• Day: August 10, 2018

  • 10 Things That Happen To Your Body If You Walk Every Day

    I am a MORINING WALKER Primarily. I also do Afternoon walks and evening Walks and I agree with every thing here.

    Dhananjay Parkhe

     

    10 Things That Happen To Your Body If You Walk Every Day
    *LIFE STORY
    On Aug 8, 2018

    You’ll be shocked to learn what happens to your body just from walking daily.

    The real question is, do you have an extra 15 to 30 minutes free every day? Within a 24 hour period, anyone has a half an hour to spare. What should you do with that time? Walk of course. There are too many benefits and good things that come with that 30-minute walk. It is the cheapest and one of the most effective ways to do your whole body good.

    Brain changes for the better
    There has been a study done showing the effects of walking on the brain. According to this study, endorphins increase and stress levels become significantly lowered. Lower impact exercises like walking also aid in the overall brain health and even reduce the percentage of Alzheimer’s and dementia.

    Enhanced vision

    It may sound fishy, but apparently walking every day can benefit the eyes as well. Walking improves some eye pressure thus reducing glaucoma in some cases.

    Keeping the heart strong

    Walking is just as useful as running according to the American Heart Association. It can help in avoiding heart related issues like strokes or other heart related issues. It improves circulation, reduction in cholesterol and can stabilize blood pressure.

    Larger lungs

    Besides eliminating toxins in the body, walking improves the lungs by coaching them to have more oxygen flowing throughout the body. This can greatly impact lung function for the prevention in lung diseases.

    Improving the pancreas

    A study was done that showed people who only walked had better glucose levels than those who ran 6 times as much. This means that people can practically walk their way to preventing diabetes and walking is the better option over running.

    Aiding in digestion

    Balancing the gut for better gut health is vital to prevent colon cancers and other problems like flatulence and constipation. Walking can help normalize the colon by keeping the colon literally moving.

    Leaner muscles

    When a person loses fat in their body the muscles become more prominent and they become leaner. This can be achieved by taking 10,000 steps a day. Going uphill or adding an interval throughout the walk can increase muscle tones to different parts of the body as well. All of that can be marked as you working out at the gym for the day. Walking is much easier on the body so there is less soreness and no healing time which means more continuous walking.

    Firm joints and bones
    Feeling stiff and in pain can be hampered by walking 30 minutes everyday. Stronger joints, warding off injuries and even ruling out bone loss are great ways to keep your body healthy. The Arthritis Foundation recommends walking for a healthier and being comfortable in your own body.

    Relieve back pain

    Much higher impact sports or exercises can damage the back. However, lower impact exercises like walking can relieve back pain and aches by circulating the blood within the spinal area. This along with strengthening flexibility and posture can practically erase any back discomfort.

    Balanced mind
    Walking by yourself but with others can improve mood, lower stress or anxiety. It has even been known to reduce depression in people.

    Pass this along to your friends to teach them the benefits of walking!

    via 10 Things That Happen To Your Body If You Walk Every Day

  • Doing Ethics with Our Brains by John Hooker – We can rationalise anything !

    “We are told that we live in a post-truth age. When the facts get in the way, we turn to ‘alternative facts’ that serve our purposes. Rather than listen to another point of view, we focus only on arguments and talking points that support our ideology. Not everyone is like this, of course, but it seems to capture the tenor of the times. Worst of all, it exacerbates the polarization that so many worry about, because we can’t find common ground.
    The root problem, in my view, is a gradual abandonment of rationality. We can’t reach consensus because we no longer acknowledge a rational basis for resolving disputes.

    Ethics was an early casualty of this retreat from reason.”

    Download
    About John Hooker | John Hooker is a T. Jerome Holleran Professor of Business Ethics and Social Responsibility, and Professor of Operations Research, at Carnegie Mellon University. He has also held visiting posts at several universities, most recently the London School of Economics and the State University of Campinas, Brazil. He brings his extensive background in philosophy and logic to the rigorous analysis of ethical dilemmas, and his background in management science to making sure the dilemmas are realistic. In addition to his blog, Ethical Decisions, he has published over 170 research articles, eight books, and five edited volumes on ethics, philosophy, operations research, and cross-cultural issues, including Business Ethics as Rational Choice and Working across Cultures. He is the founding editor-in-chief of the world’s only academic journal dedicated to teaching business ethics, and he developed the ethics program in the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University.

    via Doing Ethics with Our Brains by John Hooker – 165.01.TakingEthicsSeriously – ChangeThis

  • Your mind isn’t deep at all. In fact, it’s flat. | Big Think

    Your mind isn’t deep at all. In fact, it’s flat.
    August 9, 2018 by DEREK BERES

    Photo: Getty Images
    A box of crackers features the tagline, “Conscious eating.” An artistic subgroup embraces the Burning Man ethos: “Conscious music.” This self-declared genre arises from the same set that talks about techniques for “higher consciousness.” In every instance, the sentiment is obvious: my product is better than yours because there’s something deeper going on over here.

