The roots of writing lie in hopes and dreams, not in accounting | Aeon Essays


via The roots of writing lie in hopes and dreams, not in accounting | Aeon Essays

A situation vs a slog: Via Seth Godin Newsletter


A situation vs a slog

“Wake me when it’s over,” is a natural instinct during a short-term interruption in our usual pattern. A crisis is there to be managed or waited out. The goal of each day is to simply get through it. Until things are back to normal.

But sometimes we’re dealing with a slog. Where the number of days is not small enough to simply throw them away. In a slog, the pattern of only getting by undervalues our days and diminishes our ability to contribute.

During a slog, we have a chance to accept a new normal, even if it’s temporary, and to figure out how to make something of it. You don’t have to wish for it, but it’s here. There’s very little value in spending our time nostalgic for normal.

When we get to the other side of the slog and look back, what will we have contributed, learned and created?

MiG: 482 of 872 MiGs procured since 1966 have crashed: Antony – The Economic Times


via MiG: 482 of 872 MiGs procured since 1966 have crashed: Antony – The Economic Times

How many more young Pilot’s lives are required before Government will put these Antique, Relics into museums ?

Shame that some politicians made lobbying/ commission money on sale of these aircrafts to India.

 

The downside of authority


A friend writes, “it is so frustrating not being able to control people.”

Of course, there’s a flipside.

If you could control people, just imagine how heavy that responsibility would weigh on you.

Freedom of choice brings with it the realization that our choices belong to us. One is the choice to lead. The other is the choice to follow.

If we make the choice to lead, we need to be prepared to own the consequences of our leadership, even (or especially) if we can’t actually control what others do.

Futurism Newsletter


84b086db-c1b2-4e8f-bd12-d446f884c986.png

The Future Is Littered With Black Holes

6 MAY 2020

TOP STORY

Astronomers Find Nearest Black Hole to Earth, and It’s Strange

Astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) claim to have spotted the closest known black hole to Earth.

The black hole is only 1,000 light-years from Earth — so close, the system it’s in can be seen in the southern hemisphere’s night sky with the naked eye, according to the researchers.

READ MORE 

HEADLINES FROM TODAY

ONEAstronomers Discover Brown Dwarf Covered in Stripes

READ MORE 

TWOElon Musk’s Strange Baby Name May Be Illegal

READ MORE 

THREEScientists Create Jet Engine Powered by Only Electricity

READ MORE 

FOURMIT Invents $6 COVID-19 Test Using CRISPR

READ MORE 

OF INTEREST

Scientists Aren’t Buying a Tech CEO’s “Theory of Everything”

Last month, Wolfram Research CEO Stephen Wolfram published a 448-page paper that he claims creates a “path to the fundamental theory of physics.” Basically, Wolfram claims to have created a theory of everything.

But scientists, particularly physicists, aren’t convinced.

READ MORE 

NEWS IN QUOTES

“ At the moment, I don’t know what stomach there would be for stories about societies falling apart, so I’m not working away on one of those. 

Laws


LAWS THAT YOU DIDN’T LEARN AT SCHOOL

  1. LORENZ’S LAW OF MECHANICAL REPAIR

Once your hands become coated with grease, your nose will begin to itch.

  1. ANTHONY’S LAW OF THE WORKSHOP

Any tool, when dropped, will roll to the least accessible corner.

  1. KOVAC’S CONUNDRUM

When u dial a wrong number, u never get an engaged tone.

  1. CANNON’S KARMIC LAW

If u tell the boss u were late for work because u had a flat tyre, the next morning u will have a flat tyre.

05 O’BRIEN’S VARIATION LAW

If u change queues, the one u have left will start to move faster than the one u are in now.

  1. BELL’S THEOREM

When the body is immersed in water, the telephone rings.

  1. RUBY’S PRINCIPLE OF CLOSE ENCOUNTERS

The probability of meeting someone u know increases when u are with someone u don’t want to be seen with.

  1. WILLOUGHBY’S LAW

When u try to prove to someone that a machine won’t work, it will.

  1. ZADRA’S LAW OF BIOMECHANICS

The severity of the itch is inversely proportional to the reach.

  1. BREDA’S RULE

At any event, the people whose seats are farthest from the aisle arrive last.

  1. OWEN’S LAW

As soon as u sit down to a cup of hot coffee, your boss will ask u to do something which will last until the coffee is cold.

