10 Police Tactics That Can Lead To False Confessions – Listverse


via 10 Police Tactics That Can Lead To False Confessions – Listverse

Good articles from e-Skeptics Newsletter


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SCIENCE SALON # 32

Nina Teicholz — The Big Fat Surprise About Diet and Nutrition

The Big Fat Surprise (book cover)

In this fascinating conversation with Michael Shermer, the investigative journalist Nina Teicholz reviews the scientific literature on diet and nutrition, the link (or lack thereof) between dietary cholesterol and heart disease, the history of the government’s recommendation of what constitutes a healthy diet and why they got it so wrong, statins and heart disease, exercise and nutrition, an update on what has happened since her book, The Big Fat Surprise, was published in 2014, and most importantly what you should eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner tomorrow (hint: it’s okay to have meat, butter and cheese without feeling guilty).

Nina Teicholz is an investigative science journalist and author. Her international bestseller, The Big Fat Surprisehas upended the conventional wisdom on dietary fat—especially saturated fat. The executive editor of The Lancetwrote, “this is a disquieting book about…ruthless silencing of dissent that has shaped our lives for decades…researchers, clinicians, and health policy advisors should read this provocative book.” The Big Fat Surprise was named a 2014 Best Book by The Economist, the Wall Street JournalForbesMother Jones, and Library Journal. Teicholz is also the Executive Director of The Nutrition Coalition, a non-profit group that promotes evidence-based nutrition policy. She is a graduate of Stanford and Oxford Universities and previously served as associate director of the Center for Globalization and Sustainable Development at Columbia University. Teicholz now lives in New York city with her husband and two sons.

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This remote Science Salon was recorded on July 19, 2018.

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THE GREAT DEBATE ON THE NATURE OF REALITY

Michael Shermer vs. Frank Turek

Does belief in God make sense of the world? Or does reality itself point to God’s absence? Is God real or is he a product of human minds? On Friday, August 24, watch Michael Shermer and Frank Turek debate “What better explains reality: Atheism or Theism?

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Scientific American | Skeptic | Michael Shermer | Viewing the World with a Rational Eye

MICHAEL SHERMER’S “SKEPTIC” COLUMN IN SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN

23 and We: Limitations of Personal Genome Service Testing

Like a lot of baby boomers, I find myself gravitating to newspaper obits, cross-checking ages and causes of death with my current health parameters, most notably heart disease (which felled my father and grandfather) and cancer (which slew my mother). And then there is Alzheimer’s disease, which a 2015 report by the Alzheimer’s Association projects will destroy the brains of more than 28 million baby boomers. Given the importance of family history and genetics for longevity, I plunked down $199 for a 23andMe Health + Ancestry Service kit, spit into the little plastic vial, opted in for every test available for disease gene variants and anxiously awaited my reports. How’d they do?

First, the company captured my ancestry well at 99.7 percent European, primarily French/German (29.9 percent), British/Irish (21.6 percent), Balkan/Greece (16.4 percent) and Scandinavian/ Sweden (5.5 percent). My maternal grandmother is German and grandfather Greek; my fraternal great-grandparents were from Sweden and Denmark. […]

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I’m Organisationally Challenged:) Remember him?


