gastro obscura newsletter





Ice Cream to the Rescue
Japan’s roadside service areas are home to unique soft cream flavors such as blue honeysuckle, scallop, and black squid ink—flavors that celebrate Japan’s various regional identities. 
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Native American Seed Reunion
Centuries after their loss and theft, Native American seeds are reuniting with their tribes. This is in part due to the work of the Indigenous Seed Keepers Network, a group of more than 100 tribal seed-sovereignty projects whose members are looking for their missing relatives.
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EL RENO, OKLAHOMA
Fried Onion Burger
When the Great Depression swept the United States, beef became a luxury, and cooks had to get creative to keep their burgers affordable. Enter the fried onion burger, or a “Depression burger,” which combined smashed onions within the patty.
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Do Not Drink Medicinal Turpentine
For thousands of years, turpentine was not just used as a water repellant or paint thinner. It was also used as a medicine. Suffice to say: most modern doctors strongly advise against ingesting it at all.
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Bring State Fair Foods To You
State fairs may be canceled, but it doesn’t mean that you can’t still enjoy award-winning foods. Try your hand at these recipes, which reveal how many rich stories lurk in America’s soil, cookbooks, stained index cards, and tables.
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BRITTANY, FRANCE
A Hyper-Decadent Pastry
Behold kouign-amann, a regional French specialty in Brittany that features croissant dough laminated in salted butter and rolled in sugar. Some Bretons claim that this signature treat is the fattiest pastry in the world.
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GLASGOW, SCOTLAND
Sir Thomas Lipton’s Grave
Inside Glasgow’s Southern Necropolis Cemetery, you might notice one grave with tea bags beside it. These tributes are in honor of Sir Thomas Lipton, one of the tea industry’s most important figures.
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ATLAS OBSCURA EXPERIENCES
The Art of Pickling
Fermentation may be all the rage these days in quarantine, but the process reflects ancient wisdom. Join us as we dive into the art of Jewish pickling traditions, using ingredients you probably have at home.
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