😇

68 Bits of Unsolicited Advice -Day 1


68 Bits of Unsolicited Advice

 

It’s my birthday. I’m 68. I feel like pulling up a rocking chair and dispensing advice to the young ‘uns. Here are 68 pithy bits of unsolicited advice which I offer as my birthday present to all of you.

• Learn how to learn from those you disagree with, or even offend you. See if you can find the truth in what they believe.

• Being enthusiastic is worth 25 IQ points.

• Always demand a deadline. A deadline weeds out the extraneous and the ordinary. It prevents you from trying to make it perfect, so you have to make it different. Different is better.

• Don’t be afraid to ask a question that may sound stupid because 99% of the time everyone else is thinking of the same question and is too embarrassed to ask it.

• Being able to listen well is a superpower. While listening to someone you love keep asking them “Is there more?”, until there is no more.

• A worthy goal for a year is to learn enough about a subject so that you can’t believe how ignorant you were a year earlier.

• Gratitude will unlock all other virtues and is something you can get better at.

• Treating a person to a meal never fails, and is so easy to do. It’s powerful with old friends and a great way to make new friends.

• Don’t trust all-purpose glue.

• Reading to your children regularly will bond you together and kickstart their imaginations.

• Never use a credit card for credit. The only kind of credit, or debt, that is acceptable is debt to acquire something whose exchange value is extremely likely to increase, like in a home. The exchange value of most things diminishes or vanishes the moment you purchase them. Don’t be in debt to losers.

• Pros are just amateurs who know how to gracefully recover from their mistakes.

• Extraordinary claims should require extraordinary evidence to be believed.

• Don’t be the smartest person in the room. Hangout with, and learn from, people smarter than yourself. Even better, find smart people who will disagree with you.

• Rule of 3 in conversation. To get to the real reason, ask a person to go deeper than what they just said. Then again, and once more. The third time’s answer is close to the truth.

• Don’t be the best. Be the only.

• Everyone is shy. Other people are waiting for you to introduce yourself to them, they are waiting for you to send them an email, they are waiting for you to ask them on a date. Go ahead.

• Don’t take it personally when someone turns you down. Assume they are like you: busy, occupied, distracted. Try again later. It’s amazing how often a second try works.

• The purpose of a habit is to remove that action from self-negotiation. You no longer expend energy deciding whether to do it. You just do it. Good habits can range from telling the truth, to flossing.

• Promptness is a sign of respect.

• When you are young spend at least 6 months to one year living as poor as you can, owning as little as you possibly can, eating beans and rice in a tiny room or tent, to experience what your “worst” lifestyle might be. That way any time you have to risk something in the future you won’t be afraid of the worst case scenario.

• Trust me: There is no “them”.

• The more you are interested in others, the more interesting they find you. To be interesting, be interested.

• Optimize your generosity. No one on their deathbed has ever regretted giving too much away.

• To make something good, just do it. To make something great, just re-do it, re-do it, re-do it. The secret to making fine things is in remaking them.

• The Golden Rule will never fail you. It is the foundation of all other virtues.

• If you are looking for something in your house, and you finally find it, when you’re done with it, don’t put it back where you found it. Put it back where you first looked for it.

• Saving money and investing money are both good habits. Small amounts of money invested regularly for many decades without deliberation is one path to wealth.

• To make mistakes is human. To own your mistakes is divine. Nothing elevates a person higher than quickly admitting and taking personal responsibility for the mistakes you make and then fixing them fairly. If you mess up, fess up. It’s astounding how powerful this ownership is.

• Never get involved in a land war in Asia.

• You can obsess about serving your customers/audience/clients, or you can obsess about beating the competition. Both work, but of the two, obsessing about your customers will take you further.

• Show up. Keep showing up. Somebody successful said: 99% of success is just showing up.

• Separate the processes of creation from improving. You can’t write and edit, or sculpt and polish, or make and analyze at the same time. If you do, the editor stops the creator. While you invent, don’t select. While you sketch, don’t inspect. While you write the first draft, don’t reflect. At the start, the creator mind must be unleashed from judgement.

• If you are not falling down occasionally, you are just coasting.

• Perhaps the most counter-intuitive truth of the universe is that the more you give to others, the more you’ll get. Understanding this is the beginning of wisdom.

• Friends are better than money. Almost anything money can do, friends can do better. In so many ways a friend with a boat is better than owning a boat.

