word of the day


WORD OF THE DAY
BeadleBEE-dlPart of speech: nounOrigin: Old English, 16th century
1A ceremonial officer of a church, college, or similar institution.2A minor parish officer dealing with petty offenders.
 
Examples of Beadle in a sentence “The award will be presented by the beadle.” “As beadle, he was responsible for enforcing the parking regulations in the small town.”

United States: Jeff Tobolski, Former McCook Mayor And Cook County Commissioner, Pleads Guilty To Bribery Scheme


Ethical Alliance Daily News

United States: Jeff Tobolski, Former McCook Mayor And Cook County Commissioner, Pleads Guilty To Bribery Scheme
Sep 02, 2020 06:00 pm
Former McCook Mayor and Cook County Commissioner Jeff Tobolski have pleaded guilty to federal corruption charges, admitting he accepted multiple bribes totaling more than $250,000. Tobolski, who is cooperating with federal investigators, was first charged last month with conspiracy to commit extortion and filing a false tax return, but at the time
Read More 

Brazil: Head of Brazil’s ‘Car Wash’ anti-graft task force quits with team’s future in doubt
Sep 02, 2020 05:30 pm
The head of Brazil’s top corruption-busting team of federal prosecutors will quit the task force that dismantled the country’s biggest graft network and jailed a former president for taking bribes, the team announced on Tuesday. Deltan Dallagnol’s departure comes at a time when the so-called “Car Wash” investigation, which began
Read More 

Mexico: Mexicans seek referendum on trying ex-presidents for graft
Sep 02, 2020 05:00 pm
Mexican activists have begun gathering signatures for a referendum on charging former presidents with graft, heeding calls by President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who on Tuesday said he would respect the outcome of a public vote on the issue. While Lopez Obrador has said he does not favor bringing former
Read More 

Singapore: Joint effort, tech in prosecuting white-collar crimes: AGC
Sep 02, 2020 04:30 pm
While technology misuse can lead to the theft of millions with a few keystrokes, updated technology has also helped prosecutors find the proverbial needle in the haystack or digital evidence. In addition to staying abreast of cutting-edge technology, prosecutors in the Attorney-General’s Chambers (AGC) have, in complex cases, partnered enforcement
Read More 

Kenya: Kenyan orders ministry of health to publish all COVID-19 procurements
Sep 02, 2020 04:00 pm
Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta on Monday directed the Ministry of Health to publish details of all procurements related to COVID-19, particularly those undertaken by the Kenya Medical Supplies Agency (KEMSA) amid allegations of corruption. Kenyatta said the publication of procurement information including winners of tenders is an act of transparency
Read More 

Thailand: Finance Ministry gets evidence of graft in Thai Airways
Sep 02, 2020 03:30 pm
A Transport Ministry panel on corruption filed 18 documents of evidence against Thai Airways International (THAI) with the Finance Ministry on Tuesday (Sept 1), pending an investigation into mismanagement of the debt-ridden airline. As a state agency, THAI racked up about Bt250 billion in debts before asking for court-supervised restructuring
Read More 
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Can you know everything about colour if you see in black and white? A thought experiment | Aeon Videos


Can you know everything about colour if you see in black and white? A thought experiment

Can we ever know everything about something we can’t experience? The Australian philosopher Frank Jackson pondered this question in a thought experiment in 1982, which imagined a neuroscientist named Mary who understood everything there was to understand about colour vision, without ever having experienced it herself. If, in an instant, her black-and-white experience of sight shifted into colour, would she glean any new insight?

Detailed with stylish, shapeshifting animation in this short from TED-Ed, Jackson’s thought experiment ponders felt subjective experience (or ‘qualia’, for all the past and current philosophy students) and its relationship to knowledge. The questions raised by ‘Mary’s Room’ – including whether anything about experience transcends physical facts – remain some of the most perennial and unsettled in philosophy, even if Jackson himself actually reversed his position, concluding that the experience of colour vision does indeed correspond to a brain state, albeit one we don’t yet fully understand.

Video by TED-Ed

Writer: Eleanor Nelsen

Animator: Maxime Dupuy

Salt in the Himalayas via pnuts newsletter


Salt in the Himalayas

(Yawar Nazir via Getty Images)

  • India is strengthening its troops and infrastructure along the disputed Himalayan border after renewed clashes between Chinese and Indian troops. Reports coming in over the weekend said hundreds of China’s People’s Liberation Army soldiers had attempted to move forward to strategic points on the southern banks of Pangong Lake in eastern Ladakh. 
  • One Indian soldier, a member of the elite army unit that patrols the Himalayan border, was said to have died in a mine blast on Sunday near the disputed area of Pangong Lake. India condemned what officials described as “provocative military movements” that violated the ongoing consensus to disengage. 
  • China countered, claiming India had “grossly violated” its territorial integrity and “illegally trespassed” across the disputed border, known as the Line of Actual Control. China also denied that any Indian soldier had died. Months of diplomatic and military-level talks between the two nuclear-armed powers have failed to defuse the confrontations in Ladakh, which began in May. (Guardian)

Toastmasters International -Table Topics Workout


https://www.toastmasters.org/magazine/articles/table-topics-workout

A TABLE TOPICS WORKOUT

The power-packed exercise for stretching your brain.

technology humor

This article is from the February 2016 edition of the Toastmaster magazine.

Roscoe Drummond, an American journalist, once said, “The mind is a wonderful thing. It starts working the minute you are born, and never stops until you get up to speak in public.”

Hmm, was he talking about Table Topics?

Table Topics has been a key component of the Toastmasters program for many, many years. The 1936 club officer training manual prescribes a typical meeting agenda and defines a “table topic.” The manual reads, “This topic becomes the theme for informal discussion in which each member is expected to participate, with the exception of those assigned as speakers on the regular program. The purpose is to get every member on his feet at every meeting.

Decades later, Table Topics is still a signature club activity. While the purpose of encouraging participation remains the same, the benefits embrace much more. That simple one- to two-minute impromptu speech can transform your communication and leadership skills. Love it or loathe it, Table Topics is a powerful tool for growth.

