Did you know…


Did you know…

… that today is Listen to Some Beautiful Sounds Day? In 1862, French composer Claude-Achille Debussy was born in St. Germaine-en-Laye, France. He composed “Clair de Lune” and many other wonderful songs. Celebrate by… listening to some beautiful sounds!

Seth Godin Newsletter


Situational gravity

All of us are good at rationalizing. It helps us process the world, navigate our choices and live with ourselves.

But gravity doesn’t care if you got a lot of sleep last night or not. It’s still the same amount of force.

The pavement doesn’t care if you always wear a helmet on your bike, except just this one time when you didn’t, because you were having a video taken.

Melanoma doesn’t care that you always wear sun screen, except that one day when you were really busy and couldn’t go back to the house for it.

Outside forces don’t care about the situation, because they have no awareness or memory. They simply are.

Newton’s law doesn’t care that you were really distracted and that’s why you weren’t wearing a seatbelt, and the virus that infected your friend doesn’t care about why that person in the office decided not to wear a mask, either.

People are very good at stories. That’s our core technology. Everything else in the world, though, has no interest in them.

  

The opposite of confidence

It’s not anxiety.

And it’s not panic.

The opposite of confident is not confident. Unsure.

Being unsure can be healthy. It can help us focus on how we can make our work more likely to become the contribution we seek.

But anxiety and panic have nothing to do with an informed understanding of how the world is unfolding.

WORD OF THE DAY


WORD OF THE DAY
Jargoon
jar-GOON
Part of speech: noun
Origin: French, mid-18th century
1

A translucent, colorless, or smoky gem variety of zircon

Examples of Jargoon in a sentence

“I found the vintage jargoon brooch at my favorite antique store.”

“Even though it’s jargoon, it glitters like a diamond.”

Did you know…


Did you know…

… that today is Listen to Some Beautiful Sounds Day? In 1862, French composer Claude-Achille Debussy was born in St. Germaine-en-Laye, France. He composed “Clair de Lune” and many other wonderful songs. Celebrate by… listening to some beautiful sounds!.. that today is Listen to Some Beautiful Sounds Day? In 1862, French composer Claude-Achille Debussy was born in St. Germaine-en-Laye, France. He composed “Clair de Lune” and many other wonderful songs. Celebrate by… listening to some beautiful sounds!

Random Paragraph


“It was so great to hear from you today and it was such weird timing,” he said. “This is going to sound funny and a little strange, but you were in a dream I had just a couple of days ago. I’d love to get together and tell you about it if you’re up for a cup of coffee,” he continued, laying the trap he’d been planning for years.

Dinner Ideas



Garlic Basil Pizza

BASIL AND GARLIC WHITE PIZZA

Traditional pizza is always delicious, but there’s something about a cheese-filled white pizza that really hits the spot. Add on a slathering of garlic oil and plenty of basil and you’ll be in pizza heaven!

Overhead view of multiple slices of basil and garlic white pizza on a marble tray with recipe title at the bottom of the image

(This recipe for Basil and Garlic White Pizza was originally published in May 2012, but has been updated with new photos and content in 2018.)

File this under an actual conversation that really happened in real life:

Check-out boy at grocery store, ringing in my baby basil plant: Hey, I hear some people actually eat this stuff!

Me: Um, yes; it’s basil.

Check-Out Boy: Ew. It’s a plant.

Me: Yes, basil.

Check-Out Boy: If it grows in the ground, you won’t find me eating it!

Me: Like pretty much all vegetables? What about this pepper? (holding up a green bell pepper)

Check-Out Boy: That’s spicy, so it’s OK! But that (pointing at basil) is a plant and it has leaves. Why do I want to eat leaves?

Mediavine

Me: Because they taste good? And they’re healthy? Have you ever tried basil before?

Check-Out Boy: NO! I don’t eat plants!

At this point, I give up, collect my bags, and leave. LE SIGH.

And then I proceeded to go home and make a pizza with plants on it. Because I like plants. And also because I love white pizza and know it always tastes better with basil. And I figured I at least need one plant on this cheese-filled pizza. Grocery store boy doesn’t know what he’s missing out on.

