When Forgiving oneself is the hardest kind of forgiveness.

I foundis artic thle very interesting and wort a read.  Sharing.

 

Andrea Brandt Ph.D. M.F.T.
Mindful Anger

When Forgiving Yourself Is the Hardest Kind of Forgiveness
How do you forgive yourself even when it feels impossible?
Posted Oct 02, 2017

SHARE

TWEET

EMAIL

MORE

Source: Big Stock Images
So you’ve done something wrong. You’ve hurt someone else or yourself, and now you feel angry, guilty, sad, or ashamed. If someone else had wronged you, you’d want an apology, and then you’d decide whether or not to forgive them. But when it’s you who’s done the wronging, the steps are less clear. Maybe you don’t believe you deserve forgiveness, or you do but don’t know how to self-forgive. Either way, you feel awful.

How do you forgive yourself even when it feels impossible?

The first thing I’d like you to do is to acknowledge and appreciate the way you feel right now. Acknowledge that not everyone is self-aware or empathetic enough to admit they’ve done something wrong. Appreciate that you’re the kind of person who can recognize your faults and mistakes and say, “I did this; I am responsible.” You’ve done something wrong, yes, but at your core, you are a good person.

You may have read one of my earlier articles about forgiving others. Many of the principles of self-forgiveness are the same as forgiving someone else. When you forgive another or forgive yourself, you let go of your grievances and judgments and allow healing to start. By “let go” I don’t mean you pretend it never happened or say that what happened was OK. Forgiveness isn’t a pardon or an excuse, and it doesn’t mean you can’t continue to have feelings about what happened. Forgiving means accepting what happened and finding a way to move forward.

As a marriage and family therapist, I’ve worked with many patients on self-forgiveness. Some have done things that may seem unforgivable, but there’s one thing that those who’ve done the “unforgivable” and those who’ve done the easier-to-forgive have in common: They’re all human. Human beings make mistakes. Some mistakes are small, and some are enormous, but they’re all made for the same reason: We are imperfect creatures, and we’re all deserving of forgiveness.

We’re all doing the best we can with the tools we have. Sometimes those tools aren’t very helpful; our parents weren’t good role models, or our perceptions and judgments are flawed, or our beliefs and points of reference don’t serve our interests. I want you to sit quietly for a moment and say to yourself, “I did what I did because I am human and human beings aren’t perfect.”

The next step toward self-forgiveness is seeing the whole picture of the situation that needs releasing. This means you need to accept what happened,
understand how and why it happened, and see all that came out of it—the obvious bad and the not-so-obvious good.

To forgive yourself, you need to mindfully expand your view of what happened. First, you must own what you have done and the consequences of your actions. And, you need to accept that there’s nothing you can do to change the past.

via When Forgiving Yourself Is the Hardest Kind of Forgiveness | Psychology Today

Advertisements

Difficult Lessons: How to Learn What You Need to and Move On

Excellent article I found. Sharing. 
Difficult Lessons: How to Learn What You Need to and Move On

By Fiona Robyn



“Nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know.” ~Pema ChodronRumi says, “Until you’ve found pain, you won’t reach the cure.”


I’ve been self-employed for many years now. This is no accident. I’ve always liked to do things my own way. I like to arrange my diary in exactly the way I want to, and make my own mind up about how I do things. I like to work without having to justify anything to a manager.


I’m not always comfortable in working relationships where the other person is “higher up” than me—when they’re in authority. You could say that I’m a teensy bit of a control-freak.


I used to work for a big corporation, and my relationships with my managers weren’t always easy. I was very critical of the way they did things, and if they criticized me I sometimes got very defensive. I learned a great deal from a couple of good managers, but I also spent a lot of time resenting being “told what to do.”


Recently, I decided to embark upon training to become a Buddhist minister. This involves having a “supervisor” who is responsible for my spiritual training, and who will ultimately be responsible for deciding whether or not I “make the grade” and ordain.


Last month, my supervisor asked me a question in an email and I felt immediately attacked and defensive. I felt annoyed. I complained to my friend. I sent her a long and rambling reply, outlining all the reasons why she shouldn’t be asking the question. We exchanged a few emails, and the situation got more and more confused.


I thought I’d managed to avoid conflict with people senior to me when I became self-employed. I didn’t have a manager anymore, so what was the problem?


The problem is that, as Pema Chodron says, nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know.