    Consciousness, from their perspective, is like a ladder descending into an unfathomable abyss. This depth can be penetrated, through meditation, through breathing exercises or austerities, through faith or sheer willpower or a combination of the two, or through, apparently, eating crackers. For some, higher consciousness is handed down at birth, from a past life, or bestowed by a teacher, as in the Indian idea of shaktipat. Whatever the method, everyday consciousness only scratches the surface. Something deeper exists, waiting to be mined by the steadfast observer.

    A deep sigh of relief washed over me when reading that Nick Chater called the notion of higher consciousness “nonsense on stilts.” The British behavioral scientist doesn’t mince words in his new book, The Mind is Flat. While many believe consciousness to be a hidden mystery few can access, Chater’s take on this evolutionary phenomenon is quite pedestrian. What you see is effectively what you get.

    No amount of therapy, dream analysis, word association, experiment or brain-scanning can recover a person’s ‘true motives,’ not because they are difficult to find, but because there is nothing to find. The inner, mental world, and the beliefs, motives, and fears it is supposed to contain is, itself, a work of the imagination.

    This is not shocking if you consider consciousness in its most fundamental regard. By definition, consciousness is simply what you’re paying attention to at the moment, which can amount to no more than four or five things. You can refine from there: the goal of meditation, for example, is to focus on one thing—a mantra, a candle flame, your breathing, something basic and accessible. Whether you’re an expert meditator or chronic multitasker, the effects on consciousness are physiological, not mystical.

    Yet that’s not how we feel, which is why Chater’s book is likely to rattle many mental cages. An emotion, he says, is an interpretation of a physiological change in your body. He’s not the first thinker to posit this; Lisa Feldman Barrett wrote an entire book on this topic. While this will not square well with those who claim they know something to be true because they feel it, Chater’s point should not be dismissed. Anecdotal interpretations have the habit of often being wrong.

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    We actually have a limited set of feelings. Think about the innumerable issues that cause a stomach to churn. Context matters, and in this sense, our brain contextualizes the physical sensations based on past experiences. Memory is fluid but based on prior events. Essentially, Chater states that we’re just making it all up as we go along.

    We crave narrative and go to great lengths to fill in incomplete stories regardless of the validity of assumptions being made. This is why Chater thinks the role of psychotherapy is dated. He calls the Jungian notion of a collective unconscious “the astrology of psychology,” rather fitting given that Jung speculated that UFOs are psychic projections from our hidden collective drive. To Chater, comparing Jungian analysis to psychology is akin to relating astrology to astronomy. One exploits patterns of thought and behavior in an attempt to derive coherence, while the other relies on data to pinpoint exact locations and predictable patterns.

    Chater believes psychotherapy feeds the illusion of a hidden depth and claims the industry is on the outs.

    [Psychotherapy is] doomed by the fact that there is not a deep inner story that is hiding from you. Rather, you’ve got the first draft or a set of incoherent notes for a novel. You’ve got an incoherent muddle. And we’re all incoherent muddles to some degree. But when some of those incoherencies cause us problems, when we’re terrified of something we very much want to do, even something as narrow as a fear of spiders, these are conflicts in our thinking and reactions.

    In his latest book, The Strange Order of Things, neuroscientist Antonio Damasio writes that feelings are “for” life regulation. They provide essential information to help us remain in homeostasis. If something is out of whack a feeling lets us know. Again, context matters. Our stomach gets jittery if we’ve eaten something rotten and when we’re courting a romantic partner. As Damasio states, feelings alert us to potential danger as well as potential opportunity. There is nothing metaphysical about the process.

    But we perceive it to be other, as Chater writes. Instead of a perception refined by years of experiences, we come to feel that the deep well of the unconscious is simmering below the surface, like the famed kundalini energy at the base of the spine. Hyperventilate enough and you unleash its fury. Well, true, Chater might say—hyperventilate enough and your nervous system is certainly going to react in peculiar and dangerous ways.

