) — the excellent collection of poetry and prose, edited by Roxane Gay.

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Lorde, who resolved to live her life as a burst of light as she faced her death, and so lived it, writes:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngThe quality of light by which we scrutinize our lives has direct bearing upon the product which we live, and upon the changes which we hope to bring about through those lives. It is within this light that we form those ideas by which we pursue our magic and make it realized. This is poetry as illumination, for it is through poetry that we give name to those ideas which are — until the poem — nameless and formless, about to be birthed, but already felt. That distillation of experience from which true poetry springs births thought as dream births concept, as feeling births idea, as knowledge births (precedes) understanding.

With an eye to how poetry uniquely anneals us by bringing us into intimate contact with those parts of ourselves we least understand and therefore most fear, Lorde adds:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngAs we learn to bear the intimacy of scrutiny and to flourish within it, as we learn to use the products of that scrutiny for power within our living, those fears which rule our lives and form our silences begin to lose their control over us.

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One of English artist Margaret C. Cook’s illustrations for a rare 1913 edition of Leaves of Grass. (Available as a print.)

I am reminded of the shared root of the words power and possibility in posse, Latin for “to be able,” as I read Lorde’s incisive insistence that for women, this place of possibility is buried beneath strata of historical silence and is therefore especially powerful once poetry — “poetry as a revelatory distillation of experience, not the sterile word play” — does the vital work of excavation:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngFor each of us as women, there is a dark place within, where hidden and growing our true spirit rises… These places of possibility within ourselves are dark because they are ancient and hidden; they have survived and grown strong through that darkness. Within these deep places, each one of us holds an incredible reserve of creativity and power, of unexamined and unrecorded emotion and feeling.

These reserves, Lorde argues, have remained hidden for epochs because the white founding fathers — of nations, of notions — have not honored them, have not named them, have not inscribed them into the collective vocabulary of standardized thought and selective memory we call culture. From this recognition rises, tender and titanic, the central animating ethos of her essay, of her life. A generation after Rebecca West insisted in her superb meditation on storytelling and survival that “art is not a plaything, but a necessity, and its essence, form, is not a decorative adjustment, but a cup into which life can be poured and lifted to the lips and be tasted,” Lorde writes:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngPoetry is not a luxury. It is a vital necessity of our existence. It forms the quality of the light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action. Poetry is the way we help give name to the nameless so it can be thought. The farthest horizons of our hopes and fears are cobbled by our poems, carved from the rock experiences of our daily lives.

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Art by Beatrice Alemagna for A Velocity of Being: Letters to a Young Reader.

In a sentiment evocative of Hannah Arendt’s sobering insight into speech, action, and how we change the world, Lorde considers what it takes for women, for non-white persons, for persons of daring and divergence from the status quo, to reconceptualize culture, then take action that bridges the new conception with a new reality:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngAs they become known to and accepted by us, our feelings and the honest exploration of them become sanctuaries and spawning grounds for the most radical and daring of ideas. They become a safe-house for that difference so necessary to change and the conceptualization of any meaningful action… We can train ourselves to respect our feelings and to transpose them into a language so they can be shared. And where that language does not yet exist, it is our poetry which helps to fashion it. Poetry is not only dream and vision; it is the skeleton architecture of our lives. It lays the foundations for a future of change, a bridge across our fears of what has never been before.

Poetry, Lorde intimates, is also a singular prism for the present that becomes a portal of light from our impossible pasts to our possible futures. In a sentiment that especially gladdens me, as someone who dwells in the lives of the long-dead and unpeels the patina of neglect and indifference from their most luminous ideas for a more livable future, Lorde adds:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngThere are no new ideas still waiting in the wings to save us… There are only old and forgotten ones, new combinations, extrapolations and recognitions from within ourselves — along with the renewed courage to try them out. And we must constantly encourage ourselves and each other to attempt the heretical actions that our dreams imply, and so many of our old ideas disparage. In the forefront of our move toward change, there is only poetry to hint at possibility made real. Our poems formulate the implications of ourselves, what we feel within and dare make real (or bring action into accordance with), our fears, our hopes, our most cherished terrors.

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Art by Kenard Pak for A Velocity of Being: Letters to a Young Reader.

