Rolls-Royce Is Building Tiny Nuclear Reactors


via Rolls-Royce Is Building Tiny Nuclear Reactors

Humanity Free verse by jay


How happy is the dark planet!
Does the planet make you shiver?
does it?

All that is unmoral is not pollution,
pollution, by all account is moral.
Are you upset by how unmoral it is?
Does it tear you apart to see the pollution-free clean-living?

Don’t believe that sustainability is thin?
the sustainability is fat beyond belief.
Click. click, click.

Random Acts of Kindness


1. Give toys to the children at the shelter or safe house
2. Give your partner the benefit of the doubt.
3. Offer a homeless person your leftovers bag from the restaurant.
4. Tell someone you know why you are thankful for them
5. Tutor a student who is struggling with a subject in which you have skill.

Wisdom Quotes


Being sane or insane is relative.

A question that sometimes drives me hazy: am I or are the others crazy? (Albert Einstein)

Even your smallest action can change the world for the better.
In a gentle way, you can shake the world. (Mahatma Gandhi)

The Billionaire MORONS against India, Hindus, BJP and Indian Peace, Stability and Growth. Shame! Shame!


Billionaire George Soros Pledges $1 Billion University Fund To Fight – Shame

‘Would-Be Dictators’Soros also singled out Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi for criticism warning that the BJP politician’s actions were the “most frightening setback” in the battle for open society against “would-be and actual dictators.” Soros said “democratically elected Narendra Modi is creating a Hindu nationalist state, imposing punitive measures on Kashmir, a semiautonomous Muslim region, and threatening to deprive millions of Muslims of their citizenship.”

via Billionaire George Soros Pledges $1 Billion University Fund To Fight ‘Would-Be Dictators’

 

The Way You Taste (The Stunning, Tasty And Intelligent Person Song)


via The Way You Taste (The Stunning, Tasty And Intelligent Person Song)

The Way You Taste (The Stunning, Tasty And Intelligent Person Song)

Dhananjay Parkhe

Jan 25 · 1 min read

The Way You Taste (The Stunning, Tasty And Intelligent Person Song)©

By DhAnAnjAyA “jAy” Parkhe

You find so many people are cunning
But you, you are mostly stunning

I like the way you taste.
You do it like a foretaste.
I like the way you kick.
You are just so nonstick.
I like the way you chuckle.
You do it like a buckle.

You find so many people are hasty
But you, you are mostly tasty

I love the way you wear your hair,
Spreading your style everywhere.
You’re like a style fountain.
Enough zazz for a whole mountain.

You find so many people are unintelligent
But you, you are mostly intelligent

You’re the perfect person.
You could meet a worse one.

You find so many people are grave
But you, you are mostly brave

Stunning, tasty and intelligent,
Brave and exciting too,
Are the qualities of you

You find so many people are unexciting
But you, you are mostly exciting

Created on 20th December 2019©

Dhananjay Parkhe

WRITTEN BY

Global Speaker, Mentor, Author, Poet (Corporate bard), Blogger, Advisor

The Way You Taste (The Stunning, Tasty And Intelligent Person Song)


via The Way You Taste (The Stunning, Tasty And Intelligent Person Song)

The Way You Taste (The Stunning, Tasty And Intelligent Person Song)

Dhananjay Parkhe

Jan 25 · 1 min read

The Way You Taste (The Stunning, Tasty And Intelligent Person Song)©

By DhAnAnjAyA “jAy” Parkhe

You find so many people are cunning
But you, you are mostly stunning

I like the way you taste.
You do it like a foretaste.
I like the way you kick.
You are just so nonstick.
I like the way you chuckle.
You do it like a buckle.

You find so many people are hasty
But you, you are mostly tasty

I love the way you wear your hair,
Spreading your style everywhere.
You’re like a style fountain.
Enough zazz for a whole mountain.

You find so many people are unintelligent
But you, you are mostly intelligent

You’re the perfect person.
You could meet a worse one.

You find so many people are grave
But you, you are mostly brave

Stunning, tasty and intelligent,
Brave and exciting too,
Are the qualities of you

You find so many people are unexciting
But you, you are mostly exciting

Created on 20th December 2019©

Dhananjay Parkhe

WRITTEN BY

Global Speaker, Mentor, Author, Poet (Corporate bard), Blogger, Advisor

In a Nutshell Must REad from PNUTs newsletter


SEASONED NUTS: QUOTABLE
“The belief in a supernatural source of evil is not necessary; men alone are quite capable of every wickedness.”

“Facing it, always facing it, that’s the way to get through. Face it.”

