2. National Doctor’s Day – 1st July


2. National Doctor’s Day – 1st July This day is celebrated to recognize the contributions of doctors to individual lives and communities. Content marketing ideas:     Listicle idea: Courses apart from MBBS that one can do to work in the medical field Infographic idea: Here’s how to show gratitude to doctors for working through COVID-19 Video idea: How PPEs are saving … Continue reading 2. National Doctor’s Day – 1st July

1. GST Day – 1st July


This day marks the anniversary of the implementation of the Goods and Services Tax. Content marketing ideas:     Listicle idea: Here’s how you can get a GST code for your business Infographic idea: How can you calculate the applicable GST? Video idea:  X Products slapped with the highest GST Podcast idea: How has GST changed the tax system? Brand … Continue reading 1. GST Day – 1st July

startups.com Newsletter


At EU-Startups we're pretty busy finishing up our in-depth report about European AI startups, which we'll publish on Thursday. We've been screening through 500+ early-stage AI startups to make sure we'll present you the crème de la crème of artificial intelligence startups in Europe. Oh, and on Friday of this week we'll release the first episode of … Continue reading startups.com Newsletter

Did you know…


... that today is Changing of the Guard Day? In 2000, Capt. Cynthia Anderson became the first woman to stand guard at Buckingham Palace when she led a company of Australian soldiers to temporarily take over protection of the palace from the usual all-male British guard. It was a true changing of the guard! 😉

WORD OF THE DAY


WORD OF THE DAY Toothsome TOOTH-səm Part of speech: adjective Origin: English, mid-16th century 1 (of food) temptingly tasty. 2 (of a person) good-looking; attractive. Examples of Toothsome in a sentence "The dessert case was bursting with toothsome pastries and pies." "Look beyond his toothsome exterior and get to know his personality a bit."

Strategy+Business newsletter


Ideas that work June 30, 2020 A dramatic example of adopting best practices George Bernard Shaw’s 1905 play Major Barbara, the best stage drama written about business, has lessons that resonate with today’s audiences. by Daniel Akst “I Forgot I Was in a Zoom Room” If you haven't explored our live online course offerings yet, now's … Continue reading Strategy+Business newsletter

Be Kind


1. Donate coloring books and crayons to the children’s hospital. 2. Leave some extra quarters in the laundry room. 3. Shovel your neighbor's driveway and sidewalk. 4. Volunteer at the soup kitchen or animal shelter. 5. When drivers try to merge into your lane, let them in with a wave and a smile

Quo


in statu quo [ in stah-too kwoh; English in stey-tyoo kwoh, stach-oo ]SHOW IPA adverb Latin. in the state in which (anything was or is). DEFINITION FOR QUO (3 OF 8) locus in quo [ loh-koo s in kwoh; English loh-kuh s in kwoh ]SHOW IPA noun Latin. the place in which; the very place; the scene of the event. DEFINITION FOR QUO (4 OF 8) quid pro quo [ kwid proh kwoh ]SHOW IPA noun, plural quid pro quos, quids pro quo. … Continue reading Quo

6 Foreign Expressions You Should Know


6 Foreign Expressions You Should Know By Daniel Scocco Whether you like it or not, foreign expressions represent an integral part of the English language (and of many other languages, too). Knowing the meaning and usage of the most used ones is very important. First of all because it will enable you to understand pieces … Continue reading 6 Foreign Expressions You Should Know

77 Latin Words, Abbreviations, and Expressions That You Should Know


via 77 Latin Words, Abbreviations, and Expressions That You Should Know 10 Posted on: 07-18-2013 by: Brian Wasko Who says Latin is a dead language? It’s true that no country speaks Latin anymore, but thousands of English words have Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes. More than that, Latin words, expressions, and abbreviations are part of everyday English, particularly … Continue reading 77 Latin Words, Abbreviations, and Expressions That You Should Know

Know Thy Classics: Greek and Latin Phrases


Know Thy Classics: Greek and Latin Phrases Most often, Greek and Latin phrases occur in specific contexts, such as law and science. Here’s a list of some useful phrases: Hoi polloi: the common people (from Greek “the many,” often used in disparagement) Flagrante delicto: in the act (from Latin “while the crime is blazing”) Memento mori: … Continue reading Know Thy Classics: Greek and Latin Phrases