WHAT IS WHITE PIZZA?

When we think of pizza, many of us think tomato sauce, mozzarella cheese, and maybe a topping like pepperoni, sausage, or basil. Of course, traditional pizza is delicious, but once you try white pizza, chances are you’ll be hooked!

White pizza is essentially pizza without tomato sauce and extra cheese instead, usually ricotta and mozzarella (sometimes they even involve alfredo sauce).

In my opinion, white pizzas often need a little something to add dimension to the cheese, which is why I use a garlic olive oil here plus lots of basil. The added parmesan cheese also adds a nice sharpness. I can pretty much promise you that you won’t be missing the tomato sauce at all!

WHAT KIND OF DOUGH IS BEST?

You can really use any pizza dough you want for this recipe, even store-bought. But I’m including the recipe for a whole wheat dough because I think it goes so perfectly with the pizza toppings.

I almost never make whole wheat dough for my pizza, but now that I’ve tried this half whole wheat dough, I feel like I’m going to be making it all the time. It is seriously so, so good!

I adapted the recipe from Jeff Hertzberg and Zoe Francois’s Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day (affiliate link), which is a must-have book for anyone interested in learning absolutely everything about pizza dough making (in case you don’t know Jeff and Zoe are Gods in the bread-making world).

You only need about 1/3 of this recipe for one pizza, but you can always put the leftover in the fridge for a few days (until you start craving another one of these!) or you can even freeze it for up to 3 months.

HOW TO MAKE BASIL AND GARLIC WHITE PIZZA

This white pizza is a pretty simple one, but one that is going to be on your mind for days after it’s long gone… It basically involves garlic, cheese, and basil. Hello, heaven.

Mediavine

To start, pre-heat oven to 450 degrees. Cover a 12-inch round pan with foil and lightly brush with 1 Tbsp olive oil. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough into a 12-inch round and place  on prepared pan.

Mix together minced garlic and 2 1/2 T extra-virgin olive oil in a small bowl. Using a pastry brush, brush dough with garlic olive oil mixture.

Layer slices of mozzarella on top of dough and spoon crumbles of ricotta cheese around. Cover pizza with 12 basil leaves and parmesan cheese shavings.

If you want to add additional toppings here, you certainly can. Anything works, but sausage or roasted chicken breast is especially delicious on white pizza! Also, if you’re feeling a little crazy, go for clams (white clam pizza is seriously to die for!)

Bake for about 18-22 minutes, until crust is browning and crispy.

Collage showing process for making pizza, including dough rolled out with garlic; mozzarella, ricotta, parmesan, and basil on dough; and pizza baked and just out of the oven

Call me crazy, but I love the little little burn marks on top of the cheese. Burnt cheese= best ever! I also love the combination of mozzarella, ricotta, and parmesan cheese. Give me all your cheese, people.

Mediavine

But also, give me all your garlic olive oil because I will drink that ish out of a water bottle. Isn’t “slathered in garlic” one of the best phrases ever? Garlic-slathered white pizza? Yes, please!

Overhead close-up of a slice of basil and garlic white pizza on a marble tray with other slices of pizza in the background

Don’t forget to chiffonade your leftover basil and sprinkle that around, as well. Basil baked at 450 degrees is nice and crispy and yummy, but fresh basil is even better. I feel like basil is one of those things you can enjoy year round and it will give you a little bit of summer happiness in the middle of winter.

Also, my grocery store sells basil plants almost all the time and how happy is it to have a basil plant in your kitchen in the middle of winter?

Landscape overhead view of multiple slices of basil and garlic white pizza on a marble tray
Mediavine

This partially whole wheat crust was honestly perfect. Delightfully chewy, but not overly so. Hearty without being heavy. And really, more satisfying than the typical all-purpose flour crust.

I’ve totally been back on my pizza-making game lately and I never want to stop. It feels like 2011 again. It’s super rare that I make tomato sauce-based pizzas, but I also haven’t made a white pizza in forever.