Every day, we engage in impromptu speaking. In conversation, you speak off-the-cuff. When asked for your opinion, or a summary of a task at work, you speak extemporaneously. Table Topics hones the skill of creating an impromptu response that is laser-focused, compelling and engaging.

If you struggle with small talk, or desire to give a good interview, Table Topics will help. You’ll be a better conversationalist and your professional presence will improve. In a corporate environment, you may need to develop “sound bite”-type answers for the CEO, or develop your promotional elevator pitch. If you are a person learning English as a second language, Table Topics is ideal for exercising your conversational skills. Participating in Table Topics helps you develop critical and organized thinking skills because you have to think quickly, and if you participate frequently you will lose those verbal crutches, the dreaded “ahs” and “ums,” much faster.

Dwayne Windham, DTM, from Laughing Matters club in Austin, Texas, is passionate about how Table Topics has benefitted him. “I work in technical support, a constant, unending world of ‘table topics.’ Pick up the phone, and you’re on stage trying to answer ‘Why is it doing this?’ ‘How do I make it do this?’ Every time you use audible fillers—‘ah,’ ‘um,’ ‘you know’—your credibility drops and it’s more likely that someone will demand to speak to a manager. The more you can provide prompt, succinct, accurate responses, the better your numbers, and the better service you deliver.”

Table Topics can help a timid speaker emerge into a more confident one without being overwhelmed by developing a five- to seven-minute speech. Joyce Teal, ACB, CL, from Monday Mumblers Toastmasters in Chattanooga, Tennessee, loves to see those who are nervous about speaking take a turn. She says they are always surprised by how much they enjoy it and how confident they feel afterwards. Similarly, guests often embrace Table Topics. Katherine Hanneman, DTM, from the Hickam AFB club in Honolulu, Hawaii, says, “Guests who are encouraged to participate in Table Topics have a feeling of fitting in and belonging, and they are more likely to join. Table Topics is a magic wand that makes fear disappear and creates an eagerness to do more.”

Why Is It So Difficult?
Many Toastmasters love Table Topics because impromptu speaking comes easily to them. They may even prefer it to drafting, practicing, memorizing and delivering manual speeches. Binoj K. Ravi, CC, of Assisi Toastmasters in Kerala, India, is an engineer with previous experience in training and education, and he is very comfortable with impromptu speaking. However, after several years of not teaching, he felt his skills deteriorating, so he joined a club to regain his sharpness. Creating a prepared speech was a challenge for him. “I am a spontaneous speaker,” he says. “I can’t memorize well. But I gain the most from Table Topics.” He even proposes delivering an impromptu five- to seven-minute speech to further improve his own skills.

If you, unlike Ravi, struggle with impromptu speaking, you are not alone. Science explains why. Researchers from Rice University, Johns Hopkins University and Columbia University recently published their conclusions that our abilities to speak and write are controlled from two separate but closely located areas of the brain. This is why people write differently from how they speak, and vice versa. When writing a speech, we edit ideas more slowly, using formal, less conversational phrases. When we speak off-the-cuff, we don’t edit as much. In other words, we think before we write but we speak before we think, and the thinking comes from two different brain areas. Table Topics helps exercise and discipline the brain to even out this disparity.

Common Concerns
What are your Table Topics concerns? Maybe you’re afraid of looking foolish, or you’re unfamiliar with the topic. Maybe you fear sharing an opinion on a controversial topic, or getting too emotional. Maybe you wish you had a different topic. Maybe you feel pressured to be funny, profound, accurate, concise or entertaining. You might even think the topic is too frivolous. Division Director Dale Goff, DTM, of Dobson-Craddock Toastmasters in South Charleston, West Virginia, says, “I feel Table Topics, like much of Toastmasters, is designed for professional development. Is it just a game? Let’s get back to basics and hone our professional skills.” Many members agree, but other members enjoy the chance to be more creative, and even theatrical. Both approaches work, because the skills developed in Table Topics are transferable beyond the club setting.

4 Steps to Terrific Table Topic Answers
So, what can you do to improve? Try this simple four-step approach to developing a great response.

  • Think Calmly: Before the meeting starts, bring to the forefront of your mind some recent conversations or events so you may have access to possible responses. When you hear the topic, stay silent. Breathe, refer to your inventory of recent thoughts, and choose one point or story that fits. (Note: This does not mean scripting an answer ahead of time and forcing it to fit the topic. That defeats the purpose.)
  • Organize Clearly: Develop an opening, body and closing. Many people open by repeating the question, but that is a weak opening. Open as you would a speech, perhaps with a quote, statistic or question, such as, “Don’t you agree that …?” Then make your point (or tell a quick story), and use a close that ties to the opening.
  • Deliver Masterfully: Don’t forget eye contact, body language, vocal variety, grammar and pronunciation. Watch the ahs, ums and ya-knows.
  • Time Perfectly: Most of us are unaware of how much (or little) we say in one or two minutes. Table Topics forces loquacious people to condense their words, and timid people to expand them. Watch the timing signals.

Would you like more preparation time? Darren LaCroix, the 2001 Toastmasters World Champion of Public Speaking, suggests improv classes. “In Table Topics, you’re given a topic, and right in the moment, you talk about it. How can you prepare? Improv games! They help you to be more ‘present.’ When you are present, you can handle impromptu speaking better.” Bruce Yang, DTM, of Taichung Toastmasters, Taichung City, Taiwan, agrees. He sees the parallel between improvisation and Table Topics. He marvels at an improv performer’s ability to immediately connect the dots in order to evoke a picture in the listeners’ minds.

Unique and Creative Approaches
The freedom to be creative and unpredictable is a hallmark of Table Topics. Greg Gazin, DTM, from New Entrepreneurs club in Alberta, Canada, says, “Once, we selected unfamiliar words from the dictionary and asked participants for definitions. We had creative and funny answers, then we revealed the true definitions.” For example: The word homerkin reminded members of The Simpsons TV show, but actually, it’s a very old word for a measurement of beer.

One club created an out-of-the-box Table Topics experience, literally. Aero Speakers Toastmasters in Laverton, Melbourne, Australia, conducted an outdoor session at a local open-air market on a busy Saturday, patterning it after the famous Hyde Park (London) soapbox style where someone stands on a box to deliver a speech, eliciting responses from passers-by.