― Joseph Conrad

IN A NUTSHELL: MUST READ

Andrew Renneisen via Getty Images

The Limits of American Power: Hearts of Darkness

The US military has been expanding its presence and operations in Africa over the past decade, with little transparency. Not much was known about the objectives of its operations, how those operations were carried out, the facilities it used, and how it partnered with governments in the region. It wasn’t until four US special operations forces were ambushed and wounded, one killed, in Niger in October 2017 that the media began asking more questions about various military efforts to combat jihadi groups in West Africa, and the public began paying some attention.

Al-Shabab, the Al Qaeda-affiliated extremist group based in Somalia, claimed responsibility. President Trump loosened Obama-era constraints on military activities in Somalia and declared that country an “area of active hostilities” subject to war-zone rules. Since then he’s continued to escalate battle against the Shabab, even as he has sought to scale back operations against similar Islamist insurgencies elsewhere in the world. But Al Shabab proved resilient against American airstrikes, continuing to carry out bombings in East Africa.

Because most of America was focused on the January 3 Trump-ordered assassination of Iran’s top general, little attention was paid to a brazen assault January 5 at Manda Bay, Kenya, a sleepy seaside military base near the Somali border. Shabab fighters easily accessed the airstrip, bombed a plane with two military contractors inside, killed an Army specialist, destroyed a fuel storage area and a significant portion of the American aircraft fleet, rendering the airfield useless and costing the Pentagon millions of dollars. Fortunately this “serious security lapse” has claimed the attention of Congress and Pentagon officials, and is under investigation.

 

Myanmar’s Nobel War Prize Winner

  • In a momentous and unanimous decision, the UN’s highest court — the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague — ordered Myanmar to prevent genocidal violence against the country’s Rohingya Muslim minority and to preserve any evidence of past crimes.
  • The court found prima facie evidence of breaches of the 1948 Genocide Convention. and warned that the estimated 600,000 Rohingya remaining in Myanmar were “extremely vulnerable” to attacks by the military. The court imposed emergency “provisional measures” on the country and instructed Aung San Suu Kyi’s government to respect the requirements of the convention.
  • Aung San Suu Kyi, who had previously been awarded a Nobel peace prize, spent last month’s three day trial defending Myanmar’s military against accusations of systematic human rights abuses and war crimes. The ruling was an outright rejection of her defense.
  • The genocide convention was enacted after the Holocaust. The chief counsel for Gambia, the country that brought the case alleging Myanmar had breached the convention, said: “On the cusp of the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, the court’s clear and forceful [binding] order is a significant day for international law, the rights of individuals and groups, and the meaningful obligation of every state and person to desist from any act that could plausibly be characterized as genocide.” (Guardian)

 

Did you know…


Did you know…

… that today is the birthday of Grunge? In 1988, Nirvana recorded a ten-song demo tape with Jack Endino, the godfather of grunge. A producer heard the tape and offered to put out a Nirvana single. Trivia buffs: Kurt had many pets during his life including a pet rat he called Kitty, a cat named Melvin, and many turtles that he used to take care of.

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“Just because something doesn’t do what you planned it to do doesn’t mean it’s useless.”

— Thomas A. Edison

World Economic Forum Annual Meeting | World Economic Forum . Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations, on the ‘4 horsemen’


via World Economic Forum Annual Meeting | World Economic Forum

 

Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations, on the ‘4 horsemen’

António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations, outlined “four horsemen” that threatened our world.

“If I had to use two words to describe the state of the world it would be uncertainty and instability,” he said.

He outlined the four threats.

Climate war

“Humankind has declared a war on nature and nature is striking back in a very violent way,” he said.

“We are not winning this war and we absolutely must do it”

“We will be destroyed by climate change, not the planet. This will be for us a clear indication that we absolutely need to change course.”

The implications of climate change are dramatic, from fires to droughts that cause conflict, he said.

“The scientific community has told us exactly what we need to do,” he said, outlining the Paris Agreement targets.

“But the present portfolios represent an economy that is moving the world to 3-4 degrees of warming.”

“The lack of political will has not allowed the world to fulfill what was promised in Paris.”

The big emitters are absolutely essential – without them “we will be doomed.”

Addiction to coal in Asia has to be tackled, he said.

“We need to put a price on carbon. It has a real impact that has to be priced. We need to shift taxation from income to carbon, which is a win-win situation. We need to cut subsidies to fossil fuels. As a taxpayer I can’t accept the idea my taxes are being used to… bleach corals or melt glaciers.”

There are encouraging shifts in cities, in public opinion and the mobilization of youth.

He said he was hopeful that we could mobilize public and private sectors to make the “transformational changes” that were necessary.

Unfair globalization

Governments must understand that they must give voice to their people, give them ways to participate, respect the civic space, respect the young and create conditions for gender equality.