• This is true: It’s hard to cheat an honest man.

• When an object is lost, 95% of the time it is hiding within arm’s reach of where it was last seen. Search in all possible locations in that radius and you’ll find it.

• You are what you do. Not what you say, not what you believe, not how you vote, but what you spend your time on.

• If you lose or forget to bring a cable, adapter or charger, check with your hotel. Most hotels now have a drawer full of cables, adapters and chargers others have left behind, and probably have the one you are missing. You can often claim it after borrowing it.

• Hatred is a curse that does not affect the hated. It only poisons the hater. Release a grudge as if it was a poison.

• There is no limit on better. Talent is distributed unfairly, but there is no limit on how much we can improve what we start with.

• Be prepared: When you are 90% done any large project (a house, a film, an event, an app) the rest of the myriad details will take a second 90% to complete.

• When you die you take absolutely nothing with you except your reputation.

• Before you are old, attend as many funerals as you can bear, and listen. Nobody talks about the departed’s achievements. The only thing people will remember is what kind of person you were while you were achieving.

• For every dollar you spend purchasing something substantial, expect to pay a dollar in repairs, maintenance, or disposal by the end of its life.

•Anything real begins with the fiction of what could be. Imagination is therefore the most potent force in the universe, and a skill you can get better at. It’s the one skill in life that benefits from ignoring what everyone else knows.

• When crisis and disaster strike, don’t waste them. No problems, no progress.

• On vacation go to the most remote place on your itinerary first, bypassing the cities. You’ll maximize the shock of otherness in the remote, and then later you’ll welcome the familiar comforts of a city on the way back.

• When you get an invitation to do something in the future, ask yourself: would you accept this if it was scheduled for tomorrow? Not too many promises will pass that immediacy filter.

• Don’t say anything about someone in email you would not be comfortable saying to them directly, because eventually they will read it.

• If you desperately need a job, you are just another problem for a boss; if you can solve many of the problems the boss has right now, you are hired. To be hired, think like your boss.

• Art is in what you leave out.

• Acquiring things will rarely bring you deep satisfaction. But acquiring experiences will.

• Rule of 7 in research. You can find out anything if you are willing to go seven levels. If the first source you ask doesn’t know, ask them who you should ask next, and so on down the line. If you are willing to go to the 7th source, you’ll almost always get your answer.

• How to apologize: Quickly, specifically, sincerely.

• Don’t ever respond to a solicitation or a proposal on the phone. The urgency is a disguise.

• When someone is nasty, rude, hateful, or mean with you, pretend they have a disease. That makes it easier to have empathy toward them which can soften the conflict.

• Eliminating clutter makes room for your true treasures.

• You really don’t want to be famous. Read the biography of any famous person.

• Experience is overrated. When hiring, hire for aptitude, train for skills. Most really amazing or great things are done by people doing them for the first time.

• A vacation + a disaster = an adventure.

• Buying tools: Start by buying the absolute cheapest tools you can find. Upgrade the ones you use a lot. If you wind up using some tool for a job, buy the very best you can afford.

• Learn how to take a 20-minute power nap without embarrassment.

• Following your bliss is a recipe for paralysis if you don’t know what you are passionate about. A better motto for most youth is “master something, anything”. Through mastery of one thing, you can drift towards extensions of that mastery that bring you more joy, and eventually discover where your bliss is.

• I’m positive that in 100 years much of what I take to be true today will be proved to be wrong, maybe even embarrassingly wrong, and I try really hard to identify what it is that I am wrong about today.

• Over the long term, the future is decided by optimists. To be an optimist you don’t have to ignore all the many problems we create; you just have to imagine improving our capacity to solve problems.

• The universe is conspiring behind your back to make you a success. This will be much easier to do if you embrace this pronoia.

[You can follow me @kevin2kelly]

Translation in FrenchPortugueseGerman. Other translations welcomed.

Michael Tubbs: The political power of being a good neighbor | TED Talk


via Michael Tubbs: The political power of being a good neighbor | TED Talk

Michael Tubbs is the youngest mayor in American history to represent a city with more than 100,000 people — and his policies are sparking national conversations. In this rousing talk, he shares how growing up amid poverty and violence in Stockton, California shaped his bold vision for change and his commitment to govern as a neighbor, not a politician. “When we see someone different from us, they should not reflect our fears, our anxieties, our insecurities,” he says. “We should see our common humanity.”