Overhead view of multiple slices of basil and garlic white pizza on a marble tray
Mediavine

Oh, grocery store checkout boy, how I wish I could have brought you a slice. Maybe then you could have seen how glorious plants are. And not just those “spicy” peppers that are actually bell peppers. Oh man, I fear that the youth of today is in serious trouble.

Do you love white pizza or are you more of a tomato sauce traditionalist? 

If you like this non-traditional pizza, check out my French Onion Soup Pizza and my Shrimp Scampi Pizza. Oh and for my fellow white pizza lovers, you have to try my Bacon White Pizza Dip! Oh, and I love the idea of burrata pizza like this one from Spices in my DNA.

Basil and Garlic White Pizza -- Traditional pizza is always delicious, but there's something about a cheese-filled white pizza that really hits the spot. Add on a slathering of garlic oil and plenty of basil and you'll be in pizza heaven | wearenotmartha.com

 Print Recipe

5 from 2 votes

Basil and Garlic White Pizza

Traditional pizza is always delicious, but there’s something about a cheese-filled white pizza that really hits the spot. Add on a slathering of garlic oil and plenty of basil and you’ll be in pizza heaven!
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Entree
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Healthier Pizza Dough, Unique Pizzas, White Pizza
Servings: 1 pizza
Author: Sues
Mediavine

Ingredients

  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 1/2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • Whole wheat pizza dough (1/3 of recipe below or you can use store-bought)
  • 8 oz. mozzarella cheese, cut into slices
  • 1/2 cup part-skim ricotta cheese
  • 15 basil leaves, divided
  • 1 oz. shaved parmesan cheese

Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

  • 1/2 Tbsp active dry yeast
  • 1 3/4 cup lukewarm water
  • 1/2 Tbsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp honey (can substitute with sugar)
  • 1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
Get IngredientsPowered by Chicory

Instructions

  • Pre-heat oven to 450 degrees. Cover a 12-inch round pan with foil and lightly brush with 1 Tbsp olive oil.
  • Mix together minced garlic and 2 1/2 T extra-virgin olive oil in a small bowl.
  • On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough into a 12-inch round and place  on prepared pan.
  • Using a pastry brush, brush dough with garlic olive oil mixture. Layer slices of mozzarella on top of dough and spoon crumbles of ricotta cheese around.
  • Cover pizza with 12 basil leaves and parmesan cheese shavings.
  • Bake for about 18-22 minutes, until crust is browning and crispy. Chiffonade remaining 3 basil leaves and sprinkle over the top.

Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

  • In a large bowl, combine yeast and water. Let sit for 3 minutes. Stir in salt, honey or sugar, and olive oil.
  • Using a wooden spoon, stir in whole wheat flour and all-purpose flour until just blended. If dough is still wet, add in a bit more flour, 1 Tbsp at a time.
  • Cover the bowl with a towel and set aside at room temperature for about two hours, so it can rise. Once risen, either use dough or refrigerate if not using right away.

Notes

  • Pizza dough recipe adapted from Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in 5 Minutes a Day.
  • Leftover dough can be wrapped tightly in plastic wrap and stored in fridge for 5 days.
  • You can also freeze it for up to three months. Just make sure to divide it into individual portions before freezing.
  • Feel free to add more toppings to this pizza before baking, including pepperoni, sausage, roasted chicken breast, etc.

RANDOM facts


  1. LegoLand Billund opened on the 7th June 1968, and attracted over 3,000 visitors on the first day!
  2. During 9/11, some fighters took off without live ammo, knowing that to stop the hijackers; the pilots might have to crash their fighters into the planes.
  3. There is a punctuation mark used to signify irony or sarcasm that looks like a backwards question mark ⸮

Random Paragraph -Writing Prompt


She had been told time and time again that the most important steps were the first and the last. It was something that she carried within her in everything she did, but then he showed up and disrupted everything. He told her that she had it wrong. The first step wasn’t the most important. The last step wasn’t the most important. It was the next step that was the most important.