This difficult situation arose with my supervisor because I had avoided dealing with my control issues by becoming self-employed. It was only a matter of time before these issues might have appeared in a different place in my life—with a colleague, perhaps, or in a disguised form in a relationship with a friend.


After trying to sort things out by email, eventually my supervisor phoned me and we had a conversation about what had happened. I was still feeling very defensive, and quite angry. We spoke for a while. She was patient and encouraged me to be open.


Eventually, I admitted that I sometimes found it difficult to be in relationships with people who hold authority over me. This was a turning point. Once this was “out in the open,” it was more possible to look objectively at what had happened between us.


By the end of the phone call I felt a huge sense of relief. I had challenged my supervisor, and she had survived. She could see my point of view, and I could see her point of view. She did have a good point with her question!


I haven’t suddenly become the ideal employee, but I do feel that I’ve begun to make progress in how I deal with authority. I can now feel grateful for this incident, however uncomfortable it was at the time.


If you feel trapped by a difficult situation that keeps re-appearing, no matter what you do, the following suggestions might help:


Be kind to yourself.

We can often end up in similar situations with different people, after promising ourselves that we won’t. This is because we are human! It can be easy to beat ourselves up, but it isn’t helpful, and it only adds misery to an already-miserable situation.


Be honest.

Once you’ve been kind to yourself, it’s helpful to be as honest with yourself as you can. It’s natural to want to blame the other person when we’re in conflict. Begin to take some responsibility for your part in what has happened. If you can do this, then change is possible.


Be curious.

Do you recognize this pattern from your history? From elsewhere in your life? What happens? How does it start? What hooks you in? It might help to discuss this with a good friend, or to write some notes.


Be aware.

Try and catch yourself when you find yourself in a similar situation. When something starts hooking you in, notice, “Ah, here I am again!”


Be experimental.

This is where you can try behaving differently from the way you usually behave.


This might be holding your tongue, or it might be being more honest with the person you’re speaking with. It might be feeling things you’ve been avoiding, like sadness or anger. It might be taking some time away from the situation to consider what you’d like to do, rather than diving in feet first. Keep being curious, keep talking to your friends, and keep experimenting.


Be grateful.

If you can find a way to learn something from what is happening, then you will change for the better. You are also likely to feel the same relief I did when I “came clean” with my supervisor. Pause and feel grateful for what happened, and for the lesson you learned.


None of us like learning lessons about ourselves. None of us like to be wrong, or to acknowledge a part of ourselves that is flawed or frightened. This is why our lessons have to keep coming back over and over again.


Rumi says, “Until you’ve found pain, you won’t reach the cure.” When I look back over my life, I realize the most important lessons I’ve learned have often been a result of some kind of pain—whether the pain manifested as disappointment, or anger, or fear. I would never think so at the time, but I can feel grateful for that pain now.


Without this pain, I wouldn’t be the person I am now—a teensy bit less of a control freak! More humble. Hopefully, more loving. And definitely more grateful for life and all that it gives me.


Photo by zappowbang

Excellent short books and download from ChangeThis.

Change speeds. Tom Peters, author of The Excellence Dividend, reading the umpteenth article on how we must now do everything in business at a jillion miles an hour, thought “What a crock,” and decided to pen a response. Read The Speed Trap.
Change sales. James Kouzes, Barry Posner, and Deb Calvert, authors ofStop Selling & Start Leading, discuss how sales can transform “values into actions, visions into realities, obstacles into innovations, separateness into solidarity, and risks into rewards.” ReadWhat If Sellers Behaved as Leaders?
Change the future. Alice Mann, author of Future First, helps leaders plan for, and bring about a more positive future, by detailing “eight essential business practices for futureproofing your company.” ReadFutureproof.
Change relationships. Mary Abbajay, author of Managing Up, suggests we stop wishing the workplace was more of a meritocracy, and start developing a positive and productive relationship with our boss to drive our success.” Read Don’t Suck Up, Manage Up.
Change beliefs. Hylke Faber, author of Taming Your Crocodiles, believes knowing who we truly are is the core of effective leadership and a fulfilling life, and helps us define and overcome our deepest fears to get us there. ReadTaming Your Seven Crocodiles.
Change size. Sharon Rowe, author ofThe Magic of Tiny Business, discusses the many advantages of scaling your business to the needs of your life, and to the needs of society. Read Finding the Magic in “Tiny” Business.