Helen McKenzie-Fairlie, ACB, CL, of Satdy Arvo Communicators club in Port Melbourne, worked to help charter Aero Speakers and was involved in the project. She proudly reflects on this unusual experience: “Our purpose was to recruit new members. Within two months, the club chartered, but it was not because the market event created new members. Rather, it was because we gained confidence. Toastmasters lives up to its promise of developing skills.” Personal testimonies like that are persuasive to prospective members.

And then there’s the out-of-the-bag approach. Lau Kiang Siang, CL, from Historical City Toastmasters in Malacca, Malaysia, visited the Thai Airways International club in Bangkok, Thailand, where “the Table Topicsmaster called the members and guests to draw items out of the bag to use as their topic.”

Or how about a “tag-team” approach of storytelling? The Topicsmaster starts a story with a simple “Once upon a time …” or “T’was a dark and stormy night …” and calls on a person to craft the next part. After a minute, that person calls on another to continue the story, and so on. Still another innovative method is described by Douglas Wilks, ACB, CL, of District 78 Skills Club in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. “I chose some world records from the Guinness book and had each speaker describe the record they broke and why they chose to break it. Everyone at the meeting commented how fun it was.”

The variations are endless, the fun is limitless, and the benefits are boundless. This time-tested custom of impromptu speaking is a robust way to improve your skills. The next time you are called on for Table Topics, rethink Roscoe Drummond’s quote to be this instead: “The mind is a wonderful thing. It starts working the minute you are born, and never stops …” especially when you get up for Table Topics.

Toastmasters International -90 Tips From Toastmasters


90 TIPS FROM TOASTMASTERS

1. Know your material. Speak about a topic you’re interested in and know a lot about. Reinforce your message with facts and statistics, if possible. https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-0&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Know%20Your%20Material&time=1599005976372&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

2. Make it personal. Use humor, personal anecdotes and conversational language to make your speech engaging.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-1&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Make%20it%20Personal&time=1599005976373&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

3. Practice makes permanent. Rehearse your speech aloud using any equipment and/or visual aids you’ll use during your presentation. Rehearse as often as you can.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-2&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Practice%20Makes%20Permanent&time=1599005976374&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

4. Time yourself. Time your speech every time you rehearse it to ensure you don’t go over the five- to seven-minute time limit. https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-3&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Time%20Yourself&time=1599005976374&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters 

5. Pace yourself. People tend to rush when they’re nervous, so practice keeping your speech at a calm, steady pace.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-4&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Pace%20Yourself&time=1599005976375&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

6. Arrive early. Give yourself enough time to get acquainted with the stage or presentation area, and test the microphone and any visual aids you’ll be using.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-5&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Arrive%20Early&time=1599005976375&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

7. Relax. Breathe and stretch before taking the stage. Pause for a few seconds, smile and count to three before speaking.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-6&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Relax&time=1599005976376&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters 

8. Visualize your success. Imagine yourself giving your speech: your voice is loud, clear and confident. Imagine hearing the audience’s applause – it will boost your confidence.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-7&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Visualize%20Your%20Success&time=1599005976376&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

9. Trust your audience. The audience isn’t your enemy – they want you to be interesting, stimulating, informative and entertaining. They’re rooting for you.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-8&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Trust%20Your%20Audience&time=1599005976376&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

10. Don’t apologize. If you make a mistake, there’s no need to say you’re sorry. Pick up where you left off and keep going.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-9&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Don%27t%20Apologize&time=1599005976377&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

11. Use humor when things go wrong. If something goes wrong during your speech, tell a quick joke to help put you and your audience at ease. For example, if the lights go out, a good joke might be: “Who forgot to pay the electric bill?”https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-10&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Use%20humor%20when%20things%20go%20wrong&time=1599005976377&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

12. Gain experience. Experience builds confidence, which is the key to effective communication. Joining a Toastmasters club can provide the experience you need in a safe and encouraging environment.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-11&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Gain%20Experience&time=1599005976378&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

13. Eliminate filler words. Using umms and ahhhs in your speech will distract your message. Briefly pause to gather your next thought, or take a sip of water.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-12&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Eliminate%20Filler%20Words&time=1599005976378&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

14. Ditch distracting mannerisms. Nervous fidgeting or gestures will detract from your message. Use purposeful gestures to give your speech more impact.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-13&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Ditch%20Distracting%20Mannerisms&time=1599005976379&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

15. Keep your notes in check. If you need to use notes, be subtle and do not read your speech.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-14&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Keep%20Your%20Notes%20in%20Check&time=1599005976379&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

16. Test your volume. Before your speech, ask a friend or colleague to listen to you from the back of the room to ensure you’re speaking at the right volume.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-15&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Test%20Your%20Volume&time=1599005976380&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

17. Enter contests. Entering contests is a challenging and fun way to improve your skills. Toastmasters offers various speech contests throughout the year.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-16&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Enter%20Contests&time=1599005976380&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

18. Enjoy yourself. Choose a topic on something that is important to you, and that you feel passionate about. Your commitment to the topic will help sell the speech to your audience.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-17&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Enjoy%20Yourself&time=1599005976381&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

19. Use visuals. Make sure your visual aids reinforce your message and don’t distract from it.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-18&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Use%20Visuals&time=1599005976382&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

20. Embrace your unique style. Don’t copy the style or gestures of other speakers, as your audience will sense a lack of authenticity. Be yourself; no one does that better than you can.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-19&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Embrace%20Your%20Unique%20Style&time=1599005976382&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

21. Fuel your mental engine. Eat a light meal at least 20 minutes prior to your speech.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-20&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Fuel%20Your%20Mental%20Engine&time=1599005976382&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

22. Burn off anxiety. Your body produces cortisol when you’re anxious or stressed, which limits your creativity and ability to process complex information. Be sure to burn off cortisol with exercise before any speaking engagement.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-21&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Burn%20Off%20Anxiety&time=1599005976383&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

23. Be prepared for the worst. Murphy’s Law states that anything that can go wrong will go wrong. Be prepared by having print-outs of your presentation slides and a copy of your presentation on USB drive.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-22&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Be%20Prepared%20for%20the%20Worst&time=1599005976383&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