Random Phrases of the day


  1. There’s No I in TeamMeaning: To not work alone, but rather, together with others in order to achieve a certain goal.
  2. Between a Rock and a Hard PlaceMeaning: Being faced with two difficult choices.
  3. Playing PossumMeaning: Pretending to be dead, or to be deceitful about something.
  4. Ride Him, Cowboy!Meaning: A cheer people yell, usually at rodeos when cowboys are clinging to the backs of untamed horses.
  5. Lovey DoveyMeaning: The affectionate stuff that people do when they are in love, such as kissing and hugging.

Random Facts


  1. While writing the famous song, “Hallelujah“, Leonard Cohen originally wrote 80 verses for the song which he sometimes interchanges in and out depending on where he’s playing.
  2. Selfies now cause more deaths than shark attacks. It is estimated there are 28 selfie related deaths per year, with the leading cause being heights.
  3. Sour Patch Kids are from the same manufacturer as Swedish Fish. The red Sour Patch Kids are the same candy as Swedish Fish, but with sour sugar.

Random Phrases of the day


  1. What Goes Up Must Come DownMeaning: Things that go up must eventually return to the earth due to gravity.
  2. Curiosity Killed The CatMeaning: Typically said to indicate that any further investigation into a situation may lead to harm.
  3. Every Cloud Has a Silver LiningMeaning: To be optimistic, even in difficullt times.
  4. Man of Few WordsMeaning: A person who does not speak a great deal; someone who talks with as few words as possible.
  5. Top DrawerMeaning: High quality, exceptional; something that’s very valuable.

Breakfast Ideas



French Apple Cinnamon Tart

rustic french apple tart

Tested & Perfected Recipes

When we think of French desserts, we usually imagine fancy pâtisseries with pyramids of pastel-colored macarons and glossy fruit tarts. But when the French bake at home, they keep it simple. One of my favorite food writers, Dorie Greenspan, wrote of her time living in France: “No matter how chic the hostess, her homemade dessert invariably looked as rustic as if it had come from a farmhouse grand-mère.”

The recipes are often centuries old and passed down through the generations. In fact, the recipes are so tried and true, she writes, “many French women make them without recipes, or au pif.” This free-form French apple tart is something the French might throw together au pif, or by feel. Like an apple pie without the pan, it consists of a thin layer of cinnamon-scented apples atop a buttery, flaky crust.

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I know the mere mention of a homemade pastry crust and rolling pin is enough to send some people running for the hills but, rest assured, this tart relies on a dough that’s virtually foolproof and easy to roll to out — and it comes together in a food processor in under a minute. And the beauty of a free-form tart is that you don’t have to fuss over crimping the dough into a pie plate: you simply fold it casually over the fruit. The charm of this dessert lies in its imperfections.

WHAT YOU’LL NEED TO MAKE A FRENCH APPLE TART

Before we get to the recipe, a word of advice: you might be tempted to load up the tart with extra apples but, trust me, less is more with this type of dessert. The apples release quite a bit of juice, which can leak from the tart and make a mess of the crust and your oven.

Also, be sure to use apples suitable for baking — think Fuji, Granny Smith, Jonagolds, Jonathans, Golden Delicious, Gala, Honey Crisp, etc. — otherwise, they’ll turn into applesauce.

HOW TO MAKE A FRENCH APPLE TART

how to make rustic apple tart

Begin by making the pastry: In a food processor fitted with the steel blade, combine the flour, salt and sugar. Pulse briefly to combine, then add the pieces of cold butter.

how to make rustic apple tart

Process just until the butter is the size of peas, about 5 seconds.

how to make rustic apple tart

Sprinkle the ice water over the mixture and process just until moistened and very crumbly, about 5 seconds.

how to make rustic apple tart

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface.

how to make rustic apple tart

Knead a few times, just until it comes together into a cohesive ball.

how to make rustic apple tart

Pat the dough into a disk.

how to make rustic apple tart

Flour your work surface again and dust the dough with flour, as well. Using a rolling pin, roll into a circle 8 to 10 inches in diameter, turning and adding more flour as necessary so the dough doesn’t stick. Transfer the dough to a parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate while you prepare the filling (you’ll roll the dough out further on the parchment paper so go ahead and clean your work surface).