To step into that place of possibility, Lorde argues, requires that we question the notions we have taken as givens from the dominant culture, few more dangerous and limiting than the propagandist dictum that poetry — that is, the life of feeling, which is our locus of power, which is our fulcrum of action — is a luxury. In consonance with E.E. Cummings’s magnificent manifesto for being unafraid to feel, she writes:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngWithin living structures defined by profit, by linear power, by institutional dehumanization, our feelings were not meant to survive… We have hidden that fact in the same place where we have hidden our power. They surface in our dreams, and it is our dreams that point the way to freedom. Those dreams are made realizable through our poems that give us the strength and courage to see, to feel, to speak, and to dare. If what we need to dream, to move our spirits most deeply and directly toward and through promise, is discounted as a luxury, then we give up the core — the fountain — of our power… the future of our worlds.

For there are no new ideas. There are only new ways of making them felt — of examining what those ideas feel like being lived on Sunday morning at 7 A.M., after brunch, during wild love, making war, giving birth, mourning our dead — while we suffer the old longings, battle the old warnings and fears of being silent and impotent and alone, while we taste new possibilities and strengths.

Complement this fragment of the wholly indispensable and inspiriting Selected Works of Audre Lorde with Lorde on silence, strength, and vulnerability and the importance of unity across difference in movements of social change, then revisit Adrienne Rich on the political power of poetry, Susan Sontag on the conscience of words, Robert Penn Warren on power, tenderness, and poetry as an instrument of democracy, and Grammy-winning musician Cécile McLorin Salvant reading Lorde’s poem “The Bees.”

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The thing about sunk costs -Seth godin’s newsletter


Tomorrow is another opportunity.

There are thirty people over there who are just waiting for you to help connect them, lead them or make things better. But if you’re still defending the stuck project over here, the one you put so much into, you won’t be able to show up for them.

Customers, partners, clients and students who need your voice or your product aren’t going to benefit from it because you’re working so hard to dig yourself out of a previous hole, a situation that is now harder than ever to work your way through.

It’s easy to focus on the problem right in front of us, and to decide that this problem, and only this problem, is the problem for us to solve. But there’s a cost to everything, and the opportunity lost when you’re doing this is just as real, even when you don’t notice it.

Of course, we don’t create contribution by flitting from one thing to another whenever things get difficult. But we also sell ourselves short (and harm the people we’d be able to serve) if we’re unable to quit a project that’s gone sideways.

What happened yesterday already happened. It’s a gift and an asset from your previous self. You don’t have to accept if you don’t want to.

Dutch didn’t rule India – An interesting WhatsApp forward….


Do you know why the Dutch didn’t rule India though they were the earliest European invaders?
It happened when the biggest and the most valuable company in the history of the world was brought down (among other things) by a royal Malayali from India.
There was a moment in history when the Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie (VOC) or simply the Dutch East India Company was the most well funded and powerful Business, military and naval force in the world.
Established in 1602, it had a virtual monopoly of the global spice trade for most of the 17th century and was the first truly multinational corporation in history.
It had a great run and was the Apple or Google of its day – only more successful, profitable- paying on average, an 18% dividend for almost 200 years
Adjusted to inflation, it had the market capitalisation of over 7 Trillion Dollars (in today’s money) – making it perhaps the most valuable company in the history of companies.
The Dutch made most of their money from India – By the early 18th century, the Dutch economic and political power in southern India was at its peak. The Dutch had thrown the Portuguese out, defeated the Mighty Zamorins of Calicut and even sadly turned the powerful kingdom of Kochi into a Vassal State where the crown even bore the Dutch emblem of VOC.
The Dutch East India Company is dead today – in large parts, thanks to this patriotic powerful Indian from Kerala.
Among the many mistakes that ultimately lead to their downfall, perhaps the biggest was committed by Dutch Governor Gustaaf Willem Van Imhoff in 1739.
During the ensuing negotiations between Governor Imhoff and Marthanda Varma, the ruler of Travancore, regarding the Dutch interests in Kochi, when Governor Imhoff threatened Marthanda Varma, that his forces will rake Travancore down to dust.
In his reply – Varma quipped simply:
“With all due respect to you sir, then I will certainly invade Holland, mark my words .”
Obviously miffed, the Governor of the Mighty Dutch empire walked off from the meeting, determined to teach this local king of a small Indian kingdom a lesson.
Soon, a large contingent of Dutch artillery forces landed in Colachel, lead by Captain Eustachius De Lannoy. Their intention was to make a quick dash and capture the capital of Travancore – Padmanabhapuram.
On the 10th of August, 1741, both Armies met in the now famous Battle of Colachel.
Within no time, the Dutch faced a crushing and decisive defeat – most of their soldiers fled and their commander, Eustace De Lannoy was captured along with his deputy.
Marthanda Varma forced the Dutch to sign a peace treaty, taking over most of the Dutch forts in the Malabar region of India and bringing to an end, the Dutch monopoly in the Spice Trade with India.
What’s more, Marthanda Varma even made Eustachius De Lannoy join his forces as a trainer and used him to modernise the Army of Travancore – which later became the Madras Regimentof Independent India.
The Dutch Black Pepper trade monopoly was taken over by the State of Travancore – which made them rich then and now!
In case you wonder how rich – Marthanda Varma re-consecrated an old Temple of Lord Padmanabhaswamy (Lord Vishnu) and regularly donated to it in his lifetime.
Recently, 5 of the 8 sealed chamber Vaults of this temple were opened by the authorities – which yielded a “smallish ” treasure in Gold and Jewels, estimated to be worth a little over USD 22 Billion (making it the richest institution and place of worship in the world). Experts believe that the remaining sealed vaults hold treasures worth a Trillion dollars
While Marthanda Varma, an Indian, had his life moment in world history – our disgraceful Indian Historians didn’t think of his achievements as important enough to even deserve a mention in our school textbooks.
If you care more and are an Indian with self respect and pride, irrespective of where you come from in India- spread this factual historical event far and wide!
The battle we were not told about

