10 Uplifting Stories To Get You Through The Week (9/23/18) – Listverse


via 10 Uplifting Stories To Get You Through The Week (9/23/18) – Listverse

10 Forbidden Places Where Outsiders Are Arrested (Or Worse) – Listverse


via 10 Forbidden Places Where Outsiders Are Arrested (Or Worse) – Listverse

SME Expert Badge – GlobalLinkers


https://jetairways.globallinker.com/#/bizforum/writearticle/tab/published

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Penecillin from moldy bread and Did you know…


Did you know…

… that today is Rocky Marciano Day? On this day in 1952, Rocky Marciano knocked out world heavyweight champion Jersey Joe Walcott in the 13th round and went on to be the only heavyweight champion in boxing history to retire without a defeat or draw as a professional boxer.

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“If they can make penicillin out of moldy bread, then they can sure make something out of you.”

— Muhammad Ali

Brainpickings – my fav Newsletter


This is the brainpickings.org weekly digest by Maria Popova. If you missed last week’s edition — Walt Whitman on creativity, Toni Morrison on the deepest meaning of love, Martin Buber on what a tree can teach us about seeing each other fully — you can catch up right here. And if you’re enjoying this newsletter, please consider supporting my labor of love with a donation – each month, I spend hundreds of hours and tremendous resources on it, and every little bit of support helps enormously. If you already donate: THANK YOU.

The Only Story in the World: John Steinbeck on Kindness, Good and Evil, the Wellspring of Good Writing

steinbeck_eastofeden.jpg?w=680“All the goodness and the heroisms will rise up again, then be cut down again and rise up,” John Steinbeck (February 27, 1902–December 20, 1968) wrote as he contemplated good, evil, and the necessary contradiction of human nature at the peak of WWII. “It isn’t that the evil thing wins — it never will — but that it doesn’t die.”

A decade later, and a decade before he won the Nobel Prize in Literature, Steinbeck turned this abiding tug of war between good and evil into a literary inquiry in East of Eden (public library) — the 1952 novel that gave us his beautiful wisdom on creativity and the meaning of life, eventually adapted into the 1955 film of the same title starring James Dean.

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John Steinbeck

Steinbeck opens the thirty-fourth chapter with a meditation on the most elemental question through which we experience and measure our lives:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngA child may ask, “What is the world’s story about?” And a grown man or woman may wonder, “What way will the world go? How does it end and, while we’re at it, what’s the story about?”

I believe that there is one story in the world, and only one, that has frightened and inspired us, so that we live in a Pearl White serial of continuing thought and wonder. Humans are caught — in their lives, in their thoughts, in their hungers and ambitions, in their avarice and cruelty, and in their kindness and generosity too — in a net of good and evil. I think this is the only story we have and that it occurs on all levels of feeling and intelligence. Virtue and vice were warp and woof of our first consciousness, and they will be the fabric of our last, and this despite any changes we may impose on field and river and mountain, on economy and manners. There is no other story. A man, after he has brushed off the dust and chips of his life, will have left only the hard, clean questions: Was it good or was it evil? Have I done well — or ill?

At the most fundamental level, the triumph of good over evil presupposes an openhearted curiosity about what is other than ourselves and a certain willingness for understanding — the moral choice of fathoming and honoring the reality, experience, and needs of persons and entities existing beyond our own consciousness. Steinbeck, too, saw the centrality of empathic understanding in the choice of goodness. Perhaps unsurprisingly — since he used his private journal as a creative sandbox for his novels— this sentiment originated in a diary entry.

Decades before Annie Dillard contemplated why a generosity of spirit is the animating force of good writing, Steinbeck echoes Hemingway — “As a writer you should not judge. You should understand.” — and reflects in a journal entry from 1938, quoted in Steinbeck Center director Susan Shillinglaw’s introduction to a 1993 Penguin Classics edition of Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngIn every bit of honest writing in the world… there is a base theme. Try to understand men, if you understand each other you will be kind to each other. Knowing a man well never leads to hate and nearly always leads to love. There are shorter means, many of them. There is writing promoting social change, writing punishing injustice, writing in celebration of heroism, but always that base theme. Try to understand each other.

Complement with Hannah Arendt on our mightiest antidote to evil, James Baldwin on the terror within and the evil without, Mary McCarthy on human nature and how we determine if evil is forgivable, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky on why there are no bad people, then revisit Steinbeck on being vs. becomingthe difficult art of the fried breakup, and his remarkable advice on falling in love in a letter to his teenage son.