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    Does this make psychotherapy useless? Not so fast, Chater concludes. First off, talking to another is proven medicine. Chater also says creativity is an important aspect of our humanity. Ingenious solutions can be worked out between a therapist and patient, provided it’s understood as a metaphor. His contention seems to be assuming metaphor to represent reality as stated. Constructing new patterns of thought and behavior has therapeutic utility; uncovering unconscious motives or beliefs is not only counterproductive but dangerous:

    The reason I think the unconscious is a dangerous metaphor is because it gives you the impression that mental things that are unconscious could be conscious. This whole idea of uncovering things from the unconscious and making them conscious has the presupposition that they are of the same type.

    He compares this yearning for a hidden depth to Freud’s iceberg: consciousness at the top, the real story under the surface, which Chater says is a mistaken analysis of how our brains actually work.

    The things we’re conscious of—experiences, thoughts, fragments of conversation—are completely different in type from the things we’re unconscious of—all these mysterious brain processes, which lay down and retrieve memories, piece fragments of information together, and so on. The brain is doing lots of unconscious work—but it is not thought in any way we understand it.

    What is unconscious can never be made conscious because the information is inaccessible by design. I’ll never be conscious of my liver detoxifying my blood, but if something goes wrong in that process I’ll certainly feel the result. If the unconscious could be made conscious, we’d never need a doctor to diagnose an illness; our body would tell us.

    We’re just not as deep as we think, which is fine: we have plenty of work to do on the surface. Perhaps if we stop taking so many metaphors as reality, we’d get along much better, with ourselves and those around us. There’s plenty to see when we open our eyes. Closing them to seek a treasure causes us to miss the treasure right before us.

    Stay in touch with Derek on Facebook and Twitter.

    via Your mind isn’t deep at all. In fact, it’s flat. | Big Think

  • How to Become a Professional Sleeper (Career Path)

    How to Become a Professional Sleeper (Career Path)
    Joanna Zambas

    Is your morning alarm usually followed by 15-20 snoozes? Do you find getting out of bed every morning extremely difficult? And do you crawl through work each day at work, dreaming about home-time and climbing back into bed for some much-need beauty sleep?

    If this sounds a lot like your dream job, keep reading to find out all you need to know about becoming a professional sleeper!

    1. Research the Profession
    You know you want to sleep all day (don’t we all?) but what you really need to know is what your working hours will be, how much you’ll get paid and what skills you need to meet the requirements for the job.

    Job Description
    Quite simply, a professional sleeper is someone who gets paid to sleep. They generally do this as part of scientific research where scientists analyse their sleep patterns or to evaluate the quality of various sleep-related products.

    Although your day-to-day duties will vary, you’ll be expected to:

    test mattresses, pillows and quilts
    write detailed reports on comfort, room lighting, feelings and noise disruption
    occasionally take sleep aids that will help you fall asleep for medical trials
    take sleeping pills to remain still for art exhibitions.
    Essential Skills and Qualities
    In order to succeed in this exciting career path, you’ll need:

    the ability to sleep in new surroundings, away from home for long periods of time
    the ability to sleep with wires attached to you, knowing that people will be watching you
    good overall health and fitness
    excellent communicationand interpersonal skills
    the ability to write compelling and interesting reports
    good observational skills
    a strong character and not be bothered about spending a lot of time secluded from others
    strong organisational skills
    Working Hours and Conditions
    Sleeping on the job might not be all it’s hyped up to be, as contracts for professional sleepers aren’t known for being consistent, which is typical for all types of freelance work. In other words, this isn’t your typical 9-to-5 job.

    Mattress and sleep testers will generally need to sign up to a number of different studies and will need to manage their diary to ensure no two jobs clash. Certain studies can last between 24 hours to 2 months, so there’s no telling how long you will need to spend away from home.

    Employers should be able to guarantee you a safe working environment – you’ll either work/sleep in test centres, hospital or even luxury hotels, and there will always be a medical professional close by if needed.

    Salary Prospects
    As the length and duties of each job vary, it’s difficult to set an average salary.

    That said, NASA paid volunteers $18,000 (£13,250) to lie in bed for 70 days back in 2013, while one study at the University of Colorado offered to pay subjects up to $2,730 (£2,010) to participate in a 14-17 sleep study.

    In 2006, meanwhile, budget hotel chain Travelodge hired Wayne Munnelly into their newly created Director of Sleep position. He was offered a £60,000 salary to sleep in every single one of the chain’s 17,000 rooms and evaluate lighting, noise, cleanliness and overall comfort.