Apple-Polishers: Idioms Using Nouns


Apple-Polishers: Idioms Using Nouns A number of useful adages employ nouns. Here are some examples: Albatross: a constant, heavy burden (from Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”) Apple of discord: cause of dispute (from the golden apple tossed by Eris, goddess of discord, that initiated events leading to the Trojan War) Sour grapes: criticism of … Continue reading Apple-Polishers: Idioms Using Nouns

German words and phrases that appear in English texts tend to refer to literary and philosophical idea


German words and phrases that appear in English texts tend to refer to literary and philosophical ideas. Here’s a short list: Doppelgänger: a look-alike, double, or alter ego (literally “double goer”) Flak: heavy criticism or opposition (from the bursting shells fired by FLiegerAbwehrKanone, an antiaircraft gun) Schadenfreude: joy over someone’s misfortunes (literally “damage joy”) Wunderkind: a … Continue reading German words and phrases that appear in English texts tend to refer to literary and philosophical idea

Tantalizing list of words.


English contains a surprising number of vocabulary words whose origin can be traced back to classical mythology and history. Here’s a tantalizing list: Colossal: hugely, incredibly enormous (from the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the seven wonders of the ancient world) Hector: to bully or swagger (what Hector did to Achilles in the Iliad) Hermaphrodite: having both male and female … Continue reading Tantalizing list of words.

Words that Lead to Rome


Words that Lead to Rome English literary allusions owe an equal debt to Latin and Roman culture. Follow this rubric to learn more: Janus-faced: hypocritical (from Janus, the two-faced god; January is named for him) Jovial: cheerful (from Jove, a name for Jupiter, seen as a source of happiness) Martial: warlike (from Mars, the god of war) … Continue reading Words that Lead to Rome

The Testament of English


The Testament of English The Bible has exerted an equal presence in the English language. It would be prodigal not to learn as many Biblical allusions as you can. Here is a brief list: Babel: confusion of sounds (from the Tower of Babel) Golgotha: a place of great suffering (from Golgotha or Calvary) Gospel: an idea that’s … Continue reading The Testament of English

The Rest of the Story


The English language also draws liberally from other important pieces of literature. Here is a brief list: Faustian: seeking pleasure with no concern for future costs (from Faust, who sold his soul to the Devil in exchange for knowledge and power) Gargantuan: incredibly huge (from Rabelais’ Gargantua and Pantagruel) Lilliputian: small or petty (from Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels)

30 Latin Phrases So Genius You’ll Sound Like a Master Orator


30 Latin Phrases So Genius You'll Sound Like a Master Orator FORGET CARPE DIEM. START DROPPING CARPE VINUM INSTEAD. By SARAH CROW AUGUST 16, 2018 While Latin hasn't been regularly spoken or written for hundreds of years, save for the occasional scholarly text, its legacy is still felt throughout the lexicon of both Romance and Germanic languages today. Whether … Continue reading 30 Latin Phrases So Genius You’ll Sound Like a Master Orator

30 Words That Will Make You Sound Smarter (But Not Pretentious)


30 Words That Will Make You Sound Smarter (But Not Pretentious) LET THESE MELLIFLUOUS WORDS ROLL OFF YOUR TONGUE. By BOB LARKIN AUGUST 21, 2017 Let's get one thing clear right up front: Just randomly using big words so other people think you're smart isn't going to work. As a 2012 Princeton study found, it can have the … Continue reading 30 Words That Will Make You Sound Smarter (But Not Pretentious)

30 Words That Have Different Meanings Throughout the U.S.


30 Words That Have Different Meanings Throughout the U.S. "CAN I HAVE SOME POP, POP?" By MORGAN GREENWALD AUGUST 2, 2018 It's safe to say that, in the English language, some words have definitive meanings no matter where you are. A "stop" sign brings you to a halt and a "we're closed" one means you're not … Continue reading 30 Words That Have Different Meanings Throughout the U.S.

19 Fancy Menu Phrases Everyone Should Know


19 Fancy Menu Phrases Everyone Should Know NEVER STUTTER AT YOUR SNOOTY WAITER AGAIN. By BEST LIFE EDITORS NOVEMBER 16, 2017 In theory, a restaurant menu is like a road map: Study it carefully, and you won't have to ask anyone for directions—least of all that theatric waiter in the white apron. But sometimes you make … Continue reading 19 Fancy Menu Phrases Everyone Should Know