My friend is in love with this Japanese Doc:) – WhatsApp forward – No offence meant


I Love this Japanese Doctor~🤔😊

Q: Doctor, I’ve heard that cardiovascular exercise can prolong life. Is this true?
A: Heart only good for so many beats, and that’s it… Don’t waste time on exercise. Everything wear out eventually. Speeding up heart not make you live longer; its like saying you extend life of a car by driving faster. Want to live longer?
Take nap.

Q: Should I reduce my alcohol intake?
A: Oh no. Wine made from fruit. Fruit very good. Brandy distilled wine, that means they take water out of fruity bit so you get even more of goodness that way. Beer also made of grain. Grain good too.
Bottoms up!

Q: What are some of the advantages of participating in a regular exercise program?
A: Can’t think of one, sorry.
My philosophy: No pain…good!

Q: Aren’t fried foods bad for you?
A: YOU NOT LISTENING! Food fried in vegetable oil.
How getting more vegetable be bad?

Q: Is chocolate bad for me?
A: You crazy?!? HEL-LO-O!! Cocoa bean! Another vegetable!
It best feel-good food around!

Q: Is swimming good for your figure?
A: If swimming good for figure,
explain whale to me.

Q: Is getting in shape important for my lifestyle?
A: Hey! ‘Round’ is also a shape!

Well… I hope this has cleared up any misconceptions you may have had about food and diets.

And remember:

Finally the Japanese Doctor summed up: Look mister, Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways – Beer in one hand – chocolate in the other – body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming “WOO-HOO, what a ride my life was”!!!!!😂

 

My friend who loves an undisciplined life and enjoys his drinks is in love with this Japanese Doctor it seems.

Its a WhatsApp forward. No offence is meant to any of my japanese Doctor friends.

What is a Prayer?


Do you Pray?

I loved this interpretation of Prayer.

What is a prayer?
Prayer doesn’t only happen when we kneel or put our hands together and focus and expect things from God. Thinking positive and wishing good for others is a prayer.

When you hug a friend. That’s a prayer.

When you cook something to nourish family and friends. That’s a prayer.

When we send off our near and dear ones and say, ‘drive safely’ or ‘be safe’. That’s a prayer.

When you are helping someone in need by giving your time and energy. You are praying.

When you forgive someone by your heart. That is prayer.

Prayer is a vibration. A feeling. A thought. Prayer is the voice of love, friendship, genuine relationships. Prayer is an expression of your silent being.

Keep praying always…
Stay Blessed🙏

JAI MEHER BABA

Be good – may pay or not! It doesn’t matter 🙏😎💗👍🙌


Be good -It pays. Bad makes you mad. Good takes you to god.

There is nothing bad but different degrees of goodness.
The climax of good is loving. Bad is anger, getting excited.

Good is forgiving. Biting is bad, but to be bit is good.
If you offer your cheek, knowing you could easily wring their neck that is excellent.

——-AVATAR MEHER BABA

[From- LESSONS FOR SPIRITUAL ASPIRANTS, Complied by: BIRENDRA KUMAR]
[Copyright © Avatar Meher Baba Perpetual Public Charitable Trust Ahmednagar (M.S.) India]

Top 10 Crazy And Unconventional Music Genres – Listverse


via Top 10 Crazy And Unconventional Music Genres – Listverse

The Presentation of Data Graphics In Everyday Life by Kristen Sosulski – 168.04.DataVisualization – ChangeThis


via The Presentation of Data Graphics In Everyday Life by Kristen Sosulski – 168.04.DataVisualization – ChangeThis

Look Ma, No Hands! – from The Mission Newsletter


Wealth
Buckle your seatbelts, a recession may be coming.

Hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio in his upcoming book about financial crises says seven indicators can signal depression or recession.

1. Prices are high relative to traditional measures
2. Prices are discounting future rapid price appreciation from these high levels
3. There is a broad bullish sentiment
4. Purchases are being financed with high leverage
5. Buyers have made exceptionally extended forward investments, such as of inventories, to speculate or to protect against price appreciation
6. New buyers have entered the market
7. Stimulative monetary policy threatens to inflate the bubble even more.

Right now, he says those indicators are flickering, not flashing, so we should be safe … but things can change quickly.

“I’m significantly concerned for the next economic downturn for two reasons,” Dalio said. “The first is that we have right now a higher level of populism and a worse wealth gap so that when we have a downturn, the rich and the poor, the left and the right, will be more at each other’s throats.” Second, he said, monetary policy will be less effective because there’s not much room to cut interest rates, and because quantitative easing — the Federal Reserve’s purchase of long-term bonds to lower interest rates — “has much less marginal effectiveness.”

Dalio says it’s not what happens when the next downturn hits, it’s how it’s handled. He suggests giving the president, with input from other agencies, should be given blanket authority to repeal regulations.