WORD OF THE DAY


WORD OF THE DAY
Pantheon
PAN-thee-ahn
Part of speech: noun
Origin: Greek, 14th century
1

A group of particularly respected, famous, or important people.

2

All the gods of a people or religion collectively.

Examples of Pantheon in a sentence

“Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, and Patsy Cline are original members of the pantheon of female country musicians.”

“The vase up for auction displayed the deities of the Greek pantheon.”

Forbes Careers Newsletter


Forbes
Layoffs are difficult under normal circumstances, let alone when entire organizations are working from home and practicing social distancing—forcing many companies to take to Zoom to deliver the news. While there’s no doubting just how devastating it can feel to be laid off, conversations like these are among the toughest any manager will have over the course of his or her career. If you find yourself in the position of having to make such a call while remote, take these four steps.

For starters, take a personal approach. These days, every communication you have with staff requires a sensitive touch, and this conversation is no different. Take time to think through the most delicate way to deliver the news to each employee. And remember, they will have questions—make sure you have the answers.

And here’s more on everything you need to know about working from home during the coronavirus pandemic.

Vicky Valet Vicky Valet

Deputy Editor

For more on working and leading from home, check out our guide, updated daily.
Six Ways To Overcome Distractions While Telecommuting
Six Ways To Overcome Distractions While Telecommuting
Whether you’re working alone in a studio apartment or alongside another telecommuter in a three-bedroom house, it’s unlikely that your setup is devoid of distractions. These tips can help you keep your eye on the prize.
Here’s How To Get Started →
The Telecommuter’s Toolkit
When was the last time you felt inspired—not just interested, but really moved to do and be more? Inspiration is a powerful feeling, one that can improve your outlook and sense of purpose. With this four-step mindfulness reflection, you’ll be that much closer to your next “aha” moment.

Delegating doesn’t have to be difficult. To do it successfully while remote, and without micromanaging, start by delegating the what, not the how. Here’s your playbook.

Everyone makes mistakes, even leaders. What matters is what comes next. Own your missteps and maintain your employees’ confidence by heeding this advice.

The Break Room
Get a taste of a new culture from the comfort of your kitchen by whipping up some of the world’s most delicious street foods, from Salvadoran pupusas to Ugandan rolex.
The Best Wine Subscription Services
The Best Wine Subscription Services
Whether you’re a casual drinker or serious collector, there’s a lot to be said for the convenience of having wine delivered right to your door.
See The Top 14 →
Forbes Advisor: You’ve read that the U.S. is facing an economic recession, but do you know how a recession is defined? Here, we break down the basics.

Seth Godin Newsletter


 

Pique blindness

If you can study something behavioral on college students, you can bet it gets studied a lot. It’s easy and cheap to run these sorts of tests. Which is how we came to understand the power of pique and the risk of habituation.

It turns out that if you see something over and over again, you start to ignore it. And so marketers of all stripes work to pique your interest by making funky little adjustments. They’ll change the speed limit to 57, or hang a sign upside down. In one study, they found that a scientist dressed as a panhandler raised more money when he asked for 37 cents instead of a quarter. (No word about what happens when a panhandler dresses like a scientist.) And so, selfish marketers will put ʇuǝƃɹn in the subject line of an email that couldn’t be less urgent…

This leads to pique blindness.

Just as bright white snow can overwhelm our retina so we can’t see very well, all of this pique to fight habituation has a downside. It’s creating a culture of hustle and noise that only gets worse. Because then people start using pique blindness as an excuse for ever more pique.

One of the real dangers of pique blindness is that we’ll only end up seeing drama, breaking news and the crisis of the moment. The first thing we need to do is not bite the hook. Refuse to reward anyone or anything that uses pique to get your attention. Turn up the filters and walk away. The important stuff will get through even if we filter out some of the urgent.

Even more important: as Joni said, “you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone.” Maybe what we need to do is invest daily effort in creating pique around the good things, the important things, the things we treasure. It could be as simple as breaking our pattern, coming up with a new way to walk the dog or greet a friend… It might involve breaking a habit in which a delight has become nothing much more than a comfort.

Everyone gets 24 hours of fresh attention, refilled daily. But if we continue to abuse it, we won’t be able to see with fresh eyes and appreciate what’s been there all along.

HT to Simon Sinek for the pique.

RANDOM Phrases


  1. Cry Over Spilt MilkMeaning: It’s useless to worry about things that  already happened and cannot be changed.
  2. Elvis Has Left The BuildingMeaning: Something that is all over.
  3. Jaws of LifeMeaning: Usually this references a tool used by rescuers when they pry or cut open a car to save the occupant.

Facts


  1. In the Philippines, you can buy spaghetti at McDonald’s, where they also sell a “McDo” piece of chicken.
  2. “Darth Vader” is derived from Old Dutch, meaning “Dark Father”.
  3. Gaming-related accidents increased by 26.5% during the first 5 months of Pokémon Go being released. This included 2 deaths and $25.5 million in damages.