24. Pause. Before addressing your audience, pause for a few seconds. This will gain their attention and increase impact.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-23&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Pause.&time=1599005976384&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

25. Ask a thought-provoking question. Capture the audience’s attention by asking a question they may not know the answer to. For example, “Do you know why the sky is blue? It’s a question many kids ask their parents as kids, and I’m honestly not sure I could explain it without a Google search. But I do know what will turn the sky from blue to grey, and that’s pollution.”https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-24&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Ask%20a%20thought-provoking%20question&time=1599005976384&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

26. Share a startling fact. Everyone loves an interesting piece of information. Be sure to share something that audience will find surprising.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-25&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Share%20a%20startling%20fact.&time=1599005976384&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

27. Don’t overload your slides. Keep your slides concise; don’t overload them with too many talking points.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-26&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Don%27t%20Overload%20Your%20Slides&time=1599005976385&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

28. Repeat the audience’s questions. If an audience member asks a question, repeat it back so everyone can hear it and knows what you are speaking to.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-27&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Repeat%20the%20Audience%27s%20Questions&time=1599005976385&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

29. Give your audience an immediate action item. Audiences love to come away from a speech feeling motivated. Take advantage of their current motivation and give them an immediate action item.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-28&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Give%20Your%20Audience%20an%20Immediate%20Action%20Item&time=1599005976386&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

30. Push the envelope. Take risks, but know your audience and don’t present material simply for shock value. Have a point and the facts to back it up.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-29&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Push%20the%20Envelope&time=1599005976386&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

31. Seek opportunities everywhere. Public speaking doesn’t have to happen in front of an audience. Seek opportunities to practice your communication skills, whether it’s sharing an idea at a work meeting or talking to people in public.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-30&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Seek%20Opportunities%20Everwhere&time=1599005976386&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

32. Be specific. Try to keep your speeches and discussion to the topic on point. Don’t convolute your message with too many stories that stray from the original purpose.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-31&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Be%20Specific&time=1599005976387&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

33. Be the expert. Make sure that you’ve done the appropriate research prior to your public speaking engagement. Explore the topic in depth so that you’re ready for questions and feel comfortable speaking to your topic.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-32&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Be%20the%20Expert&time=1599005976387&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

34. Speak to groups as individuals. While you may be speaking to a group of people, speak to them as though they are just one to make the speech feel more intimate and personal.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-33&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Speak%20to%20Groups%20as%20Individuals&time=1599005976388&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

35. Learn about your personal leadership style. Everyone has a different leadership style. What’s yours? Learn about your leadership style and embrace the positive attributes and make an action plan to change the negative.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-34&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Learn%20Your%20Personal%20Leadership%20Style&time=1599005976388&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

36. Find your strengths. Strengths include, voice volume and timbre, expert knowledge, comfort level and ability to think on the fly. Find those strengths and look for a way to capitalize on them.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-35&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Find%20Your%20Strengths&time=1599005976388&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

37. Be passionate. Find topics that mean a lot to you. If you are asked to speak to a topic that you don’t feel connected with, look for a connection that interests you. Find something that you can take away from the message.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-36&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Be%20Passionate&time=1599005976389&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

38. Have a positive attitude. The best way to fail at something is to think you will. Go into every public speaking situation thinking that it’s an opportunity to grow and engage.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-37&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Have%20a%20Positive%20Attitude&time=1599005976389&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

39. Practice impromptu speaking. Test your skills in business meetings, speaking with a bank teller, or social events.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-38&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Practice%20Impromptu%20Speaking&time=1599005976390&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

40. Encourage honest evaluation. The best speakers learn from each experience. Encourage your audience or interviewer to give you their honest critique of your presentation.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-39&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Encourage%20Honest%20Evaluation&time=1599005976390&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

41. Use quotes, stories and anecdotes. They will help reinforce your message and entertain the audience.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-40&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Use%20Quotes%20Stories%20and%20Anecdotes&time=1599005976390&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

42. Use “you” and “we”. While your speech may require personal stories or anecdotes, be sure to connect the topic with the audience as well. Circle around to explain why it’s important to them.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-41&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Use%20quotes%2C%20stories%20and%20anecdotes&time=1599005976391&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

43. Don’t take things personally. Your audience may have strong opinions about a topic, especially if it’s controversial. Consider their responses educational.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-42&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Don%27t%20Take%20Things%20Personally&time=1599005976392&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

44. Trust your instincts. With leadership and public speaking, it’s always important to trust your instincts. If your gut tells you to steer into another direction or bring up a certain topic, listen to what it says.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-43&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Trust%20Your%20Instincts&time=1599005976392&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

45. Distinguish your goals and targets. It’s important to know the goal of your message and WHY you are speaking to it. The best way to bomb a speech is to not understand the purpose.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-44&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Distinguish%20Your%20Goals%20and%20Targets&time=1599005976392&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

46. Learn from your mistakes. Everyone makes mistakes. The important thing is to appreciate the lesson you learned, and keep moving forward.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-45&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Learn%20From%20Your%20Mistakes&time=1599005976393&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

47. Know when to lose your script. Gauge your audience’s response to your message and know when to change or lose the script. If your audience seems bored or uninterested, move onto to something else.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-46&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Know%20When%20to%20Lose%20Your%20Script&time=1599005976393&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

48. Know the dress code. Research the culture of the audience and how they dress. Dress one level higher than the audience – typically business or business casual.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-47&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Know%20the%20Dress%20Code.&time=1599005976394&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

49. Use slang with caution. Slang words don’t translate well across different cultures and ethnicities. Be careful to make sure that the meaning behind your words is interpreted as intended.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-48&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Use%20Slang%20With%20Caution.&time=1599005976394&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

50. Breathe out. Take slow deep breaths in and then release your breathe from the bottom of your abdomen to get the maximum benefits of release and relaxation.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-49&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Breathe%20Out.&time=1599005976394&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

51. Be patient. Becoming a great speaker will not just happen overnight. There is a process so be patient with yourself.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-50&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Be%20patient.&time=1599005976395&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