Adam Smith warned us about sympathising with the elites | Psyche Ideas


The Little Ice Age is a history of resilience and surprises | Aeon Essays


great commandments worth following


You shall not worship false idols.
You shall see justice is done according to god’s will.
You shall not attempt to free those who await judgment or punishment.
You shall love your neighbor.
You shall offer a meal to hungry strangers.
You shall care for the world for it is god’s creation.
You shall not boast about your achievements.
You shall not dwell on the past.
You shall believe in no other gods.
You shall not forge the word of god.

Who Is Epictetus? From Slave To World’s Most Sought After Philosopher


3 Exercises & Lessons From Epictetus 1. Remember What’s In Your Control The Enchiridion begins with one of the most important maxims in Stoic philosophy. The importance of distinguishing things that are under our control and things that are not. (Think of it as the Stoic Serenity Prayer.) It is a reminder not to get angry and upset by things which we cannot influence such as other people and external events and to only focus on ourselves, our own behavior. This makes things a bit easier, doesn’t it? A humbling reminder of how much happens that we can’t influence and learning to let go and accept things as they are. Yet at the same time, a powerful reminder that our actions and choices are fully in our own control. As Epictetus said, “Some things are in our control and others not. Things in our control are opinion, pursuit, desire, aversion, and, in a word, whatever are our own actions. Things not in our control are body, property, reputation, command, and, in one word, whatever are not our own actions.” 2. Set the Standard The best leaders rarely talk how things ought to be done, their actions speak for themselves. Think of someone you admired and how many of the lessons came indirectly from the choices that they’ve made and the example they have set. Similarly, we need to be focused on how we are actually living and what choices we are making. That’s where our time and energy will be best spent. As Epictetus put it, “Never call yourself a philosopher, nor talk a great deal among the unlearned about theorems, but act conformably to them. Thus, at an entertainment, don’t talk how persons ought to eat, but eat as you ought.” 3. Prescribe Yourself a Character Epictetus understood how much we act out of habit and how we tend to think that our ways of doing things are set in stone. He admonished his students to set some principles and standards they need to follow and not deviate as much as possible. This is certainly not easy by any stretch but with small steps, each day reminding us what direction we’d like to go to, we can get closer to the character we wish to have. As he put it, “Immediately prescribe some character and form of conduce to yourself, which you may keep both alone and in company.” Epictetus Quotes “No thing great is created suddenly, any more than a bunch of grapes or a fig. If you tell me that you desire a fig, I answer you that there must be time. Let it first blossom, then bear fruit, then ripen.” “Let death and exile, and all other things which appear terrible, be daily before your eyes, but death chiefly; and you will never entertain any abject thought, nor too eagerly covet anything.” “Demand not that events should happen as you wish; but wish them to happen as they do happen, and your life will be serene.” “Sickness is an impediment to the body, but not to the will, unless itself pleases. Lameness is an impediment to the leg, but not to the will; and say this to yourself with regard to everything that happens. For you will find it to be an impediment to something else, but not truly to yourself.” “I cannot escape death; but cannot I escape the dread of it? Must I die trembling and lamenting?” “To make the best of what is in our power, and take the rest as it occurs.”