We need to work together for a fair globalization, he said. But we are lagging behind.

We need to accelerate: we need to make a huge effort, he said.

Increase of geopolitical tension

There are dysfunctional relations in the Security Council, he said.

“It risks a great fracture in the world.”

Dark side of digital

We need to make sure that Artificial Intelligence becomes a force for good, he said. “We need to be able to boost international cooperation.”

He said the UN working in a network with many other institutions around the world for inclusive multilateralism.

“Governments control less and less of the collective life of countries.”

We must give voice to civil society, business and other groups, he said.

World Economic Forum Annual Meeting | World Economic Forum Four perspectives on the future of democracy and capitalism


via World Economic Forum Annual Meeting | World Economic Forum

Do elections bring about real change? 60% of voters don’t believe so.

In this environment – and one where capitalism is under criticism across the world – what’s the way forward?

Ngaire Woods, Dean, Blavatnik School of Government; Niall Ferguson, Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University; Martin Wolf, Associate Editor and Chief Economics Commentator, Financial Times and Dambisa Moyo, Global Economist, Mildstorm Group debate what the future might hold.

For more on the future of capitalism, why not check out Professor Schwab’s piece on stakeholder capitalism and the new Davos manifesto?

Davos World Economic Forum Klaus Schwab

The one thing you would change?

Paul Polman says we need to change how we view financial markets.

For Niall Ferguson, we need to change how we teach our students about democracy and capitalism, which has gone disasterously wrong.

We need to end short-termism, says Dambisa Moyo.

It’s provocative, but credible control of our borders is vital for democratic capitalism, says Martin Wolf.

Border control

I’m a passionate believer in democracy and capitalism, Wolf makes clear, and I’ve been thinking about their relationship.

There is a tension, the democractic system relates to a territory in which people are citizens, which inspires loyalty. Capitalism, by its nature, is global. The core of this tension, increasingly, comes from the question of who can live in your country.

So, without credible control of borders – movement of people – a vast numer of people will feel their citizenship, a key part of people’s identity, is out of their control.

This doesn’t mean no immigration. It means credible control.

But the question is, how do you do control? What should the policy be? That’s the challenge.

Mayo asks Wolf – does it matter the reason why these people turn up on their doorstep? She also reminds the audience that many people don’t want to leave their own countries, but they have no choice. She urges us not to view the situation in a snapshot, but over the longer term.

Wolf reminds us that he’s the child of refugees, and that he believes very strongly in the principles of refugee and asylum

The logical consequence is that there should be a massive effort to solve the problems that cause these refugee flows and correcting the policy mistakes that led to them, he says.

His view is that if we don’t establish the principle that we can control our borders, we’re going to end up with a serious danger of neo-fascist governments.

Abdication of responsibility

Dambisa Moyo believes that governments have abdicated responsibility in a number of areas – from infrastructure to regulation.

We have a long-list of deep-seated structural problems – technology, population growth, natural resource scarcity, the threat of climate change. These are problem that require long-term thinking.

But we have a system where governments and politicians are rewarded for short-term behaviour.

In a nutshell, she believes corperations are unfairly being put under the spotlight to solve some of these issues.

We need accountability and long-term behaviours in government and public policies.

Woods argues that you need the private and public sector to work together – and Mayo agrees. But, regardless of conversations about what corporations need to do, governments need to create an environment in which corporations will behave – i.e. regulation or policy.

“Until you see government stepping up, until you see politicians taking the mantle and saying we absolutely will not stand for certain behaves and we actually stand for certain values and in terms of trying to address these many issues, I don’t think we will make much head way.”

Financial markets as a tipping point

We have a society with increasing inequality – driven by the economic system, focused on capital in its narrow definition, says Polman. Technology frightening the heck out of people, and climate change that can exaggerate poverty.

Many people felt that banks were too big to fail, but people too small to matter.

Therefore need to move beyond financial capital, to focus also on social and environmental capital. And businesses should care, because if society doesn’t function, neither will business.

We need to work in the system to change the system – and financial markets are the key drivers of change for business.

But progress is underway, explains Polman. We’re at the point now that the cost of not acting is starting to be higher than the cost of acting.

Financial markets should serve society – not the other way round. “We are all responsible for fixing the thing we have created.”

Time for an education

It’s not the repsonsibiity of corporations to address the wide-range of issues we’re concerned with, Ferguson says.

In a truly free society, you have the in-between, organisations that aren’t governed by markets or the states – the civil society.

If we want to address the issues that lie outside the realm of profit-maximising capitalism you have go to civil society.

We don’t live in a two-silo world – and people seem to have forgotten, or not been taught, that.