52. Treat your speech like fine dining. Approach your speech like a fine five-course meal to be savored one bite at a time, not a fast food meal to be gobbled in a few bites. There’s no need to rush.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-51&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Treat%20Your%20Speech%20Like%20Fine%20Dining.&time=1599005976395&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

53. Start your career off on the right note. The way that you speak in the beginning of your career will set the tone for your career path. Don’t put off building an authentic and powerful speaking style. Make sure you have it before you need it!https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-52&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Start%20Your%20Career%20Off%20On%20The%20Right%20Note.&time=1599005976395&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

54. Own your worth. You deserve the chance to be heard and share your ideas. Don’t feel bad sharing them.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-53&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Own%20Your%20Worth.&time=1599005976396&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

55. When you disagree with someone, rebut their ideas, not them. Always discuss the topic rather than the person. Personally attacking your opponent or audience will take credibility away from you.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-54&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=When%20You%20Disagree%20With%20Someone%2C%20Rebut%20Their%20Ideas%20Not%20Them.&time=1599005976396&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

56. Stand. Settle. Smile. When you take the stage, stand, settle in your place for a few seconds and then smile prior to speaking.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-55&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Stand.%20Settle.%20Smile.&time=1599005976397&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

57. Speak your needs. Don’t expect your audience, interviewer or club to guess what you want. Be candid and clear with your intentions.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-56&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Speak%20Your%20Needs.&time=1599005976397&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

58. Get rest. Nerves may keep you awake, but try to get an adequate amount of sleep prior to your speech to ensure optimal mental alertness.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-57&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Get%20Rest.&time=1599005976398&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

59. Avoid negative topics. Try to focus on positive or uplifting messages. While sometimes it’s necessary to speak to a negative topic, include positive ways the issue can be improved or resolved.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-58&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Avoid%20Negative%20Topics.&time=1599005976398&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

60. Smile and introduce yourself. Let the audience know who you are and why you should be speaking about this topic.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-59&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Smile%20and%20Introduce%20Yourself.&time=1599005976399&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

61. Practice eye contact. Practicing eye contact in all social situations will make it easier on stage. Practice eye contact with people you work with, the cashier at the grocery store, etc.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-60&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Practice%20Eye%20Contact.&time=1599005976399&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

62. Limit caffeine. Too much caffeine can make you shaky during your speech. Try to limit your caffeine intake the day of and night before your speaking engagement.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-61&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Limit%20Caffeine.&time=1599005976400&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters 

63. Don’t hide from your audience. Though you may be nervous, try not to stay behind a podium or hide behind your presentationhttps://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-62&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Don%27t%20Hide%20From%20Your%20Audience.&time=1599005976400&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

64. Use color. Mark your notes with colorful symbols that mean something to you.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-63&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Use%20Color.&time=1599005976401&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

65. Don’t alienate your audience. Be sure to arrive on time and speak to the topic promised.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-64&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Don%27t%20Alienate%20Your%20Audience.&time=1599005976401&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

66. Know your audience. Don’t approach your speech with a one size fits all. Use the internet to search about foreign countries and cultures where you will be speaking. This includes corporate cultures. Speak to your audience. Don’t confuse your audience by using technical jargon, industry jargon or complex statistics.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-65&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Know%20Your%20Audience.&time=1599005976404&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

67. Avoid speaking in monotone. Use inflection to signal significant points in your speech and keep the audience engaged.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-66&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Avoid%20Speaking%20in%20Monotone.&time=1599005976404&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

68. Free your hands. Freeing your hands to use gestures is one way to help eliminate filler words such as “umms” and “ahhhs”.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-67&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Free%20Your%20Hands.&time=1599005976405&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

69. Be succinct. Make every word of your speech count. Avoid talking just to “fill the air”.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-68&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Be%20Succinct.&time=1599005976405&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

70. Be open to evaluation. Evaluations help boost your confidence and provide tangible direction on how to improve. It’s a road map to get you where you need to go. (from the Toastmaster, August 2014, page 14)https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-69&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Be%20Open%20Evaluation.&time=1599005976406&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

71. Give evaluations. Evaluating other speakers in an opportunity to help others find their voice while strengthening your own in the process. (from the Toastmaster, August 2014, page 14)https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-70&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Give%20Evaluations.&time=1599005976406&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters 

72. Use blue note cards. Blue note cards are less distracting to an audience than white cards.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-71&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Use%20Blue%20Note%20Cards.&time=1599005976407&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

73. Join the online conversation. Follow Toastmasters International on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn, and interact with members from around the globe. Follow your own club’s and district’s social media pages too.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-72&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Join%20the%20Online%20Conversation.&time=1599005976407&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

74. Share the wealth. If you have a friend, family member or colleague who may benefit from Toastmasters, invite them to a meeting to check out the program.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-73&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Share%20the%20Wealth.&time=1599005976408&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

75. Start your journey. If you’re not currently working on the Communication or Leadership track as a Toastmaster, now is the perfect time to start. You’ll discover new confidence and self-empowerment as you reach your goals.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-74&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Start%20Your%20Journey.&time=1599005976408&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

76. Accept accolades. When you’re given a compliment or an award, it’s important to accept it graciously. The “Accepting an Award” speech assignment in the Special Occasion Speeches manual will help you master this.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-75&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Accept%20Accolades.&time=1599005976408&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

77. Step up. If you haven’t filled a certain meeting role in your club yet, make it a point to do so at an upcoming meeting. It will not only get you out of your comfort zone, you’ll better understand the overall club experience.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-76&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Step%20Up.&time=1599005976409&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

78. Chat with ease. If you feel nervous engaging in one-on-one conversations, you’re encouraged to attend club meetings and complete the “Conversing with Ease” assignment in the Interpersonal Communication manual.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-77&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Chat%20With%20Ease.&time=1599005976409&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

79. Manage your time. Serving as a timer at your club meetings and giving speeches with time limits will help you master time management skills that will help you in all areas of your life.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-78&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Manage%20Your%20Time.&time=1599005976409&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

80. Make them laugh. You may not have aspirations of being a stand-up comedian, but you can still learn to give humorous speeches. See the Entertaining Speaker Manual for guidance.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-79&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Make%20Them%20Laugh.&time=1599005976410&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