Who Is Epictetus? From Slave To World’s Most Sought After Philosopher

The Smooth And Happy Bird


The Smooth And Happy Bird

A Poem by Anonymous

Whose bird is that? I think I know.
Its owner is quite angry though.
He was cross like a dark potato.
I watch him pace. I cry hello.

He gives his bird a shake,
And screams I’ve made a bad mistake.
The only other sound’s the break,
Of distant waves and birds awake.

The bird is smooth, happy and deep,
But he has promises to keep,
Tormented with nightmares he never sleeps.
Revenge is a promise a man should keep.

He rises from his cursed bed,
With thoughts of violence in his head,
A flash of rage and he sees red.
Without a pause I turned and fled.With thanks to the poet, Robert Frost, for the underlying structure.

Funny and humorous speech topics


List of Funny and Humorous Speech Topics

Persuasive

  1. Boys gossip more than girls do.
  2. Should Trix stop its discrimination and make them for everyone?
  3. Blame your horoscope for why things went wrong
  4. Why you should never take on a food challenge
  5. Breakup insurance policy should be invented
  6. Which came first: the chicken or the egg?
  7. Why men shouldn’t wear skinny jeans
  8. Vegetables have feelings – stop carrot cruelty
  9. Camping: the fun and the not so fun
  10. Why kids should make jokes in class
  11. Why lying well can be helpful
  12. Why I should marry Cameron Diaz
  13. When nothing goes left, go right
  14. Grown-ups are weird species
  15. Blame your dog for things
  16. Why getting lost is the best advice someone could give you
  17. The reason grass appears greener on the other side is because it is probably fake.
  18. In order to become old and wise, you must first be young and stupid.
  19. Yes, you should write that down, because you will forget.
  20. We can lie but our facial expressions can’t.
  21. Life should come with background music.
  22. Chocolate never asks stupid questions.
  23. Sometimes when you need expert advice you should just have a chat with yourself.
  24. In order to understand what life is all about you should hang out with a three year old.
  25. The most dangerous animal out there is a silent woman.
  26. We don’t mean to interrupt people’s conversations, it’s just that we remember random things and get really excited.
  27. Wouldn’t it be great to have a six-month vacation twice a year?
  28. Nothing sucks more than when you are in the middle of an argument and realize that you are wrong.
  29. When you get older you will regret not taking all those naps as a child.
  30. I sometimes feel that the internet could do with a sarcasm font.
  31. Some of the bad decisions are necessary so you can have great stories to tell.
  32. Sometimes you will need to keep a contact number on your phone so that you can avoid their nuisance calls.
  33. How many times is it appropriate to say “excuse me”, before you give up and nod instead?
  34. A woman’s “I will be ready in 5 minutes” is the same as a man’s “I will be home in 5 minutes”.
  35. “We will see” means it’s probably not going to happen.
  36. Adults these days can barely do Math without using a calculator but are always claiming to have X amount of problems.
  37. Being an adult is not an easy task.
  38. Life feels very much like a test I didn’t study for.
  39. You are not weird; you are just a limited edition.
  40. There is no need to sugar coat everything, we can’t all be Willy Wonka.
  41. Not everyone will like you and that is okay because not everyone has good taste.
  42. Most people make mistakes five or six times, just to be sure.
  43. Be happy, it drives people crazy!
  44. Before you marry someone you should see how they react to slow internet.
  45. Alcohol clearly increases the size of the send button.
  46. We all need a day in which we can be just as useless as the ‘g’ in lasagne.
  47. Those who say they slept like a baby have obviously never had a baby.
  48. No, underarm farts are not an impressive party trick.
  49. Why do we panic when our phones fall but laugh when our friends do?
  50. Why do we remember all the things we forgot to do once we are in bed?
  51. Stop telling people that your baby is 28 months old!
  52. Cinderella is proof that a new pair of shoes can change your life.
  53. Why people calculate how many hours of sleep they will get.
  54. What is it with men and remote control buttons?
  55. Behind every great man is a woman rolling her eyes.
  56. It is probably wise to keep your Mom off of Facebook.
  57. Clowns are scary and this is why.
  58. The true list of Christmas gifts I would like to give my family.
  59. Why Mondays should be banned.