68 Bits of Unsolicited Advice – Day 2


68 Bits of Unsolicited Advice

 

It’s my birthday. I’m 68. I feel like pulling up a rocking chair and dispensing advice to the young ‘uns. Here are 68 pithy bits of unsolicited advice which I offer as my birthday present to all of you.

• Learn how to learn from those you disagree with, or even offend you. See if you can find the truth in what they believe.

• Being enthusiastic is worth 25 IQ points.

• Always demand a deadline. A deadline weeds out the extraneous and the ordinary. It prevents you from trying to make it perfect, so you have to make it different. Different is better.

• Don’t be afraid to ask a question that may sound stupid because 99% of the time everyone else is thinking of the same question and is too embarrassed to ask it.

• Being able to listen well is a superpower. While listening to someone you love keep asking them “Is there more?”, until there is no more.

• A worthy goal for a year is to learn enough about a subject so that you can’t believe how ignorant you were a year earlier.

• Gratitude will unlock all other virtues and is something you can get better at.

• Treating a person to a meal never fails, and is so easy to do. It’s powerful with old friends and a great way to make new friends.

• Don’t trust all-purpose glue.

• Reading to your children regularly will bond you together and kickstart their imaginations.

• Never use a credit card for credit. The only kind of credit, or debt, that is acceptable is debt to acquire something whose exchange value is extremely likely to increase, like in a home. The exchange value of most things diminishes or vanishes the moment you purchase them. Don’t be in debt to losers.

• Pros are just amateurs who know how to gracefully recover from their mistakes.

• Extraordinary claims should require extraordinary evidence to be believed.

• Don’t be the smartest person in the room. Hangout with, and learn from, people smarter than yourself. Even better, find smart people who will disagree with you.

• Rule of 3 in conversation. To get to the real reason, ask a person to go deeper than what they just said. Then again, and once more. The third time’s answer is close to the truth.

• Don’t be the best. Be the only.

• Everyone is shy. Other people are waiting for you to introduce yourself to them, they are waiting for you to send them an email, they are waiting for you to ask them on a date. Go ahead.

• Don’t take it personally when someone turns you down. Assume they are like you: busy, occupied, distracted. Try again later. It’s amazing how often a second try works.

• The purpose of a habit is to remove that action from self-negotiation. You no longer expend energy deciding whether to do it. You just do it. Good habits can range from telling the truth, to flossing.

• Promptness is a sign of respect.

• When you are young spend at least 6 months to one year living as poor as you can, owning as little as you possibly can, eating beans and rice in a tiny room or tent, to experience what your “worst” lifestyle might be. That way any time you have to risk something in the future you won’t be afraid of the worst case scenario.

• Trust me: There is no “them”.

• The more you are interested in others, the more interesting they find you. To be interesting, be interested.

• Optimize your generosity. No one on their deathbed has ever regretted giving too much away.

• To make something good, just do it. To make something great, just re-do it, re-do it, re-do it. The secret to making fine things is in remaking them.

• The Golden Rule will never fail you. It is the foundation of all other virtues.

• If you are looking for something in your house, and you finally find it, when you’re done with it, don’t put it back where you found it. Put it back where you first looked for it.

• Saving money and investing money are both good habits. Small amounts of money invested regularly for many decades without deliberation is one path to wealth.

• To make mistakes is human. To own your mistakes is divine. Nothing elevates a person higher than quickly admitting and taking personal responsibility for the mistakes you make and then fixing them fairly. If you mess up, fess up. It’s astounding how powerful this ownership is.

• Never get involved in a land war in Asia.

• You can obsess about serving your customers/audience/clients, or you can obsess about beating the competition. Both work, but of the two, obsessing about your customers will take you further.

• Show up. Keep showing up. Somebody successful said: 99% of success is just showing up.

• Separate the processes of creation from improving. You can’t write and edit, or sculpt and polish, or make and analyze at the same time. If you do, the editor stops the creator. While you invent, don’t select. While you sketch, don’t inspect. While you write the first draft, don’t reflect. At the start, the creator mind must be unleashed from judgement.

• If you are not falling down occasionally, you are just coasting.

• Perhaps the most counter-intuitive truth of the universe is that the more you give to others, the more you’ll get. Understanding this is the beginning of wisdom.