81. Speak your case. Sometimes public speaking has an audience of one, such as a traffic court judge or customer service representative. Presenting a well-organized argument can help you win your case. See the “Organize Your Speech” assignment in the Competent Communication manual for guidance.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-80&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Speak%20Your%20Case.&time=1599005976410&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

82. Keep the peace. As a leader, it’s essential to know how to diffuse conflict. See the “Defusing Verbal Communication” assignment in the Interpersonal Communication Manual to help you become a pro at conflict resolution.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-81&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Keep%20the%20Peace.&time=1599005976411&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

83. PREP (Point, Reason, Example, Point). Start your speech with a clear point. Explain your reason for choosing the subject. Illustrate your point with examples. End with a clear point that wraps up the speech.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-82&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=PREP%20(Point%2C%20Reason%2C%20Example%2C%20Point.&time=1599005976411&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

84. Give a top-notch toast. Stand up, raise your glass, speak from the heart, keep it brief, and stay focused on the person or event being honored.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-83&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Give%20a%20top-notch%20toast.&time=1599005976412&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

85. Tap into the past. If you’re interested in Toastmasters’ evolution over the past 90 years, visit our 90th anniversary page for videos, photos and resources.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-84&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Tap%20into%20the%20Past.&time=1599005976412&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

86. Use common language. Impress your audience through your presentation and mastery of your topic, not by using complicated words. For example: say “help” instead of “assist” or “use” instead of “utilize”.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-85&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Use%20Common%20Language.&time=1599005976413&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

87. Don’t get lost in translation. If you deliver a speech in your second (or even third) language, use humor, metaphor and analogy sparingly, as these don’t always translate well into other languages.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-86&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Don%27t%20Get%20Lost%20in%20Translation&time=1599005976413&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

88. Take jokes for a test drive. If you want to include a joke in your speech, write several options and test them out with your family, co-workers or club members to see how they are received.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-87&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Take%20Jokes%20for%20a%20Test%20Drive.&time=1599005976413&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

89. Use people’s names. People love to be addressed by their name in conversation. To help you remember someone’s name, be sure to say it back to them to verify you have it right, and try to use it several times to make it stick.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-88&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Use%20Peoples%20Names.&time=1599005976414&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

90. Keep a journal. When you get ideas for speech topics, jot them down in a journal so you have them to refer to when you’re tapped for ideas and need inspiration.https://platform.twitter.com/widgets/tweet_button.2d7d9a6d04538bf11c7b23641e75738c.en.html#dnt=false&hashtags=90Tips&id=twitter-widget-89&lang=en&original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&related=Toastmasters&size=m&text=Keep%20a%20Journal.&time=1599005976414&type=share&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toastmasters.org%2Fabout%2F90th-anniversary%2F90-tips&via=Toastmasters

Intellectual dark web


Mathews and old-ish wound.

LISTEN: BIG-WAVE STORYTELLER MARK MATHEWS ON THE INTELLECTUAL DARK WEB, KICKING OPIATES AND THE EXTRAVAGANCE OF EVIL, “THERE’S DARKNESS IN YOU AND IF YOU DON’T MANAGE YOUR LIFE AND FRAME IT WITH MEANING, YOU CAN BECOME BITTER… VERY FAST.”

Derek Rielly

By Derek Rielly

21 hours ago

Crippled innumerable times, told he’d never walk again, now a keynote speaker of considerable note…

Today’s guest on Dirty Water, Mark Mathews, presents, irresistibly, as a keynote speaker of considerable fame and even a little fortune who came from the bruising circuit of Maroubra, Sydney, via the cutthroat athleticism of professional big-wave surfing.

He is a ruminative man, as you’ll soon hear.

Give him one little opening for the point he wants to make and down he comes upon you, in under your guard, flashing and relentless as a rapier.

Mathews has been crippled and winged innumerable times,

Told he’ll never surf again,

Never walk again.

A cracked plate that can never be warmed on the stove nor brought out for company. Good only to hold crackers late at night or to go into the fridge under the leftovers.

But where a lesser man might sink into the velvet lazy chair of opiates and pity, descending, eventually, into a hell of despondency, he is optimism radiant and roaring.

Faith vindicated.

Atlas obscura newsletter


September 02, 2020

FROM THE ARCHIVESThe Box That Fell From the SkyIn 1962, in the woods outside Moncton, New Brunswick, David McPherson Sr. found a very large white box adorned with some very large lenses. McPherson had theories on what the box might be, but passed away without getting clear answers. It remained a mystery until 2017, when declassified CIA documents confirmed his suspicions.READ MORE →
SPONSORED BY COLE HAANOn the Run: NYCA run through New York City demands a delicate balance: Zoning out versus keeping your eyes peeled. Put on your running shoes and try this unique 5-stop route to discover a few gems of the city hidden in plain sight.LEARN MORE →
HELSINKI, FINLANDAsemapäällikönhovi BuildingThis building featuring Brutalist architecture has a rich media production history. It was home to a large television studio inaugurated by the Mayor of Helsinki in 1976, and in 1978, it produced the first subscription-based TV channel in Europe.READ MORE →
ATLAS OBSCURA EXPERIENCESFan Favorites WeekLed by some of the most fascinating experts and entertainers on the planet, our online experiences have explored everything from dinosaurs to art heists. Now, for one week starting September 21, we’re bringing back 10 of our best-selling, best-reviewed experiences. Whether it’s meeting the supernatural cats of Japan or learning how to harness the power of fermentation, there’s bound to be a unique experience for you to enjoy from home.LEARN MORE →
DIY Butterfly GardenWhen the world went into lockdown, many people turned to baking or gardening as an outlet. Rizwan Mithawala took it one step further—his lockdown project was to tend to a butterfly garden, eight floors up and not far from the busy Mohammed Ali Road in South Mumbai.READ MORE →
MANHATTAN, NEW YORKCity Hall StationThe first New York City subway opened on October 27, 1904, to the joy of New York elevated train and streetcar riders, and was lavished with fine architectural details, including glass tiles and large chandeliers. Its beauty couldn’t save it, however, and by 1945, it was abandoned.READ MORE →
Statue DebateIn 2020, the historic Shelbourne Hotel in Dublin, Ireland, removed four statues from their front entrance. These statues, sometimes referred to as the “Shelbourne Four,” depict two Egyptian women and two Nubian women. The response has been mixed: to some, two of the statues reference the transatlantic slave trade, in which Ireland was complicit. Others see them as purely an homage to 19th-century French art.READ MORE →
CEDAR, MICHIGANSugar Loaf Ski LodgeThis shuttered ski lodge is still filled with hastily-scribbled paperwork, snow-stained lift tickets, slightly-faded race bibs, and sun-washed vintage posters. It feels like it was instantly abandoned, leaving an ever-present snapshot of that moment in history.READ MORE →
Help Keep the World WondrousAtlas Obscura celebrates and supports the world’s hidden places and unique stories. Join the growing community that directly supports our mission by becoming a member today.LEARN MORE →