  60. It is not okay to be 30 and still live with your parents.
  61. Men gossip more than women.
  62. Stop bragging about being at the gym – nobody cares!
  63. We can lie to the world, but not to ourselves.
  64. You should never start your diet on a Monday.
  65. By plans I mean I want to stay home and watch Netflix.
  66. Why you should smile and wave when someone insults you.
  67. If you are going to be two-faced at least make one of them pretty.
  68. Some people truly believe that they know everything, do they think their name is google?
  69. I wish the world would shock me by saying something intelligent.
  70. Women shouldn’t treat their faces like a colouring book.
  71. Some people are so fake, that Barbie is starting to get jealous.
  72. You are always entitled to your own incorrect opinion.
  73. Do people expect us to take notes when they tell us what to do?
  74. Just because it fits it doesn’t mean that it actually fits.
  75. It’s okay, you can explain yourself out of compromising positions.
  76. Auto correct could ruin your life.
  77. Some people are all bark but no bite.
  78. Why read the book when you can just watch the movie?
  79. Growing old is mandatory but growing up is completely optional.
  80. Money does talk and it usually likes to say ‘bye-bye’.
  81. The good news is that if today is the worst day of your life, then you know that tomorrow will be better.
  82. Some of the best people out there are crazy.
  83. Common sense is a flower that does not grow in everyone’s garden.
  84. Sometimes you just need to take a nap and get over it.
  85. Daddy is the boss until Mommy gets home.
  86. To avoid trouble, you must always cut a toddler’s sandwich in the correct shape.
  87. People often lie on a first date so that they can secure the second one.
  88. Why wrong is wrong even if everyone is doing it.
  89. Yes, actually you can have your cake and eat it too!
  90. You should never be the party pooper.
  91. Disney movies are great until they all start singing.
  92. “Too busy” is just a myth.
  93. Teenagers need to remember that not that long ago they use to beg their mothers to watch them poop.
  94. Wouldn’t it be great if when we took a long nap people would be proud of us like they are when kids do?
  95. You know it is going to be a long day when your partner is upset about something you did in their dream.
  96. Sometimes our greatest accomplishment is to just keep quiet.
  97. Why Math feels like Mental Abuse To Humans.
  98. You need to marry the person who gives you the same feeling you get when you see food coming at a restaurant.
  99. Touch a pregnant belly at your own risk.
  100. If you mess with the bull you will get the horns.
  101. Why exactly did ‘that’s cool’ become ‘that’s hot’?
  102. People must stop randomly using the word ‘random’ for everything.
  103. How not wearing any makeup makes people think you are sick these days.
  104. LOL is usually what people reply with when they have nothing else to say.
  105. Why exactly is it called a crush?
  106. If Cinderella’s shoe fit perfectly in the end, why did it fall off in the first place?
  107. The only reason why we should want to go back in time is to repeat the fun parts.
  108. When we start to question if a word even exists.
  109. Before Facebook I had a life.
  110. Smile while you still have teeth.
  111. Why laughter is the best medicine.
  112. Three reasons why … (fill in your favorite cheerleader team here) will win the Superbowl this year.
  113. Fainting for high school is pretty common and often not a sign of something serious.
  114. Why rose is the best flowers’ fragrance many women like.
  115. Girls under 12 should not be allowed to wear makeup.
  116. Wendy’s / Burger King / McDonald’s (choose your fast food restaurant) has the best service and consumer complaint codes of conduct.
  117. My favorite Agent 007 James Bond is … (fill in the actor / actress of your choice here. Or do choose another movie hero for alternative humorous persuasive speech topics)
  118. Design your own How Cool Are You test and persuade your audience to take it.
  119. Seven signs that she is a real bitch type, and ways how to handle her.
  120. Five requirements to be called a bestie by girlfriends.
  121. Three symptoms that show you are definitely addicted to online quizzes.
  122. Fingerprints are unique for every human.
  123. Diet or regular drinks: it doesn’t matter at all what you drink.
  124. We should adapt the Chinese Calender / National Calendar of India.
  125. We should print small fun items on our coins that symbolizes our nation.
  126. What you should wear / not wear when giving a prom speech.