• Friends are better than money. Almost anything money can do, friends can do better. In so many ways a friend with a boat is better than owning a boat.

• This is true: It’s hard to cheat an honest man.

• When an object is lost, 95% of the time it is hiding within arm’s reach of where it was last seen. Search in all possible locations in that radius and you’ll find it.

• You are what you do. Not what you say, not what you believe, not how you vote, but what you spend your time on.

• If you lose or forget to bring a cable, adapter or charger, check with your hotel. Most hotels now have a drawer full of cables, adapters and chargers others have left behind, and probably have the one you are missing. You can often claim it after borrowing it.

• Hatred is a curse that does not affect the hated. It only poisons the hater. Release a grudge as if it was a poison.

• There is no limit on better. Talent is distributed unfairly, but there is no limit on how much we can improve what we start with.

• Be prepared: When you are 90% done any large project (a house, a film, an event, an app) the rest of the myriad details will take a second 90% to complete.

• When you die you take absolutely nothing with you except your reputation.

• Before you are old, attend as many funerals as you can bear, and listen. Nobody talks about the departed’s achievements. The only thing people will remember is what kind of person you were while you were achieving.

• For every dollar you spend purchasing something substantial, expect to pay a dollar in repairs, maintenance, or disposal by the end of its life.

•Anything real begins with the fiction of what could be. Imagination is therefore the most potent force in the universe, and a skill you can get better at. It’s the one skill in life that benefits from ignoring what everyone else knows.

• When crisis and disaster strike, don’t waste them. No problems, no progress.

• On vacation go to the most remote place on your itinerary first, bypassing the cities. You’ll maximize the shock of otherness in the remote, and then later you’ll welcome the familiar comforts of a city on the way back.

• When you get an invitation to do something in the future, ask yourself: would you accept this if it was scheduled for tomorrow? Not too many promises will pass that immediacy filter.

• Don’t say anything about someone in email you would not be comfortable saying to them directly, because eventually they will read it.

• If you desperately need a job, you are just another problem for a boss; if you can solve many of the problems the boss has right now, you are hired. To be hired, think like your boss.

• Art is in what you leave out.

• Acquiring things will rarely bring you deep satisfaction. But acquiring experiences will.

• Rule of 7 in research. You can find out anything if you are willing to go seven levels. If the first source you ask doesn’t know, ask them who you should ask next, and so on down the line. If you are willing to go to the 7th source, you’ll almost always get your answer.

• How to apologize: Quickly, specifically, sincerely.

• Don’t ever respond to a solicitation or a proposal on the phone. The urgency is a disguise.

• When someone is nasty, rude, hateful, or mean with you, pretend they have a disease. That makes it easier to have empathy toward them which can soften the conflict.

• Eliminating clutter makes room for your true treasures.

• You really don’t want to be famous. Read the biography of any famous person.

• Experience is overrated. When hiring, hire for aptitude, train for skills. Most really amazing or great things are done by people doing them for the first time.

• A vacation + a disaster = an adventure.

• Buying tools: Start by buying the absolute cheapest tools you can find. Upgrade the ones you use a lot. If you wind up using some tool for a job, buy the very best you can afford.

• Learn how to take a 20-minute power nap without embarrassment.

• Following your bliss is a recipe for paralysis if you don’t know what you are passionate about. A better motto for most youth is “master something, anything”. Through mastery of one thing, you can drift towards extensions of that mastery that bring you more joy, and eventually discover where your bliss is.

• I’m positive that in 100 years much of what I take to be true today will be proved to be wrong, maybe even embarrassingly wrong, and I try really hard to identify what it is that I am wrong about today.

• Over the long term, the future is decided by optimists. To be an optimist you don’t have to ignore all the many problems we create; you just have to imagine improving our capacity to solve problems.

• The universe is conspiring behind your back to make you a success. This will be much easier to do if you embrace this pronoia.

[You can follow me @kevin2kelly]

Translation in FrenchPortugueseGerman. Other translations welcomed.

futurism Newsletter I like


84b086db-c1b2-4e8f-bd12-d446f884c986.png

The Future Is Mysterious Spacecraft

7 MAY 2020

TOP STORY

The Space Force Is About to Launch a Mysterious Spacecraft

Officials from the U.S. Space Force announced Wednesday that the military branch will launch a new mission on May 16 — using the mysterious X-37B space plane to do so, which has spent years at a time in orbit without any public-facing explanation.