“Capitalism is the worst of all possible economic systems apart from all the others that have been tried from time to time,” he quips.

Education is therefore letting us down, and the problem is that we don’t understand what we’re talking about. And that’s because we haven’t been taught it properly – with the death of intellectual diversity the central issue.

“We as individual citizens need to recognise it is only through active participation and voluntary associations we can address the range of social problems and discussion here,” he believes.

Key quotes: When Your Doctor is a Robot

“When people think about robots they think about a clunky person with electric eyes sounding like a doctor. In reality robots are much much wider than that,” says Leif Johansson, Chairman of the Board, AstraZeneca AB.

Sorry, R2D2.

AI and robotics will be essential to screening programmes and extending access to care, he said.

He argued that the healthcare sector had been slow on the uptake with technology and this was not to the benefit of patients.

A doctor in the House

“Dr House used to say, everybody lies,” says Lisa Sanders, Associate Professor at the Yale Medical School and the doctor who was the inspiration behind the series House.

She questioned how technology would be able to assess patients when they’re complex and confused.

“The best piece of diagnostic scanner ever invented was the CT scanner. When the machine is able to get data directly from the patient’s body, that will be when AI will be able to compete with doctors.”

Three situations when you need a human

Jodi Halpern, Professor of Bioethics, gave her take on the situations when there is no replacement for an actual, human doctor.

Taking a medical history. We’ve wired up practices to find out when patients disclose information, and it’s when there’s empathy from the doctor, she said. Garbage in, garbage out: “if we don’t get a good history, we won’t get a good treatment.”

Trust to take medication. 50% of prescriptions aren’t taken. When patients trust their doctor they are more likely to follow through with their treatment.

Helping people deal with bad news. “We have very good evidence that patients with bad cancer diagnoses sought out treatments much more quickly.”

“This is what causes burnout in doctors”

“It’s not thinking, it’s all the other crap” – for example dealing with poorly conceived systems of medical records, says Lisa Sanders.

“They were all set up to get better billing.”

“They weren’t designed for patients or doctors. If you look at the healthcare system the people who are doing the best are the people who own the hospitals.”

Access to quality and affordable healthcare is a major issue in the United States.

Gene sequencing babies

In some conditions picked up with genetic sequencing, a small change in a baby’s diet can make the difference between ill health and normal development.

It offers huge potential but we need a practical and community-based process for informed consent, said Jodi Halpern.

The end of insurance as we know it?

“If you have a smart mattress, it knows everything about you,” she says. Medical data is no longer just recorded by your doctor.

“If your insurance company knows everything about your health, we don’t have insurance anymore. It’s the end of a social commons completely. We have a tremendous need for legal protection, for laws.”

This session is debating the pros and cons of moving to a healthcare system that makes more use of big data and automation.

“We need to decide what is useful medical data in a patient-centred health system,” said Leif Johansson.

“The worry that we have that these things might be misused is stopping us do things that could be very beneficial for patients,” he adds.

The complexity today is that “nothing is contained anymore,” said Jodi Halpern: where does medical data stop and the kind of data Silicon Valley is gathering from smart watches start?

“Someone at Apple knows that I walked from my hotel briskly this morning.”

Artificial Intelligence Robot Healthcare

The panellists were: Amy Bernstein, Editor, Harvard Business Review Magazine, Jodi Halpern, Professor of Bioethics and Medical Humanities, University of California, Lisa Sanders, Associate Professor, Yale University; Leif Johansson, Chairman of the Board, AstraZeneca AB

WORD OF THE DAY


WORD OF THE DAY
MacGuffin
mə-GUFF-in
Part of speech: noun
Origin: British English, 1930s
1

An object or event that serves as a plot device in fiction, but is ultimately irrelevant

2

A storytelling technique that serves to further the plot

Examples of MacGuffin in a sentence

“In ‘Titanic,’ the Heart of the Ocean necklace was nothing more than a MacGuffin — propelling the story, but not actually important.”

“The critics said his story relied too heavily upon a MacGuffin and never resolved the mystery.”

Sun Tzu Quotes


  1. “There is no instance of a country having benefited from prolonged warfare.” – Sun Tzu

  2. “You have to believe in yourself.” – Sun Tzu

  3. “When strong, avoid them. If of high morale, depress them. Seem humble to fill them with conceit. If at ease, exhaust them. If united, separate them. Attack their weaknesses. Emerge to their surprise.” – Sun Tzu

  4. “Build your opponent a golden bridge to retreat across.” – Sun Tzu

sun tzu quotes
  1. “Energy may be likened to the bending of a crossbow; decision, to the releasing of the trigger.” – Sun Tzu