Chapter 12, Verse 13-14 – Bhagavad Gita, The Song of God – Swami Mukundananda


Bhagavad Gita: Chapter 12, Verse 13-14

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अद्वेष्टा सर्वभूतानां मैत्र: करुण एव च |
निर्ममो निरहङ्कार: समदु:खसुख: क्षमी || 13||
सन्तुष्ट: सततं योगी यतात्मा दृढनिश्चय: |
मय्यर्पितमनोबुद्धिर्यो मद्भक्त: स मे प्रिय: || 14||

adveṣhṭā sarva-bhūtānāṁ maitraḥ karuṇa eva cha
nirmamo nirahankāraḥ sama-duḥkha-sukhaḥ kṣhamī

santuṣhṭaḥ satataṁ yogī yatātmā dṛiḍha-niśhchayaḥ
mayy arpita-mano-buddhir yo mad-bhaktaḥ sa me priyaḥadveṣhṭā—free from malice; sarva-bhūtānām—toward all living beings; maitraḥ—friendly; karuṇaḥ—compassionate; eva—indeed; cha—and; nirmamaḥ—free from attachment to possession; nirahankāraḥ—free from egoism; sama—equipoised; duḥkha—distress; sukhaḥ—happiness; kṣhamī—forgiving; santuṣhṭaḥ—contented; satatam—steadily; yogī—united in devotion; yata-ātmā—self-controlled; dṛiḍha-niśhchayaḥ—firm in conviction; mayi—to me; arpita—dedicated; manaḥ—mind; buddhiḥ—intellect; yaḥ—who; mat-bhaktaḥ—My devotees; saḥ—they; me—to Me; priyaḥ—very dear

Translation

BG 12.13-14: Those devotees are very dear to Me who are free from malice toward all living beings, who are friendly, and compassionate. They are free from attachment to possessions and egotism, equipoised in happiness and distress, and ever-forgiving. They are ever-contented, steadily united with Me in devotion, self-controlled, firm in conviction, and dedicated to Me in mind and intellect.

Commentary

Having stated that devotion to His personal form is the best, Shree Krishna now goes on to explain in verses 13 to 19, the qualities of His loving devotees. 

Free from malice toward all living beings.  The devotees realize that all living beings are tiny parts of God.  If they harbor envy toward others, it is tantamount to harboring envy toward God Himself.  So the devotees are free from malice even toward those who are inimical toward them.

Friendly and compassionate.  Devotion engenders the feeling of unity amongst all living beings by virtue of their being children of the one God.  The notion of seeing others as alien to oneself is wiped out.  This leads to the growth of affability in the devotees and sympathy toward the sufferings of others.

Free from attachment to possessions and egotism.  The biggest enemy of devotion is pride.  One can only progress on the spiritual path if one practices self-effacement.  Proficient devotees naturally become humble and eliminate pride and proprietorship from their personality, as well as the false identification of being the body.

Equipoised in happiness and distress.  Devotees have faith that only efforts are in their hands, while the results are in the hands of God.  So whatever results come their way, they see them as the will of God, and accept them with equanimity.

Ever forgiving.  Devotees never think of punishing wrongdoers for their emotional satisfaction.  Harboring such negative thoughts toward others ruins one’s own devotion.  So accomplished devotees refuse to harbor unforgiving thoughts in all circumstances and leave the task of punishing wrongdoers upon God.

Ever contented.  Contentment comes not from increasing our possessions, but by decreasing our wants.  Devotees no longer look upon material objects as the source of pleasure, and thus are content with whatever they get. 

Steadily united with Me in devotion.  As explained previously, “Yog” means union.  Devotees are yogis because their consciousness is absorbed in God.  This absorption is not occasional or intermittent, but steady and constant because they are established in their relationship with God.

Self-controlled.  Devotees attach their mind to God in loving devotion.  It is thus detached from the world, and this gives them mastery over their mind and senses.

Firm in conviction.  The quality of determination comes from possessing a resolute intellect.  Since devotees tie their intellect to the knowledge of the scriptures and the instructions of the Guru, it becomes so resolute that even if the whole world tries to convince them otherwise, they do not budge an inch from their position.

Dedicated to Me in mind and intellect.  The soul is a servant of God by its inherent nature, and as we become enlightened with this knowledge, we naturally dedicate ourselves to the Supreme Lord.  In this surrender, the mind and intellect are of primary importance.  When they are devoted to God, the rest of the personality—body, working senses, knowledge senses, worldly possessions, and soul—naturally get dedicated in His service.  Shree Krishna says that devotees who exhibit these qualities are very dear to Him.

Random Phrases of the Day


  1. Wild Goose ChaseMeaning: Futilely pursuing something that will never be attainable.
  2. Put a Sock In ItMeaning: Asking someone to be quiet or to shut up.
  3. Plot Thickens – TheMeaning: A situation that has gotten way more serious or interesting due to recent complexities or developments.
  4. Right Out of the GateMeaning: Right from the beginning; to do something from the start.
  5. Lickety SplitMeaning: To go at a quick pace; no delaying!

Wisdom Quotes


Wisdom lies not in the answers one gives, but in the questions one asks.