READ MORE 

HEADLINES FROM TODAY

ONEShrugging Off Pandemic, Tesla Prepares to Restart CA Factory

READ MORE 

TWOScientists Say Llama Antibodies Could Be Key to Defeating COVID

READ MORE 

THREE“Black Mirror” Creator: World Too Stressed Out For New Episodes

READ MORE 

FOURElon Musk: Neuralink Will Do Human Brain Implant in “Less Than a Year”

READ MORE 

OF INTEREST

White House Secretly Buried CDC Guidelines on Reopening Country

After scientists and health experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) drafted up a comprehensive guide for how American businesses might safely re-open, the White House reportedly buried it.

The 17-page document offered specific recommendations to law enforcement and authorities on how to go about opening public spaces and resuming some semblance of normal life.

READ MORE 

NEWS IN QUOTES

“ Sure, it’s very attractive but we don’t know if there is immunity, how powerful it is, or how long it lasts. 

Interesting News on our RADAR.


On Our Radar

  • A remote fishing village in Belize whose access to safe drinking water was interrupted due to COVID-19 will use Zero Mass Water’s solar power tech to harness water from the air.
  • MIT Technology Review published this piece on how COVID-19 has blown apart the myth of Silicon Valley innovation.
  • Meaningful leadership has never been so important. The Beautiful Truth presents a five-part “Leader Series” that investigates the experiences that drive business leaders towards their cause.
  • Our inimitable teammate Trish is back with another article that reflects on her time spent in quarantine, this time with lessons learned from midwifing a feral cat.
  • How does a startup survive an existential crisis? By remembering that there is a bigger purpose to its existence.

Newsletters I like


News from the Future

Future Shock is Here: A Future Now Special Edition #4

curated by Institute for the Future

May 7, 2020 – Issue #40 – View online

Like News from the Future?
Share this link to our subscription page.

What’s After the Pandemic?
It’s Up to You

Six steps for imagining post-COVID-19 Futures

We’re up to our necks. We’re barraged by daily surprises, conflicting information, and vague ideas about how long the pandemic will last. We’re uncertain about the present (“Will I catch COVID if I go to the drug store?”) and the near future (“Will I get my job back?”). We’re stressed-out and anxious. Yet to quote IFTF’s Marina Gorbis and Kathi Vian: “Even as all these very real crises demand immediate attention, there’s a longer story to be written.”

The time to write that story is now. The sooner we start imagining what’s on the other side, the more likely we’ll be able to shape that future. And because it’s important that many different voices have a say in writing the story of our post-COVID-19 future, IFTF has created a six-step guide for how to craft compelling, internally consistent visions of the future.

We want to hear your post-COVID-19 future story.
Post it to social media with #Imaginable.

“What Can We Build After the Global Pandemic?”

Read the full Post-COVID19 Futures essay co-authored by IFTF Executive Director, Marina Gorbis and IFTF Distinguished Fellow, Kathi Vian.

Escape the Boxes that Limit Your
Effectiveness as a Leader

Bob Johansen’s newest book is now available!

The future will get even more perplexing over the next decade…and we’re not ready. Instead, we’re restricted by rigid categorical thinking that locks us and our organizations in neatly defined boxes that are often inaccurate or obsolete.

Full-Spectrum Thinking, the latest book from IFTF Distinguished Fellow Bob Johansen, helps you identify patterns and clarity outside, across, beyond, and without boxes—all while resisting false certainty and simplistic binary choices.

Johansen lays out the core concepts of full-spectrum thinking and explores the role that digital media—gameful engagement, big-data analytics, visualization, blockchain, machine learning, and more—will play in facilitating and enhancing it. This visionary book provides powerful ways to make sense of new opportunities and see the world as it really is.

Read or listen to a sample chapter of Full-Spectrum Thinking  >>

IFTF Online Collaboration
The Great Communications Hackathon

Public Webinar
THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2020
9:00am PT

This webinar had to be rescheduled.
We hope that you can join us on this new date!

Toshi Anders Hoo joins Mark Frauenfelder to explore the future of human communication, collaboration and connection through emerging media technologies. The covid-19 pandemic has instigated an unprecedented global experiment as people around the world try to figure out how to translate their social, personal, and professional lives into the constraints of online tools and networks. The EML is looking both at the urgent futures during this forced global hackathon, as well as the long-term futures of social virtual reality platforms where people will be embodied as 3D avatars and inhabit shared virtual worlds.