  127. Presidential running mates are politicians who were not able to reach the top themselves.
  128. How to get – more – Valentine Day cards next year.
  129. Nomen est omen (latin for name is omen) occurs more often than you think.
  130. Kung fu training skills should be mandatory for college and high school sports girls and women teachers.
  131. Vampires and ghosts are only historical legend figures, nevertheless they have much impact on our society when it comes to superstition.
  132. Thirteen is a lucky number.
  133. Why there are so many kangaroo, wombats, sheep and koalas in Australia.
  134. Why Rumpulstilskin is my favorite fairy tale.
  135. People prefer a clean shaven face instead of a beard or mustache.
  136. Dating someone who is much older than you are is the only way to date.
  137. Love at first sight really does exist.
  138. Lady Gaga has beaten Britney Spears.
  139. Men like action and women like romantic movies.
  140. Boyfriends must act romantic.
  141. (fill in the title of the song of your choice) is the funniest song ever.
  142. The Human cannonball stunt should be an entertainment event at our next campus event.
  143. Jay Leno is funny because he has good joke writers.
  144. Having a third arm is better than a third leg.
  145. Leather belts with a large buckle look good on guys.
  146. Experiencing the thrill of a Space Shuttle trip is too expensive.
  147. Why it’s a good idea to always google a person before you meet her or him for the first time.
  148. Ten ways to use Twitter with fun public speaking purposes in a maximum of 140 characters.
  149. Why many students rather text a friend than call her/him.
  150. Bingo competitions keep grandmas off the streets.
  151. Don’t take life too seriously – and yourself 🙂
  152. How to get rid of boring blind dates.
  153. Blaming your dog for everything that goes wrong is an old way-out.
  154. 99% percent of the blonds are not stupid at all.
  155. How to annoy the passenger next to you on a flight.
  156. The beneficial effects of smoking.
  157. Some phrases you use to be funny but actually turn out to be boring.
  158. Jerry Springerruined America
  159. Dessert should always be served before dinner
  160. Golf and Poker: Two things that should never be televised
  161. Personal things you should always keep to yourself
  162. Department stores shouldn’t be allowed to sell ugly clothing
  163. Why you should leave the marriage counseling tips to the marriage counselors
  164. Facebookis ruining lives every day
  165. Why the perfect husband just doesn’t exist
  166. Pigs have better manners than most men
  167. Rain: It really does have a smell
  168. Women are much better at handling pain than men
  169. Why famous people must have a crew of makeup artists and hair stylists following them around all day
  170. Why Subway is a total rip off
  171. Totally useless professions
  172. If only men spent as much time working on their relationships as they do focusing on sports
  173. Parent fails
  174. Why everyone wants a pet monkey
  175. What happens in high school doesn’t really matter all that much

Once you have chosen a topic, you will need to compose the speech structure. This sample of outline will help you getting started. The example topic is: “How to convince the teacher that a household pet ate your homework.”

Start the talk by introducing yourself. For example, “Good Morning, my name is ____.” Then, go for the “gold.” Hit the audience with a statement or question that will grab their attention immediately. Another example: “Who remembers using the excuse that my dog ate my term paper?”

The body of the speech: Three points
Hopefully, with the audience waiting with baited breath, the time is ripe to hit them with three good reasons for them to listen to, and agree with, what is being said.

  1. Your sister’s pet hamster died, and she needed a small piece of paper to wrap the body in and used your homework paper.
  2. Your brother was making bedding for his pet gerbil and ran out of newspaper to cut into strips and used your term paper instead.
  3. Your new dog has been trained to pee on newspaper on the floor, and your homework papers had slipped off the kitchen counter, and, well….

Closing argument
More than three points can be made, if indicated. But at least three points should always be used. To close your argument, summarize and end with a strong reason why the audience should agree with you. For example, “With the number and variety of pets available today, one does not have to use the family dog all the time as an excuse for not doing one’s homework.”

There is more to the experience of wine than its taste alone | Psyche Ideas