Did you know…

… that today is Odie’s Birthday? Odie the dog, Garfield’s best friend, first appeared on August 8, 1978, in the Jim Davis comic strip Garfield. Trivia buffs: Odie was based on a car dealership commercial written by Jim Davis, which featured Odie the Village Idiot. Davis liked the name Odie and decided to use it again.

~~~

Today’s Inspirational Quote:

“I’m not messy. I’m organizationally challenged!”

— Garfield the Cat

Quote from : Iris Apfel | 1921 – | American fashion icon


For me work is great fun. I love what I do. And, it’s much more interesting than sitting around with a bunch of dopey dames.”

Iris Apfel | 1921 – | American fashion icon

Picked that one up from the HBO documentary, ‘If You’re Not in the Obit, Eat Breakfast.’ It’s an inspiring reminder that life can be a happy thing for far longer than some might think.
Apfel will be 97 at the end of this month. Another reminder from her is below.

“The day I grew up was the day I realized there is no free lunch. You pay for everything — not only in money — but you pay with time, with experience, with love, with pain, you pay some way. You don’t get away free. If you do, you get something for nothing, and it’s worth nothing.”

Jay’s Mentor Wisdom Quotes


MENTOR Humor (don’t these sound familiar to some famous Quotes?

  1. Progress does not happen without change, and change doesn’t happen without an open mind. – Jay Parkhe

  2. When no one challenges your ideas; it is even more important to closely evaluate them. – Jay Parkhe

  3. You can’t discover new places if you never leave the comfort of your home. – Jay Parkhe

  4. The more you like yourself, and the less you’re likely to be like others and THAT makes you truly unique. Jay Parkhe

  5. GIVE it Everything You’ve Got, even in you smallest steps and you’ll be on the path to success, surely and certainly – Jay Parkhe

Jay’s Mantra-Random Acts of Kindness Today.


  1. Go out of your way to thank someone today!
  2. Make someone a cup of coffee
  3. Who will be making dinner for your family today? Tag, you’re it!
  4. Buy someone a coffee
  5. Go the day without complaining
  6. Help someone struggling with heavy bags
  7. Pay for someone else’s meal today
  8. Remember that friend you haven’t seen for ages? Give them a call
  9. Good servicing requires a lot of effort; tip them!
  10. Know someone who’s feeling under the weather? Pay them a visit!

From Maria Popova on Brainpickings


I’m trying something new: Because Brain Pickings is in its twelfth year and because I write primarily about ideas of a timeless character, I have decided to plunge into my vast archive every Wednesday and choose from the thousands of essays one worth resurfacing and resavoring as a midweek pick-me-up for heart, mind, and spirit. If you don’t wish to receive these archival infusions of inspiration, you can unsubscribe from them – if you subscribe to the standard Sunday digest of the current week’s highlights, this wouldn’t affect its delivery. If you missed last week’s archival piece – the little-known scientific contributions and mushroom drawings of Peter Rabbit creator Beatrix Potter – you can read it here. And if you find any value and joy in my labor of love, please consider supporting it with a donation – over these twelve years, I have spent tens of thousands of hours and tremendous resources on Brain Pickings, and every little bit of support helps keep it going. If you already donate: THANK YOU.
FROM THE ARCHIVE | Albert Camus on Strength of Character and How to Ennoble Our Minds in Difficult Times
albertcamus_essays.jpg?fit=263%2C388
In 1957, Albert Camus (November 7, 1913–January 4, 1960) became the second youngest laureate of the Nobel Prize in Literature, awarded to him for work that “with clear-sighted earnestness illuminates the problems of the human conscience in our times.” (It was with this earnestness that, days after receiving the coveted accolade, he sent his childhood teacher a beautiful letter of gratitude.)
More than half a century later, his lucid and luminous insight renders Camus a timeless seer of truth, one who ennobles and enlarges the human spirit in the very act of seeing it — the kind of attentiveness that calls to mind his compatriot Simone Weil, whom he admired more than he did any other thinker and who memorably asserted that “attention is the rarest and purest form of generosity.”
Nowhere does Camus’s generous attention to the human spirit emanate more brilliantly than in a 1940 essay titled “The Almond Trees” (after the arboreal species that blooms in winter), found in his Lyrical and Critical Essays (public library) — the superb volume that gave us Camus on happiness, despair, and how to amplify our love of life. Penned at the peak of WWII, to the shrill crescendo of humanity’s collective cry for justice and mercy, Camus’s clarion call for reawakening our noblest nature reverberates with newfound poignancy today, amid our present age of shootings and senseless violence.
albertcamus1.jpg?resize=680%2C432
At only twenty-seven, Camus writes:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngWe have not overcome our condition, and yet we know it better. We know that we live in contradiction, but we also know that we must refuse this contradiction and do what is needed to reduce it. Our task as [humans] is to find the few principles that will calm the infinite anguish of free souls. We must mend what has been torn apart, make justice imaginable again in a world so obviously unjust, give happiness a meaning once more to peoples poisoned by the misery of the century. Naturally, it is a superhuman task. But superhuman is the term for tasks [we] take a long time to accomplish, that’s all.

Let us know our aims then, holding fast to the mind, even if force puts on a thoughtful or a comfortable face in order to seduce us. The first thing is not to despair. Let us not listen too much to those who proclaim that the world is at an end. Civilizations do not die so easily, and even if our world were to collapse, it would not have been the first. It is indeed true that we live in tragic times. But too many people confuse tragedy with despair. “Tragedy,” [D.H.] Lawrence said, “ought to be a great kick at misery.” This is a healthy and immediately applicable thought. There are many things today deserving such a kick.