Random Acts of Kindness


1. Give a restaurant or coffee gift card to someone (bank cashier, postal worker, homeless person, or random stranger).
2. If you see someone with their tail light or brake lights out, let them know.
3. Pick up litter and be kind to our environment.
4. Take a roll of quarters to the laundromat and leave enough for one wash/dry at some of the stations.
5. Teach Your Children to Recycle

Check this out from The Times of India


Covid-19 cases in India cross 1 lakh mark, over 3,000 dead
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/covid-19-cases-in-india-cross-1-lakh-mark-over-3000-dead/articleshow/75816534.cms?utm_campaign=andapp&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=native_share_tray
Download the TOI app now:
https://timesofindia.onelink.me/efRt/installtoi

Wisdom Quotes 7


It is not the absence of fear that is courage, but the mastery over it.
Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear. (Mark Twain)
==========
It’s the things and people someone loves that tells you who they are.
The things that we love tell us what we are. (Thomas Aquinas)

FS | BRAIN FOOD Newsletter I like


FS | BRAIN FOOD

Hey Dhananjay,

Here is your weekly FS Brain Food Newsletter — a timeless signal in a world full of noise.

FS

“We’ll be in a better position if we can face possible threats with a calm mind, alert to our internal signals but not anticipating every possible bad thing that could happen. While being told to stop panicking never helped anyone, we benefit by understanding that being overwhelmed by fear will hurt us more. Our imaginary fears harm us more than reality ever does.”

— Rethinking Fear

  • People are loving the excerpts from The Great Mental Models volumes One and Two that we’re posting on Instagram. (Click here to be notified when hardcovers are back in stock on Amazon.)

THE KIDS ARE IN CHARGE

Our pop-up school aimed at kids in grades 3-6 continues to host amazing guest lectures for kids. Adults love it too. We post all the lectures on the school’s YouTube channel. This week Scott Young taught us how to learn, Biz Stanford introduced us to UX, and Brad Stulberg offered some thoughts on writing. We are so fortunate to have such wonderful speakers and I’m happy we can share them with the world.

THE KNOWLEDGE PROJECT

Brian Koppelman, writer and director of the hit TV series Billions, talks about his career ups and downs, dealing with fear, and learning to live a meaningful life.

“All of us … are afraid of exposing that part of ourselves that we hold most dear for fear that it will be rejected. But the artist has a duty to risk that. And it’s a duty to risk it so that you’re able to be better.”

— Listen to What Really Matters on AppleSpotifyYouTube, or FS.

READ

“In the theater, what it means to give a powerful performance is to accept and own the truth of what it means to be a human being: to be strong and weak, accomplished and fallible, powerful and powerless, all at once. This, actually, is the challenge that professional actors face every time they get in character. To play any part authentically, an actor must accept the character without judgment. And this is true for the rest of us as well. By accepting that each of us is all of these things, by learning to value all of these truths and show all of these sides of ourselves when appropriate, and by handling our mistakes with grace and equanimity, we become more resilient, less ruled by shame and self-loathing, and, ultimately, more powerful. Ironically, this is where authenticity comes from: not trying to be more yourself, but learning to accept more of yourself.”

— Deborah Gruenfeld in Acting With Power

EXPLORE

1.

“[M]y worry is that … you won’t put enough really excellent stuff into your brain. I’m talking about what you might call the “theory of maximum taste.” This theory is based on the idea that exposure to genius has the power to expand your consciousness. If you spend a lot of time with genius, your mind will end up bigger and broader than if you spend your time only with run-of-the-mill stuff. The theory of maximum taste says that each person’s mind is defined by its upper limit—the best that it habitually consumes and is capable of consuming. … In college, you get assigned hard things. You’re taught to look at paintings and think about science in challenging ways. After college, most of us resolve to keep doing this kind of thing, but we’re busy and our brains are tired at the end of the day. Months and years go by. We get caught up in stuff, settle for consuming Twitter and, frankly, journalism. Our maximum taste shrinks. Have you ever noticed that 70 percent of the people you know are more boring at 30 than they were at 20?.”

— A Commencement Address Too Honest to Deliver in Person

2.

“But what I’ve seen to set apart great teams from good is a brutal focus on prioritization. This means generating an absurd amount of ideas and throwing 99% of them out of the window, to focus on the 1% that have the highest impact.”

— Erik Bernhardsson (Complement with Steve Jobs)

3.

“One great portfolio manager I know told the story of being driven somewhere by an analyst on a rainy night when a truck swerved and almost ran them off the road. “Why is stuff like this always happening to me?” the analyst instinctively responded. But to the portfolio manager, that response reflected a terrible mindset, whether on the road or in the market: a sense that the world is acting on you as opposed to your acting on the world. It is a mindset that is hard to change. But from what I’ve seen, great investors don’t have it. Instead, they’ve come to understand which factors in the market they can control and which factors they cannot.”

— Graham Duncan (Complement with It’s All Your Fault)

WHAT I’M THINKING ABOUT

Asking myself “is this helping me get what I want” is becoming one of my favorite questions.

It works on kids too. Mine are 11 and soon to be 10. Whenever they start fighting, I ask them, “Is this helping you get what you want?” and it gives them the power to remember what they are really trying to accomplish. “You can argue with your brother about whether it’s a chair or a stool, or you can get what you want.”

Don’t lose sight on what you want to achieve. Every action is a step toward or away from you what you want.

18. World Bee Day – 20th May


18. World Bee Day – 20th May

Bee Day Content Marketing Opportunities

This day is celebrated to raise awareness of the importance of pollinators, the threats they face, and their contribution to sustainable development.

Content marketing opportunities:   

  • Listicle idea: X Ways in which bees enrich our lives
  • Infographic idea: Cartoons/movies about bees your kids can watch
  • Video idea: What would happen in a world with no bees?
  • Podcast idea: Is honey vegan or not?

Brand campaign that worked:

This informative video from national geographic explores the different jobs that bees do – from the queen to the nurses and workers – and the role they play in the functioning of a beehive.