how to make rustic apple tart

To make the filling: Peel, core, and cut the apples into 1/8-inch-thick slices (you should have about 4 cups) and place in a large bowl. Add the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, melted butter, and salt.

how to make rustic apple tart

Toss to combine.

how to make rustic apple tart

Take the dough from the fridge and slide the parchment paper onto the countertop. Roll the dough, directly on the parchment paper, into a 14-inch circle about 1/8 inch thick. It’s fine if the edges are a little ragged.

how to make rustic apple tart

Place the parchment and dough back on the baking sheet – the pastry should curve up the lip of the pan.

how to make rustic apple tart

Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of flour evenly over the pastry.

how to make rustic apple tart

Arrange the apple slices on top in overlapping concentric circles to within 3 inches of the edge. Don’t worry about making it look perfect! It doesn’t make much difference in the end and you don’t want the dough to get too warm.

how to make rustic apple tart

Fold the edges of the dough over the apples in a free-form fashion, working your way around and creating pleats as you go. Patch up any tears by pinching a bit of dough from the edge.

how to make rustic apple tart

Using a pastry brush, brush the pleated dough evenly with the beaten egg.

how to make rustic apple tart

Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the turbinado sugar over the top crust and 1 tablespoon over the fruit. Then chill the assembled tart in the fridge for 15 to 20 minutes while you preheat the oven.

how to make rustic apple tart

Bake for 55 to 65 minutes, or until the apples are tender and the crust is golden and cooked through. Transfer the pan to a rack and let cool. While the tart cools, make the optional glaze: mix the apricot jam with 1-1/2 teaspoons water in a small bowl. Heat in the microwave until bubbling, about 20 seconds. Then, using a pastry brush, brush the apples with the apricot syrup.

Use two large spatulas to transfer the tart to a serving plate or cutting board. Slice and serve warm or at room temperature. The tart is best served on the day it is made, but leftovers will keep, loosely covered on the countertop, for a few days.

rustic french apple tart

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Rustic French Apple Tart

Like an apple pie without the pan, this French apple tart consists of a thin layer of cinnamon-scented apples atop a buttery, flaky crust.

Servings: 8
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 1 Hour
Total Time: 1 Hour 30 Minutes, plus 20 minutes to chill

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE CRUST

  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, spooned and leveled
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1-1/2 sticks (12 tablespoons) very cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup very cold water

FOR THE FILLING

  • 1-3/4 lbs baking apples (3 large)
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

FOR ASSEMBLING & BAKING

  • 1 tablespoon all purpose flour
  • egg, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar
  • 1 tablespoon apricot jelly or jam, optional for glaze