Register here to join this conversation >>

Learn to Think Like a Futurist:

Announcing a Very Special Immersive Foresight Package

IFTF Foresight Essentials signature 3-day training, delivered online

For a limited time only, IFTF invites you to an exclusive learning package designed for people looking to amplify their strategic foresight skills and knowledge during the uncertain times of this pandemic. This May and June, you’ll learn the same incredible content as the IFTF Foresight Essentials signature 3-day training, delivered online with two format options and dates for you to choose from.

The package also includes an exciting new opportunity never before offered to our IFTF Foresight Essentials attendees: a ticket to IFTF’s annual futures research conference, in mid-September, when you’ll join IFTF’s global gathering of foresight colleagues for a deep dive into research about the world in the coming decade.

Limited spots are available.
For further information, and to register, please email Neela Lazkani at nlazkani@iftf.org >> 

Foresight is a skill. Learn from the experts.

IFTF Foresight Talks:
Building the Nation’s First Lab to Explore the Future of Social Work

TUESDAY, MAY 19
9:00am PDT

According to Portland State University’s Professor Dr. Laura Nissen, PSU’s new National Social Work Education Health Futures Lab will “create opportunities for social workers to come together and envision a world they would like to be in while building the skills to help get there.”

Dr. Nissen is the new lab’s principal investigator. Make plans to join IFTF’s free webinar with her—she’s also a PSU Presidential Futures Fellow and IFTF Research Fellow—to learn how she’s spearheading significant research projects in technology use and impact, climate change, and more.Register here to join the conversation >>

IFTF in the News

“We Need Herd Immunity From Trump and the Coronavirus,” Thomas Friedman mentioned Marina Gorbis and Cognitive Immunity. (The New York Times, 4/24/2020)“How to Deal With Your Kid’s Annoying Habits,” Jacob Towery quotes Jane McGonigal. (The New York Times, 4/15/20)

“How has Taiwan kept its coronavirus infection rate so low?” Deutsche Welle quotes Nick Monaco. (Indian Express, 4/9/20)

“Coronavirus pandemic: When will life go back to normal? Hopefully never, says Silicon Valley futurist,” David Louie and Alix Martichoux interviewed Marina Gorbis. (ABC 7 News, 4/7/20)

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About Institute for the Future

Institute for the Future is the world’s leading futures organization. For over 50 years, businesses, governments, and social impact organizations have depended upon IFTF global forecasts, custom research, and foresight training to navigate complex change and develop world-ready strategies. IFTF methodologies and toolsets yield coherent views of transformative possibilities across all sectors that together support a more sustainable future. Institute for the Future is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization based in Palo Alto, California.

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8. International Thalassemia Day – 8th May


8. International Thalassemia Day – 8th May

International Thalassemia Day is celebrated to spread awareness about this inherited blood disease and to encourage all those with this disease who have kept their hopes high.

Content marketing opportunities:   

  • Listicle idea: X Foods that can increase the RBC count in your body
  • Infographic idea: What are the symptoms of thalassemia?
  • Video idea: What role does RBC play in maintaining a healthy body?
  • Podcast idea: What are the treatment options for someone with thalassemia?

7. World Red Cross Day – 8th May


7. World Red Cross Day – 8th May

This day is an annual celebration of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent movement.

Content marketing opportunities:   

  • Listicle idea: Signs to look out for if you’re anemic
  • Infographic idea: Here’s how you can enroll for the Red Cross
  • Video idea: X Do’s and don’ts of blood donation
  • Podcast idea: Donating blood in the times of coronavirus: How can you determine if your blood is ‘eligible’ to be donated?

Brand campaign that worked:

This video from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital teaches us how to perform CPR on anyone aged 12 and above.

(127) Why Spitters Could Be Charged As Terrorists Because Of The Coronavirus | Forbes – YouTube


As many people take precautionary measures to prevent the spread of coronavirus, a bizarre spate of reports are emerging nationwide of others allegedly spitting and coughing in public, perhaps to infect others, leading officials to issue warnings that perpetrators will be prosecuted—possibly, even, for terrorism.

via (127) Why Spitters Could Be Charged As Terrorists Because Of The Coronavirus | Forbes – YouTube