    Roisin Madigan, a student from Manchester, was paid £1,000 a day to sleep in designer beds for a month, while the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City offered subjects $10 (£7.30) an hour to take sleeping pills and sleep on bed in the middle of the museum as part of a Chu Yun exhibit.

    Pros and Cons
    Pros include:

    you’ll get paid to sleep (could this possibly be the best job in the world?!)
    you’ll get to learn more about your own sleeping patterns
    you’ll receive medical treatment for any problems detected
    studies aren’t continuous and if you walk out midway, you still get paid for the days you participated in the study
    if you’re a mattress tester, you’ll get to stay in luxury hotels and enjoy five-star treatment – for free!
    Cons include:

    you’ll need to make some lifestyle changes – for example, you won’t be allowed caffeine, alcohol, vitamins, etc or you’ll be asked to drink/eat certain things as part of the study
    you may spend a long time indoors and will begin to feel out of touch with the outside world
    you’ll spend long periods of time away from family and friends
    you won’t have a regular source of income
    you may have to wait up to a month to be allowed to participate in another test

    2. Get the Qualifications
    There are no specific qualifications required to become a professional sleeper or mattress/quilt tester. However, you do need to be at least 18 years of age and will need to fit a variety of criteria for the study. This will vary from job to job, but you’ll usually need to be in good health and willing to provide your full health history and, in some cases, even the medical history of your entire family.

    For some studies (ie: those that test sleeping pills), you may need to suffer from insomnia or generally be someone who has difficulty sleeping at night. Additionally, you’ll need to have a flexible working schedule as projects can take place at any time of the day.

    3. Land Your First Job
    Landing your first job as a sleep tester isn’t as straightforward as other, more conventional professions.

    You will need to keep an eye out for adverts online – many people find opportunities on sites like Craigslist and university websites. You could also set up a Google Alert for when sleep testing positions open up so you can be the first to be notified.

    Alternatively, you could contact mattress companies and hotels directly, and pitch your sleep testing services. You could also set up your own blog, in hopes that you’ll get noticed by big companies who are looking for professional sleep testers.

    4. Develop Your Career
    There isn’t much scope for career development in this field but if you’re smart, you can save a lot of money by taking part in high-paying studies. You’ll even learn more about your personal skills and qualities while you’re at it. This will, ultimately, give you time and funding to invest in your hobby and turn it into a full-time income source!

    Do you think you have what it takes to become a professional sleeper? Let us know your thoughts on this dreamy gig in the comments section below…

    This article was originally published in March 2014.

    Currency conversions are based on rates supplied by XE.com on 14 May 2018.

    via How to Become a Professional Sleeper (Career Path)

  • Random Acts of Kindness

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    Make amends with someone you may have wronged Someone wronged you? Forgive them Someone looking lost? Help them with directions Go out of your way to thank someone today! Surprise your parents with flowers Save …

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  • 6 legit jobs that seem too good to be true | Ladders

    Who says working a 9-to-5 job has to be a drag? Turning your biggest passion or a fun pastime into a career can make you start loving your life during the week rather than merely living for the weekend. And you’d be surprised by how many pleasurable activities in life can be turned into professions. Here are six unique passions you can turn into a career — and how to do it.

    1. For the one who values sleep above all else: Professional sleeper
    If you love snoozing more than most other things in life, being a professional sleeper probably sounds like your dream career.

    Job Description: A professional sleeper is just what it sounds like — you get paid to sleep. Professional sleepers are employed for a variety of reasons. Some are hired by scientists and sleep research facilities for the purpose of analyzing a person’s sleep patterns to learn more about sleep itself and what goes on in the human brain during it. Others are hired by manufacturers to test the effectiveness of various sleep-related products — mattresses, pillows, room lighting and, in some cases, new sleeping pills.

    Required Skills and Qualifications:

    The ability to sleep in new surroundings away from home for long periods of time
    The ability to sleep with potential wires attached to you, knowing that people are watching you
    Being overall fit and healthy
    The ability to write compelling and interesting reports about your quality of sleep at any given time
    Good observational skills
    Not bothered by spending a lot of time secluded from others
    Great communication and interpersonal skills
    Pay: On average, $66,000 a year. But it could be more or less than that, depending on the company that hires you, the location of your job and your previous experience.

    via 6 legit jobs that seem too good to be true | Ladders