INSTRUCTIONS

    1. Make the crust: Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a food processor fitted with the steel blade, combine the flour, salt and sugar. Pulse briefly to combine. Add the cold butter and process just until the butter is the size of peas, about 5 seconds. Sprinkle the ice water over the mixture and process just until moistened and very crumbly, about 5 seconds. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and knead a few times, just until it comes together into a cohesive ball. Pat the dough into a disk. Flour your work surface again and dust the dough with flour, as well. Using a rolling pin, roll into a circle 8 to 10 inches in diameter, turning and adding more flour as necessary so the dough doesn’t stick. Transfer the dough to the parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate while you prepare the filling (you’ll roll the dough out further on the parchment paper so go ahead and clean your work surface).
    2. Make the Filling: Peel, core, and cut the apples into 1/8-inch-thick slices (you should have about 4 cups) and place in a large bowl. Add the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, melted butter, and salt; toss to combine.
    3. Take the dough from the fridge and slide the parchment paper onto the countertop. Roll the dough, directly on the parchment paper, into a 14-inch circle about 1/8 inch thick. It’s fine if the edges are a little ragged. Place the parchment and dough back on the baking sheet – the pastry should curve up the lip of the pan.
    4. Assemble the tart: Sprinkle the flour evenly over the pastry. Arrange the apple slices on top in overlapping concentric circles to within 3 inches of the edge. Don’t worry about making it look perfect! It doesn’t make much difference in the end and you don’t want the dough to get too warm. Fold the edges of the dough over the apples in a free-form fashion, working your way around and creating pleats as you go. Patch up any tears by pinching a bit of dough from the edge.
    5. Using a pastry brush, brush the pleated dough evenly with the beaten egg. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the turbinado sugar over the top crust and 1 tablespoon over the fruit. Chill the assembled tart in the fridge for 15 to 20 minutes.
    6. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°F and set an oven rack in the center position.
    7. Bake for 55 to 65 minutes, or until the apples are tender and the crust is golden and cooked through. (It’s okay if some of the juices leak from the tart onto the pan. The juices will burn on the pan but the tart should be fine — just scrape any burnt bits away from the tart once it’s baked.) Transfer the pan to a rack and let cool.
    8. While the tart cools, make the optional glaze. In a small bowl, mix the apricot jam with 1-1/2 teaspoons water. Heat in the microwave until bubbling, about 20 seconds. Using a pastry brush, brush the apples with the apricot syrup.
    9. Use two large spatulas to transfer the tart to a serving plate or cutting board. Slice and serve warm or at room temperature. The tart is best served on the day it is made, but leftovers will keep, loosely covered on the countertop, for a few days.
    10. Make Ahead: The dough can be made up to 3 days in advance and refrigerated. Allow it to sit at room temperature for about 15 minutes or until pliable before rolling.
  1. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: The assembled tart may be frozen for up to 3 months. To freeze, place the baking sheet in the freezer until the tart is frozen, then wrap tightly. (Wait until right before baking the tart to brush the beaten egg and sprinkle the sugar onto the crust.) Bake directly from the freezer. (It may take a few extra minutes to bake from frozen.)

NUTRITION INFORMATION

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Wisdom Quotes


The way you affect those around you is perhaps the most important question in life.
Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?’ (Martin Luther King, Jr.)
==========
The intelligent know to belief only half of what they hear. The wise know which half.
An intelligent man believes only half of what he hears, a wise man knows which half. (Even Esar)

Seth Godin Newsletter


Toward a Zoom agreement

If you promise not to check your email while we’re talking, we promise to not waste your time.

If you agree to look me in the eye and try to absorb the gist of what I’m saying, I agree to be crisp, cogent and on point.

If you are clear about which meetings are a waste of time for you to attend, we can be sure to have them without you.

If you can egg me on and bring enthusiasm to the interaction, I can lean into the work and reflect back even more energy than you’re contributing.

The purpose of a meeting is not to fill the allocated slot on the Google calendar invite. The purpose is to communicate an idea and the emotions that go with it, and to find out what’s missing via engaged conversation.

If we can’t do that, let’s not meet.

Multi-tasking isn’t productive, respectful or healthy.

WORD OF THE DAY


WORD OF THE DAY
Codex
KOH-deks
Part of speech: noun
Origin: Latin, late 16th century
1

An ancient manuscript text in book form.

2

An official list of medicines, chemicals, etc.

Examples of Codex in a sentence

“The library had a prize collection of ancient books, including a codex that couldn’t be found anywhere else.”

“The codex will serve as an inventory for the storeroom.”

Did you know…


Did you know…

… that today is National Senior Citizens Day? On this day, we are encouraged to show appreciation for contributions of the elderly to home, family and society. If you are a senior citizen, enjoy your day any way you desire. After all, this is your day! Make sure to take advantage of senior citizens’ specials and discounts. There’s bound to be plenty offers today. 😉

Atlas ObscuraNewsletter


 

August 21, 2020

Matt Walker: How sleep can improve your immunity | TED Talk


via Matt Walker: How sleep can improve your immunity | TED Talk

One of the best things that you can do to boost your immune system is head to bed, says sleep scientist Matt Walker. It can even make your flu shot more effective!

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Matt Walker · Sleep scientist, professor, author

Matt Walker is a brain scientist trying to understand why we sleep.