In a sentiment evocative of the 1919 manifesto Declaration of the Independence of the Mind — which was signed by such luminaries as Bertrand Russell, Albert Einstein, Rabindranath Tagore, Jane Addams, Upton Sinclair, Stefan Zweig, and Hermann Hesse — Camus argues that this “kick” is to be delivered by the deliberate cultivation of the mind’s highest virtues:

2e292385-dc1c-4cfe-b95e-845f6f98c2ec.pngIf we are to save the mind we must ignore its gloomy virtues and celebrate its strength and wonder. Our world is poisoned by its misery, and seems to wallow in it. It has utterly surrendered to that evil which Nietzsche called the spirit of heaviness. Let us not add to this. It is futile to weep over the mind, it is enough to labor for it.

But where are the conquering virtues of the mind? The same Nietzsche listed them as mortal enemies to heaviness of the spirit. For him, they are strength of character, taste, the “world,” classical happiness, severe pride, the cold frugality of the wise. More than ever, these virtues are necessary today, and each of us can choose the one that suits him best. Before the vastness of the undertaking, let no one forget strength of character. I don’t mean the theatrical kind on political platforms, complete with frowns and threatening gestures. But the kind that through the virtue of its purity and its sap, stands up to all the winds that blow in from the sea. Such is the strength of character that in the winter of the world will prepare the fruit.

Elsewhere in the volume, Camus writes: “In the depths of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer.” Each time our world cycles through a winter of the human spirit, Camus remains an abiding hearth of the invisible summer within us, his work a perennial invitation to reinhabit our deepest decency and live up to our most ennobled nature.
Complement this particular excerpt from the thoroughly elevating Lyrical and Critical Essays with Nietzsche on what it really means to be a free spirit and Susan Sontag on how to be a moral human being, then revisit Camus on happiness, unhappiness, and our self-imposed prisons and our search for meaning.

From my respected Mentor – Dr. Marshall Goldsmith


In this week’s interview with Chris Cuomo, my great friend, journalist and news anchor of CNN’s Cuomo Prime Time interviews me about one of the trickiest bad habits in my book, What Got You Here Won’t Get You There.
I hope you enjoy and learn as Chris and I explore the concept of “adding too much value”.
For more articles and videos, check out all of my posts on LinkedIn!
Is It Worth It?
Is It Worth It?
Chris Cuomo, journalist and news anchor on CNN’s Cuomo Prime Time, recently interviewed me about one of the trickiest bad habits in my book, What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, adding too much value. We explore the concept in the short excerpt from our interview below. Chris: Chris Cuomo here with the … Continue reading Is It Worth It to Add Value? Not Always.…»

All of these videos are online, so if you haven’t had a chance to see one yet or if you’d like a refresher they are available at Thinkers50. I hope you find these videos to be fun and useful and that you continue to share them!

Life is good.
Marshall

About the Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog

The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog and accompanying written articles incorporate learnings from my 38 years of experience with top executives, as well as material from my previous research, articles, and books, including What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, MOJO, Coaching for Leadership, and my new book, New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-selling Triggers.

From my respected Mentor – Dr. Marshall Goldsmith


In this week’s interview with Chris Cuomo, my great friend, journalist and news anchor of CNN’s Cuomo Prime Time interviews me about one of the trickiest bad habits in my book, What Got You Here Won’t Get You There.
I hope you enjoy and learn as Chris and I explore the concept of “adding too much value”.
For more articles and videos, check out all of my posts on LinkedIn!
Is It Worth It?
Is It Worth It?
Chris Cuomo, journalist and news anchor on CNN’s Cuomo Prime Time, recently interviewed me about one of the trickiest bad habits in my book, What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, adding too much value. We explore the concept in the short excerpt from our interview below. Chris: Chris Cuomo here with the … Continue reading Is It Worth It to Add Value? Not Always.…»

All of these videos are online, so if you haven’t had a chance to see one yet or if you’d like a refresher they are available at Thinkers50. I hope you find these videos to be fun and useful and that you continue to share them!

Life is good.
Marshall

About the Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog

The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog and accompanying written articles incorporate learnings from my 38 years of experience with top executives, as well as material from my previous research, articles, and books, including What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, MOJO, Coaching for Leadership, and my new book, New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-selling Triggers.

How to be happier? Try a “rougher” schedule | Big Think


via How to be happier? Try a “rougher” schedule | Big Think

The development of love is conditioned and sustained by the tension of duality.


God has to suffer apparent differentiation into a multiplicity of souls in order to carry on the game of love.

They are His own forms, and in relation to them He at once assumes the role of the Divine Lover and the Divine Beloved.

As the Beloved, He is the real and the ultimate object of their appreciation.

As the Divine Lover, He is their real and ultimate saviour drawing them back to Himself.

Thus though the whole world of duality is only an illusion, that illusion has come into being for a significant purpose.

——-AVATAR MEHER BABA

[Source- Discourses by Meher Baba, volume-I, p-164 (Copyright ©1967 by Adi K. Irani, King’s Rd., Ahmednagar, Maharashtra, India]