It is not the answer that enlightens, but the question. (Eugene Ionesco)

Wisdom is not only defined by what you know, but also be knowing what you don’t.
To know what you know and what you do not know, that is true knowledge. (Confucius)

This tomb inscription has puzzled experts for a century


via This tomb inscription has puzzled experts for a century

 

August 28, 2020

The definitive guide to the world's hidden wonders.

Random paragraph


He watched as the young man tried to impress everyone in the room with his intelligence. There was no doubt that he was smart. The fact that he was more intelligent than anyone else in the room could have been easily deduced, but nobody was really paying any attention due to the fact that it was also obvious that the young man only cared about his intelligence.

ರಾಜ್ಯ ಸರ್ಕಾರದ ಪರವಾಗಿ ಪ್ರಣಬ್ ಮುಖರ್ಜಿ ಭಾವಚಿತ್ರಕ್ಕೆ ಪುಷ್ಪನಮನ ಸಲ್ಲಿಸಿದ ಶಂಕರಗೌಡ ಪಾಟೀಲ್ – Udayakala Kannada News Paper ಉದಯಕಾಲ ಕನ್ನಡ ದಿನಪತ್ರಿಕೆ


Thrive Global Daily Newsletter


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Tuesday, September 01, 2020
 
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How Breathing Exercises Can Help You Stay Calm During the Pandemic

When you’re feeling anxious, start by taking long, slow breaths.

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How Self-Compassion Can Make Us More Confident and Productive

It can completely change the way you feel about your work.

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How to Navigate the “Exploratory Phase” of Your Career Without Stress

Experts say that being unsure of your next move isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

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What I’ve Learned From Rediscovering a Childhood Hobby 

My mother’s routines taught me so much.

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The Power of Focusing on the Upside of Being Single

Taking time for introspection and self-discovery can be incredibly meaningful.

M O R E   G R E A T  R E A D S 

How Self-Compassion Can Make Us More Confident and Productive at Work

Why Adding a Human Layer Is the Key to the “Great Reset”

A Guide to Heading Back to School During a Pandemic

Yes, Climate Change Is a Water Crisis Too

What We Need to Remember When It Comes to Virtual Learning

I'm an image

In this episode of “Meditative Story,” concert pianist Lang Lang explores the mindset reframe that inspired his journey to becoming a true musician: that being a student of arts and culture is more important than hard work alone. Click here to listen and subscribe.

seth godin newsletter


A new normal

Time travelers should prepare for tough sledding. If you went back to 1820 or even 1920, all the sudden changes would discombobulate you. And the same is true for someone who came forward to today.

We’ve got a deep-seated desire for things to go back to normal, the way we were used to.

But this, this moment of ours is now normal.

For now.

And then, there will be another normal.

There is no “the new normal”. Because that’s definitive.

There’s simply the normal of now.

A new normal. This too shall pass.

Found: Israel’s oldest known soap factory


August 31, 2020

Olive Oil Soap FactoryIn the remnants of an ancient house in Rahat, a predominantly Bedouin city in what is now southern Israel, government archaeologists believe they have found the oldest known soap factory in the country. According to the Israel Antiquities Authority, the ruins are approximately 1,200 years old, dating to the early Islamic period when the region was ruled by the Abbasid Caliphate.READ MORE →
SPONSORED BY MORNING BREWStart Your Day RightThere’s a reason over 1.9 million people start their day with Morning Brew — the daily email that delivers the latest news from Wall Street to Silicon Valley. Business news doesn’t have to be dry and dense…make your mornings more enjoyable, for free. Check it out today.LEARN MORE →
HELLVIK, NORWAYHalvikhulaOn the shores of the Norwegian Sea lies Halvikhallen or Halvikhula (Hall of Halvik or Halvik Cave), known as Northern Europe’s largest cave. Its height stretches well over 300 feet (100 meters), and about 260 feet (80 meters) wide; one geological source from the late 19th century claims that the cave’s depth is well over 1,000 feet.READ MORE →
GASTRO OBSCURAFlavors of HistoryCan ice cream be educational? Hannah Spiegelman certainly thinks so. On her website, A Sweet History, Spiegelman uses the creamy, frozen treat to highlight historical events, people, and places, such as French resistance agent Josephine Baker, and Laika, the first living creature to orbit the earth. Dessert that enriches our appetites and our minds? Sign us up.READ MORE →
ATLAS OBSCURA EXPERIENCESDino-Themed Trivia NightOur trivia night is getting prehistoric. Join us for a dino-based online pub trivia with special guest, Dino101 host, Dustin Growick, and get ready to prove that you are the greatest dinosaur expert of all time.LEARN MORE →
Bat BaculaMany mammals, including bats, have a penis bone, also known as a baculum. In bats, many of these have distinctive shapes that can help researchers identify different genera and species. But it’s a delicate art to retrieve these bones: They’re typically roughly the size of a hyphen, and very easy to lose. (Tip: Do not take your eyes off them.)READ MORE →
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIAGriffith J. Griffith StatueIn 1882, Welsh immigrant and self-styled “Colonel” Griffith Jenkins Griffith bought Rancho Los Feliz, only to donate it in 1896, decreeing that it must be a place of recreation for residents. A 14-foot bronze statue of Griffith commemorates his donation, though it leaves out some of Griffith’s more scandalous escapades.READ MORE →
PARIS, FRANCEStatue of LibertyNo, that’s not a typo. France gave the U.S. the Statue of Liberty in 1886, and Americans repaid the favor by giving Paris a smaller version of the same statue in 1889. The gift both commemorated the centennial of the French Revolution, and served to reaffirm the dedication of both France and the United States to the republican ideal on which they were founded.READ MORE →
OXFORD, ENGLANDJ.R.R. Tolkien’s GraveThe final resting place of John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (1892–1973) and Edith Mary Tolkien (1889-1971) is covered in an abundance of flowers, plants, and offerings from fans in the verdant cemetery of Wolvercote in Northern Oxford. They are buried together in a single grave in the Catholic section of the cemetery.READ MORE →

Did you know…


Did you know…

… that today is American Chess Day? Played the world over by young and old alike, this two-player strategy board game is believed to be derived from the Indian game “chaturanga” sometime before the 7th century. Trivia fans: Chaturanga translates as “four divisions of the military”: infantry, cavalry, elephantry, and chariotry.