MORE RESOURCES

Madame Gandhi: Stop dancing to the sound of your oppression | TED Talk


via Madame Gandhi: Stop dancing to the sound of your oppression | TED Talk

Popular music is often riddled with misogynistic lyrics that objectify and demean women … so why are we listening and dancing to it? Performing a sample of her original song “Top Knot Turn Up” and sharing clips from her female-directed music video of “See Me Thru,” activist and musician Madame Gandhi explains why she’s making sex-positive music that doesn’t contribute to anyone’s oppression — and calls on music lovers to get down to tunes that empower everyone.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Madame Gandhi · Activist, musician

TED Fellow Kiran Gandhi, who performs as Madame Gandhi, elevates and celebrates the female voice.

Improve Your Culinary Skills With These Cooking Terms | Word Genius


via Improve Your Culinary Skills With These Cooking Terms | Word Genius

Words for Cutting Techniques

Dice

To dice food is to finely chop it into small cubes. Onions and other vegetables are often diced for even cooking. “Dice” is also the plural for “die,” the small cube with numbered sides featured in countless board games. The gaming term came around in the early 14th century, and the culinary cousin popped up that same century.

Mince

Mincing is also the act of chopping food into small pieces, although without the emphasis on the cube shape. This one came from the Latin minutiæ, meaning small bits. The increment of time, 1/60 of an hour, also comes from this tiny Latin word.

Words for Cooking Techniques

Sauté

Chefs who let their food sizzle in a pan before tossing it into the air are well versed in the art of sautéing. It is the jumping that defines this method, as the direct translation of the French word sauté into English is “jump up.” This method and term has been used in cooking since the 1820s.

Roast

Simply enough, to roast is to cook in a dry heat. This word came from the old French rostir, which meant to roast or burn, and has been in use since the early 13th century.

Bake

Ancient Egyptian bakeries have been discovered by archaeologists, so this is probably the oldest method on the list. Technically similar to roasting, the old English bacan meant to cook by dry heat in a closed place or on a heated surface. Note: Bacan became bake, but not bacon (which comes from German for “back”).

Words for Flavoring Food

Glaze

A glaze is a shiny (and usually sweet) coating added to meat, vegetables, or desserts. The noun came from the verb — to glaze. The first people to glaze something were 14th-century glass workers, who used the middle English word glasen, which meant to fit with glass or to make shine. When glazing ham, we are talking about using honey and not glass.

Season

The noun “season” (winter, spring, etc.) is quite different from the cooking verb “season” (to improve flavor by adding spices); however, the two have entangled histories. The verb is from the 1300s old French assaisoner, which meant to ripen or season. However, the modern English is a combination of that word, and the concept of fruit becoming tastier as it ripens, like time passing through seasons.

AEON+PSYCHE Newsletter I like


This week in
Friday 21 August 2020
Thinkers and theories Essay
The semi-satisfied life
by David Bather Woods
Engineering Essay
Uncertain times
by Jessica Flack and Melanie Mitchell
Money and economics Idea
Why efficiency is dangerous and slowing down makes life better
by Barry Schwartz
Parenting and families Idea
Philosophy can explain what kind of achievement it is to give birth
by Fiona Woollard
by Sam Dresser
The ancient world Video
Haunting dispatches from the edge of the Roman Empire, just before its collapse
15 minutes
Architecture Video
Surreal, audacious, unfinished – the Sagrada Família remains a divine work in progress
6 minutes
Illness and disease Essay
No rest
by Alicia Puglionesi
Archaeology Essay
Accumulation and its discontents
by Astrid Van Oyen
Hallucinations/ delusions Idea
Beliefs have a social purpose. Does this explain delusions?
by Anna Greenburgh
Sports and games Idea
What pro wrestling can teach us about the quest for truth
by Douglas Edwards
Mathematics Video
This puzzle is impossible – but working out why is its own brain-teaser
19 minutes
Love and friendship Editors’ pick Video
An 11-year-old girl on what to do when a boy likes you, but you like someone else
2 minutes
Architecture Film Video Icon
An elegy and a celebration of what it really means to find a home
16 minutes